9780810118874

The Unwelcome One: Returning Home from Auschwitz

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  • ISBN13:

    9780810118874

  • ISBN10:

    0810118874

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-02-01
  • Publisher: Northwestern Univ Pr
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Summary

Before the war, there had been eleven Jewish families, fifty people in all, in the small German town of Schmallenberg. But when Hans Frankenthal returned in 1945 at the age of nineteen, orphaned and robbed of his youth by the Nazis, he found that all the Jews of Schmallenberg had disappeared -- no one who remained was interested in what had happened to them or to him. Here, Frankenthal tells his story of the horrors of the Holocaust survived by one man, and its aftermath.

Summoning the vanished world of Jewish livestock dealers in rural Germany, the milieu of his boyhood, Frankenthal paints a clear picture of what it was like to live as a Jew in a small German town before and after the Nazis came to power. He gives a harrowing account of his family's deportation to Auschwitz and of his "life" and his brother's as slave laborers in an I.G. Farben factory near the death camp where his parents perished. When, acting on his father's last words to him, Frankenthal returns to his hometown, we get a rare firsthand look at the postwar experience of a Jewish survivor

Author Biography

Hans Frankenthal was born in 1926 in Schmallenberg in the Sauerland region of Germany. In 1943, his family was deported to Auschwitz, where his parents were sent at once to the gas chambers. Hans and his brother Ernst survived slave labor in the Monowitz and Mittelbau Dora concentration camps. Liberated by the red army in 1945, Frankenthal returned to Schmallenberg, where he ran a butcher's shop and worked as a livestock dealer. Today he is a member of the Regional Association of the Jewish Communities of Westphalia and Lippe and the Central Council of Jews in Germany. He is also Deputy Chairman of the Auschwitz Committee in the Federal Republic of Germany.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Biographical Note to German Edition xi
PART I
``Where Is Schmallenberg?''
3(1)
The Boycott
4(2)
Our Jewish Home
6(2)
My Childhood in Schmallenberg
8(3)
The Sports Festival
11(2)
Losing My Friends
13(2)
The First Arrests
15(2)
The Pogrom
17(2)
``I Would Never Have Believed What the Germans Are Capable Of''
19(2)
My Bar Mitzvah
21(2)
The ``Jews' Houses''
23(1)
``Wheels Have to Roll to Win the War....''
24(4)
In Broad Daylight
28(2)
In Cattle Cars to the East
30(2)
The End of the Line---Auschwitz
32(2)
Monowitz
34(2)
The First Day in the Camp
36(2)
Kommando 12
38(1)
Extermination by Work
39(2)
The Evening Roll Call
41(2)
Nighttime
43(1)
Ede Besch
44(2)
The SS
46(2)
Buttonholes, Shoes, and Cement Bags
48(2)
Barracks-Room Assistants
50(2)
The Commandant's Dog
52(1)
First Contacts with the Resistance
53(2)
The Resistance
55(1)
Sabotage
56(1)
The Stonemason-Training Kommando
57(2)
The Infirmary
59(1)
Selection
60(2)
Medical Experimentation on Human Beings
62(1)
``After Us It's Their Turn!''
63(1)
The Death March
64(3)
The Cold Hell
67(2)
The Escape
69(2)
In Captivity Again
71(1)
Liberation
72(3)
PART II
The Return Trip
75(1)
Arrival in Schmallenberg
75(1)
First Encounters
76(2)
Aunt Hedwig
78(2)
Stumbling Blocks
80(2)
Denazification in Schmallenberg
82(2)
Registering with the Police
84(2)
Confrontations
86(3)
Starting a Family
89(2)
The Children of the Survivors
91(2)
Ernst
93(1)
The Knee Operation
94(1)
``Reparations''
95(2)
A Very Ordinary Citizen of Schmallenberg
97(2)
The Trial in Frankfurt
99(2)
A Letter from Poland
101(1)
The Children Grow Up
101(3)
How It All Started Over Again
104(2)
The Memorial Stone
106(1)
The Long Silence of Amtsinspektor Holthaus
107(4)
The Brochure
111(2)
Moving to Dortmund
113(3)
An Unexpected Reunion
116(2)
Visiting Auschwitz
118(2)
The Trial in Siegen
120(1)
Another Attempt at a Memorial
121(1)
The Lahrmann Company
122(1)
1995: Fifty Years after My Liberation
123(4)
Afterword 127(12)
Translator's Notes 139(8)
Glossary 147

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