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These United States: The Question of Our Past, Volume II, Since 1865, Concise Edition,9780130978042

These United States: The Question of Our Past, Volume II, Since 1865, Concise Edition

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780130978042

ISBN10:
0130978043
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $51.35
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Summary

For survey courses in U.S. History. Written by a Pulitzer Prize winning author, this concise survey explores the many and varied threads of American historysocial, intellectual, cultural political, diplomatic, economic, and militaryfrom the arrival of the first native American inhabitants thousands of years ago through the crisis following the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington on September 11, 2001. Inclusive of all the diverse groups that are and have been part of the American fabric, it shows how the story of America is a human story revealing the imperfections, as well as the triumphs of human endeavor and the human spirit. Using a unique inquiry approach, each chapter is built around a specific question or theme designed to challenge students to consider the complexity of America's past.

Table of Contents

Maps
xi
About the Author xii
Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xv
Reconstruction
What Went Wrong?
1(32)
The Legacy of War
2(2)
Issues and Attitudes
4(2)
Presidential Reconstruction
6(6)
Congress Takes Over
12(3)
Congressional Reconstruction
15(3)
Reconstruction in the South
18(12)
Conclusions
30(3)
The Triumph of Industrialism
What Were the Causes, What Were the Costs?
33(29)
Captains of Industry
34(6)
The Spoilers
40(3)
The Intellectual Foundation
43(2)
The Role of Government
45(3)
The Wage Earners
48(4)
Working-Class Protest
52(8)
Conclusions
60(2)
Age of the City
What Did Cities Offer? And to Whom?
62(23)
Immigration
63(7)
The Urban Environment
70(5)
City Government
75(3)
A Better Place to Live
78(5)
Conclusions
83(2)
The Trans-Missouri West
Another Colony?
85(28)
Settlement of the Last West
86(2)
Native Peoples of the Last West
88(9)
The Mining Frontier
97(3)
The Cattle Kingdom
100(3)
Western Land Policies
103(2)
Farming in the Last West
105(2)
Farm Discontent and Western Revolt
107(3)
The Grangers
110(1)
Conclusions
111(2)
The Gilded Age
How ``Gilded'' Was It?
113(34)
Politics in the Gilded Age
114(4)
The Bases for Party Affiliation
118(2)
Party Realignments
120(7)
Culture in the Age of the Dynamo
127(18)
Conclusions
145(2)
The American Empire
Why Did the United States Look Abroad?
147(21)
The Background
148(1)
The Beginnings of Overseas Expansion
149(5)
Hawaii and Venezuela
154(3)
Cuba Libre
157(3)
The Spanish-American War
160(3)
Imperial America
163(3)
Conclusions
166(2)
Progressivism
What Were Its Roots and What Were Its Accomplishments?
168(30)
Uncertainties
169(4)
The Opinion Makers
173(2)
Progressivism Enters Politics
175(6)
Progressivism Goes National
181(11)
The Wilson Administration
192(4)
Conclusions
196(2)
World War I
Idealism, National Interest, or Neutral Rights?
198(27)
Wilson and the World Order
199(4)
Neutrality and Public Opinion
203(2)
Neutral Rights
205(7)
The War
212(2)
The War Effort at Home
214(5)
Making the Peace
219(4)
Conclusions
223(2)
The Twenties
Happy Adolescence or Decade of Stress?
225(24)
The Swing to the Political Right
226(4)
``New Era'' Prosperity
230(3)
Old and New America
233(10)
Confrontation
243(4)
Conclusions
247(2)
The New Deal
Too Far or Not Far Enough?
249(27)
Boom and Bust
250(6)
Hoover and the Depression
256(4)
Fdr's New Deal
260(5)
Friends and Enemies
265(4)
The Social Welfare State
269(3)
End of the New Deal
272(2)
Conclusions
274(2)
World War II
Blunder, or Decision in the National Interest?
276(32)
Seeds of Conflict
278(5)
The Erosion of American Neutrality
283(7)
The Home Front
290(6)
The Fighting Fronts
296(9)
Conclusions
305(3)
Postwar America
Why So Security Conscious?
308(37)
The Politics of Dead Center
309(6)
The Good Life
315(4)
The Other Half
319(4)
The Cold War
323(13)
A Second ``Red Scare''
336(6)
Conclusions
342(3)
The Dissenting Sixties
Why Protest in the ``Great Society''?
345(35)
Politics in Camelot
346(10)
The Affluent Society
356(2)
The Johnson Years
358(4)
The Rise of Dissent
362(6)
Liberation
368(3)
Quagmire in Vietnam
371(3)
The 1968 Election
374(4)
Conclusions
378(2)
The Uncertain Seventies
Why Did the Right Fail?
380(33)
The Nixon Presidency
381(9)
Watergate
390(5)
Seventies Discontents
395(9)
The Energy Crisis and Economic Malaise
404(3)
The Carter Years
407(5)
Conclusions
412(1)
The ``Reagan Revolution''
What Was It? What Did It Accomplish?
413(26)
The Frist Term
414(11)
The Second Four Years
425(11)
Conclusions
436(3)
A Different America?
Would Diversity and the Cold War's End Change America?
439
The Bush Administration
441(3)
The Gulf War
444(5)
The Election of 1992
449(3)
Clinton's First Term
452(9)
Race, Gender, and Nationality
461(17)
The New Economy
478(6)
Election 2000
484(3)
Bush and the War Against Terrorism
487(10)
Conclusions
497
APPENDIX 1(1)
The Declaration of Independence
1(4)
The Constitution of the United States of America
5(13)
Presidential Elections
18(4)
Chief Justices of the Supreme Court
22(1)
Presidents, Vice Presidents, and Cabinet Members
23(7)
Bibliographies 30(19)
Index 49

