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Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780801487767

ISBN10:
0801487765
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
11/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Cornell Univ Pr

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 11/1/2002.
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Summary

Praise for the first edition: "Every once in a while a book appears that treats the leading issues of a subject in such a clear and challenging manner that it becomes central to understanding that subject. Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice is just such a book. . . . Donnelly's interpretations are clear and argued with zest."-American Political Science Review "This wide-ranging book looks at all aspects of human rights, drawing upon political theory, sociology, and international relations as well as international law. . . . [Jack Donnelly] deals successfully with two of the principal challenges to the notion of the universality of human rights: the argument that some non-Western societies are not subject to Western norms, and the claim that economic development may require the sacrifice of some human rights."-Foreign Affairs In a thoroughly revised edition of Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice (more than half of the material is new), Jack Donnelly elaborates a theory of human rights, addresses arguments of cultural relativism, and explores the efficacy of bilateral and multilateral international action. Entirely new chapters address prominent post-Cold War issues including humanitarian intervention, democracy and human rights, "Asian values," group rights, and discrimination against sexual minorities.

Table of Contents

Preface to the Second Edition ix
Introduction 1(6)
Part I. Toward a Theory of Universal Human Rights
The Concept of Human Rights
7(15)
How Rights ``Work''
7(3)
Special Features of Human Rights
10(3)
Human Rights and Human Nature
13(5)
The Question of Foundations
18(4)
The Universal Declaration Model
22(16)
The Universal Declaration Model
23(1)
Individual Rights
23(4)
Interdependence and Indivisibility
27(6)
The State and International Human Rights
33(5)
Equal Concern and Respect
38(19)
Hegemony and Settled Norms
38(2)
An Overlapping Consensus on International Human Rights
40(1)
Moral Theory, Political Theory, and Human Rights
41(2)
Equal Concern and Respect
43(3)
Toward a Liberal Theory of Human Rights
46(5)
Consensus: Overlapping but Bounded
51(6)
Part II. Cultural Relativism and International Human Rights
Markets, States, and ``The West''
57(14)
The Evolution of Lists of Human Rights
57(1)
Markets, States, and Political Equality
58(2)
Expanding the Subjects and Substance of Human Rights
60(1)
Linking ``The West'' and Human Rights
61(3)
States, Citizens, and the Legal Order
64(1)
Economic and Social Rights and the Welfare State
64(1)
Inside, Outside, and the Society of States
65(2)
Global Markets
67(2)
Historical Analysis and the Genetic Fallacy
69(2)
Non-Western Conceptions of Human Rights
71(18)
Islam and Human Rights
72(4)
The Premodern West
76(2)
Traditional Africa
78(1)
Traditional Confucian China
79(2)
Caste and Human Rights
81(3)
The Relevance of Human Rights
84(2)
Culture and Human Rights
86(3)
Cultural Relativism and Universal Human Rights
89(18)
Defining Cultural Relativism
89(1)
Relativity and Universalism: A Necessary Tension
90(2)
Internal Versus External Judgments
92(1)
Concepts, Interpretations, Implementations
93(6)
Explaining the Persistence of Culturalist Arguments
99(1)
Culture and Politics
100(3)
Dialogue over Real Differences
103(4)
Human Rights and ``Asian Values''
107(20)
Sovereignty and International Human Rights
108(1)
The Demands of Development
109(1)
Economic and Social Rights
110(2)
Individuals and Society
112(2)
Rights and Duties
114(1)
Traditional Order and Human Rights
115(4)
Human Rights and ``Asian Values''
119(8)
Part III. Human Rights and International Action
International Human Rights Regimes
127(28)
International Regimes
127(2)
The Global Human Rights Regime
129(6)
Political Foundations of the Global Regime
135(3)
Regional Human Rights Regimes
138(7)
Single-Issue Human Rights Regimes
145(6)
The Evolution of Human Rights Regimes
151(4)
Human Rights and Foreign Policy
155(18)
Human Rights: A Legitimate Concern of Foreign Policy?
155(4)
International Human Rights and National Identity
159(3)
Trade-offs
162(2)
Choice of Means
164(2)
The Purposes of International Human Rights Policies
166(2)
Selectivity and Consistency
168(3)
Toward More Effective International Human Rights Policies
171(2)
The Priority of National Action
173(12)
The Limits of Multilateral Action
173(4)
The Limits of Bilateral Action
177(2)
The Limits of International Action
179(6)
Part IV. Essays on Contemporary Theory and Practice
Democracy, Development, and Human Rights
185(19)
The Contemporary Language of Legitimacy
186(2)
Defining Democracy
188(3)
Democracy and Human Rights
191(3)
Defining Development
194(2)
Development-Rights Trade-offs
196(3)
Development and Civil and Political Rights
199(1)
Markets and Economic and Social Rights
200(2)
The Liberal Democratic Welfare State
202(2)
Group Rights and Human Rights
204(21)
Individual and Community
204(1)
Liberal Approaches to Group Difference
205(3)
Group Human Rights: A Skeptical View
208(3)
Women
211(1)
Minorities
212(2)
Protecting Group Identity
214(1)
Indigenous Peoples
215(2)
Group Rights in a Human Rights Framework
217(1)
Cultural Rights
218(2)
A Right to Cultural Identity
220(1)
Appendix: The Right of Peoples to Self-Determination
221(4)
Nondiscrimination for All: The Case of Sexual Minorities
225(17)
The Right to Nondiscrimination
225(2)
Nondiscrimination and Political Struggle
227(2)
Discrimination against Sexual Minorities
229(4)
Nature, (Im)Morality, and Public Morals
233(4)
Strategies for Inclusion
237(5)
Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention
242(19)
Intervention and International Law
242(1)
Humanitarian Intervention and International Law
243(1)
The Moral Standing of the State
244(3)
Politics, Partisanship, and International Order
247(2)
Changing Conceptions of Security and Sovereignty
249(2)
Justifying the Antigenocide Norm
251(1)
Changing Legal Practices
252(2)
``Justifying'' Humanitarian Intervention
254(1)
Mixed Motives and the Problem of Consistency
255(2)
Politics and the Authority to Intervene
257(1)
Judging the Kosovo Intervention
258(3)
References 261(26)
Index 287


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