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The Universal Right to Education: Justification, Definition, and Guidelines,9780805835472
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The Universal Right to Education: Justification, Definition, and Guidelines

by
ISBN13:

9780805835472

ISBN10:
0805835474
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
4/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Lawrence Erlbau

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the edition with a publication date of 4/1/2000.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Summary

In this book, Joel Spring offers a powerful and closely reasoned justification and definition for the universal right to education--applicable to all cultures--as provided for in Article 26 of the United Nation's Universal Declaration of Human Rights. One sixth of the world's population, nearly 855 million people, are functionally illiterate, and 130 million children in developing countries are without access to basic education. Spring argues that in our crowded global economy, educational deprivation has dire consequences for human welfare. Such deprivation diminishes political power. Education is essential for providing citizens with the tools for resisting totalitarian and repressive governments and economic exploitation. What is to be done? The historically grounded, highly original analysis and proposals Spring sets forth in this book go a long way toward answering this urgent question. Spring first looks at the debates leading up to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, to see how the various writers dealt with the issue of cultural differences. These discussions provide a framework for examining the problem of reconciling cultural differences with universal concepts. He next expands on the issue of education and cultural differences by proposing a justification for education that is applicable to indigenous peoples and minority cultures and languages. This justification is then applied to all people within the current global economy. Acknowledging that the right to an education is inseparable from children's rights, he uses the concept of a universal right to education to justify children's rights, and, in turn, applies his definition of children's liberty rights to the concept of education. His synthesis of cultural, language, and children's rights provides the basis for a universal justification and definition for the right to education -- which, in the concluding chapters, Spring uses to propose universal guidelines for human rights education, and instruction in literacy, numeracy, cultural centeredness, and moral economy.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Justifying Human and Educational Rights
1(18)
Universal Justification, Definition, and Guidelines for the Right to Education
2(1)
The Right to Education
3(3)
Finding a Justification and Definition for ``Everyone Has the Right to Education''
6(3)
``Is There Anything Surprising in Systems Antagonistic in Theory Converging in the Practical Conclusions?''
9(2)
The Socialist State and the Universal Right to Education
11(2)
Cultural Differences and Universal Rights
13(3)
Conclusion: Searching for the Meaning of Education as a Human Right
16(3)
Justifying a Universal Right to Education For Indigenous and Minority Cultures
19(20)
Colonialism and the Development of a World System
20(3)
Minority and Indigenous Cultures in Multicultural Societies
23(2)
Elkin's Manifesto on Cultural and Educational Rights
25(2)
Human Rights and the End of the Colonial System
27(2)
The 1960 Convention Against Discrimination in Education
29(1)
A Universal Covenant of Linguistic Human Rights
30(2)
Are Cultural and Linguistic Rights in Conflict with Universal Human Rights?
32(3)
The Educational Rights of Indigenous Peoples
35(2)
Conclusion: Justifying the Right to Education in the Context of the Genocide of Indigenous Peoples and Colonialism
37(2)
The Right to Education in a Global Culture and Economy
39(16)
The Evolution of a World System
39(3)
McCulture and the Hybridization of World Cultures
42(3)
Economic Development and the Instrumental Use of Culture
45(2)
Development, Cultural Freedom, and Justification of the Right to Education
47(1)
Global Ethics and the Right to Education
47(3)
Biodiversity, Education, and Human Rights
50(3)
Conclusion: The Right to Education for the Privileged
53(2)
Universal Justification for Education and Children's Rights
55(21)
The Condition of the World's Children
55(5)
Children's Rights Assistance and Protection Rights
60(4)
Convention on the Rights of the Child: Liberty Rights
64(1)
Cultural Differences and the Best Interests of the Child
65(1)
Sub-Saharan Africa: Children's Rights
66(4)
Indian and Sir Lanka: Children's Rights and Education
70(2)
Children's Rights and Educational Exploitation
72(2)
Conclusion: Justification for the Universal Right to an Education and Children's Rights
74(2)
A Universal Concept of Education: Human Rights Education and Moral Duties
76(38)
The United Nations' Decade For Human Rights Education
78(8)
Protection of Human Rights as a Claim Right
86(3)
The Moral Imperative of Human Rights: Guilt and Shame
89(1)
All Human Beings ... Manual for Human Rights Education
89(1)
Democracy and Education
90(3)
``Nationalistic'' and Uncritical Human Rights Education
93(4)
Culture and Human Rights Education
97(4)
Critical Thought and Human Relations Education
101(3)
Let Our Children Dream About a Perfect World of Rights
104(2)
Critical Dialogue About Human Rights Education
106(5)
Conclusion: Universal Guidelines for Human Rights Education
111(3)
A Universal Concept of Education: Guidelines for Literacy and Numeracy Instruction
114(17)
Universal Guidelines for Literacy Instruction
115(5)
Universal Guide to Numeracy Instruction
120(7)
A Universal Concept of Education
127(2)
Conclusion: Literacy and Numeracy as Methods for Reflecting on the Good Life
129(2)
Mediating the Effects of World Culture and Economy
131(26)
The Meaning of Cultural Centeredness
132(7)
Centering a Culture: Language
139(4)
Cultural Centeredness and Cultural Values
143(3)
Cultural Centeredness in a Managed Culture
146(1)
Economic Unity and Understanding the Global Economy
147(2)
Economic Morality: The Search for the Good Life
149(6)
Conclusion: Culture and Economics
155(2)
Summary: The Universal Right to Education
157(8)
Justification
157(1)
Education and Children's Rights
158(1)
Liberty and Education Rights
158(1)
Nondiscrimination and the Right to Education
159(1)
Culture, Language, and Education Rights
159(1)
Environmental Destruction and the Right to Education
159(1)
Human Rights and a Universal Concepts of Education
160(1)
Universal Minimum Guidelines for Literacy Instruction
161(1)
Universal Minimum Gudelines for Numeracy Instruction
162(1)
Cultrual Centeredness, Moral Economy, and Social Imagination
162(3)
Notes 165(14)
Index 179


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