Excerpts

This is the second edition ofThese United States: Concise Edition.Like its predecessor, it is a compact version ofThese United States: The Questions of Our Pastand is designed to present all the essentials of the larger work in a briefer format to facilitate readability and reduce the price of the work to the student. The condensing process has not, I believe, sacrificed essential material. Rather, redundant examples, overextended treatments, and marginal topics have been eliminated, a process that drew on reviewers' and adopters' evaluations. And to constrain costs, we have also reduced the number of illustrations and maps and removed the "Portraits" from the main body of the text and placed them in a separate booklet. In most significant ways the books' plan remains the same, however. First, unlike virtually every other introductory text, it still has a single author and speaks in a single voice. I hope readers will agree that a book by a single individual has inherent advantages over one composed by a committee. Second, each chapter is still organized around a significant question, each designed to challenge students with the complexity of the past and compel them to evaluate critically different viewpoints. This plan, I believe, makes the learning of history a quest, an exploration, rather than the mere absorption of facts. Yet, at the same time, "the facts" are made available.These United Statesprovides the ample "coverage" of standard texts. The word "standard" here does not mean old-fashioned. ThoughThese United Statesdiscusses political, diplomatic, and military events, it also deals extensively with social, cultural, and economic matters. It concerns itself not only with "events," moreover, but also with people, currents, and themes. It is not old-fashioned in another way: it expands the "canon" to include those who have traditionally been excluded from the American past and seeks to embrace the enormous diversity of the American people. The reader will find in These United States women as well as men; people of color as well as those of European extraction, youths as well as adults; the poor as well as the rich; artists, writers, and musicians as well as politicians, generals, and diplomats. In this newest version of the work, I have added sections on various aspects of social history, particularly on slavery, on the Salem witch trials, and on daily life. I have also extended the story through the events of 2000 and 2001, including the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks, the war on terrorism, and the collapse of the "bubble" economy of the 1990s. I hope that, like its precursors, this edition meets with favor among faculty and students and serves both as a successful teaching instrument and an absorbing introduction to the American past. Irwin Unger Department of History, Emeritus New York University


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