9780415701419

Urban and Regional Technology Planning: Planning Practice in the Global Knowledge Economy

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  • ISBN13:

    9780415701419

  • ISBN10:

    0415701414

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 2006-07-27
  • Publisher: Routledge
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Summary

Part of the popular Networked Cities series, Urban and Regional Technology Planningfocuses on the practice of relational planning and the stimulation of local city-regional scale development planning in the context of the global knowledge economy and network society. Designed to offer scholars, practitioners, and decision makers studies on the ways of cities, technologies, and multiple forms of urban movement intersect and create the contemporary urban environment, Kenneth Corey and Mark Wilson explore the dynamics of technology-induced change that is taking place within the context of the global knowledge economy and network society. Examining first the knowledge economy itself, Wilson and Corey go on to discuss its implications before proposing ways to strategize for future intelligent development, with particular emphasis on the ALERT model for regional and local planning. An important read for those practicing or studying planning in this network society.

Author Biography

Kenneth Corey is Professor in the Department of Geography and the Urban and Regional Planning Program of Michigan State University Mark Wilson is Associate Professor in the Urban and Regional Planning Program of the School of Planning, Design and Construction and the Department of Geography at Michigan State University

Table of Contents

List of Figures
xii
Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xiv
General Introduction 1(4)
Part I Change
5(30)
Introduction
7(5)
The Knowledge Economy
12(7)
Structural Change
14(5)
Industry
14(1)
Occupation
15(2)
Education
17(2)
The Role of Information and Communication Technology
19(11)
Access to ICT
21(2)
Information Technology Infrastructure
23(4)
Responding to ICT
27(3)
Place, Space and ICT
30(2)
Issues for the Knowledge Economy
32(2)
Conclusion
34(1)
Part II Concepts
35(34)
Key Concepts and their Roots
37(3)
From Digital Development to Intelligent Development
37(1)
Digital Development
38(1)
Intelligent Development
38(1)
Background for Relational Conceptualizing -- The Legacy of Jean Gottmann
38(2)
Challenges
40(4)
Challenges for the Practice of Planning Today and Tomorrow
40(1)
The Challenge of the Need for the Integration of Spatial and Socio-economic Planning
40(1)
The Challenge of the Need for Planning Theories to Meet the Needs of Planning Practitioners
41(1)
The Challenge of the Need to Rejustify Government Intervention
42(1)
The Challenge of Creating a New Mindset for Planning
42(2)
Concept to Action
44(21)
Actions for Planners to Take
44(1)
Conceptual and Theoretical Frameworks for New Planning Practice
44(1)
Relations and Processes: The e-Business Spectrum as a Functionally-based Organizing Framework
45(7)
Production Functions
47(1)
Consumption Functions
48(1)
Amenity and Quality-of-Life Factors
49(3)
Space and Time: Moving Theory into Planning Practice
52(8)
Space: Working Composite Spatial Construct of Local Economic Development
53(1)
Space: Theory Integration, Benchmarking and Measurement
54(3)
Time: Relational Program Planning
57(1)
Time: The Moment is Important in Planning Practice
58(1)
Time: Path Dependence
59(1)
Time: Evolution and Maturation
59(1)
Timelessness
60(1)
Future Time: Global Planning and Futures Context
60(1)
Multiple Layers: A Spatial Relational Planning Framework Hierarchy
60(3)
Power of Agency: Transforming Digital Development into Intelligent Development
63(2)
Power of Agency: Development -- The Values Imperative
63(1)
Power of Agency: Mediating Power Layers and Planning Scenarios
64(1)
Old and New Mindset
65(4)
Some Lost Traditions of Planning
65(1)
New Planning and Old Planning
66(3)
Part III Context
69(28)
Introduction
71(2)
Context: The Three Global Technology-economic Regions
73(2)
North America
75(9)
Canada
75(5)
Innovation Systems
76(2)
Kitchener--Waterloo Region
78(1)
Maritime Region
79(1)
Difference and Similarity
80(1)
United States
80(4)
Your Region Is Not Silicon Valley
81(1)
The Metropolitan Region of Portland, Oregon
82(1)
Michigan and its City-regions as a Surrogate for the United States
83(1)
Eastern Asia
84(7)
Japan, Singapore and Asia
84(7)
Eastern Asia: Evolution and Maturation
86(1)
Latecomer Policies: The Case of Taiwan
87(1)
Asian Relational Theory and Philosophy
88(1)
Asia or Many Asias
89(2)
Western Europe
91(6)
Skovde
92(1)
Sophia Antipolis
92(1)
Benevento
93(1)
Lessons from Europe in Strategic Spatial Governance
93(1)
Globalization Influences on Contemporary Planning Practice
94(3)
Part IV ALERT: A Model for Regional and Local Planning Practice in the Global Knowledge Economy and Network Society
97(90)
Convergence in Place
99(2)
From Digital Development to Intelligent Development
101(3)
Relational Planning: The Conceptual and Organizational Basis for Intelligent Development
101(3)
What Do We Do Next?
101(1)
Development
102(1)
Digital Development
102(1)
Intelligent Development
102(2)
Stakeholders: Actors and Roles
104(4)
ALERT Model
108(26)
Background to the ALERT Model
108(1)
Theory of the ALERT Model
108(26)
The Model
110(2)
Awareness
112(2)
Layers
114(12)
e-Business Spectrum
126(2)
Responsiveness
128(3)
Talk
131(3)
Beyond Talk: New Mindset, Governance, Practice, Equity, Surveys and Scenarios
134(5)
From Actionable Knowledge to Willing Intentions into Realization
135(1)
Surveys
136(1)
Planning Scenarios
137(2)
Cases of Planning Scenarios
139(28)
Scenario 1: Planning Scenario for Training Regional and Local Planners in East Central Michigan
140(4)
Charrette Workshop Process
140(2)
Results and Priorities
142(1)
Continuation of Planning Scenario Development for the City-region
143(1)
Scenario 2: A Research Planning Scenario for the East Central Michigan City-region
144(1)
Scenario 3: Applying Spatial Economic Development Theory to Southeast Asia
145(2)
Scenario 4: Toward Good e-Governance in Southeast Asia
147(5)
Setting the Context
147(1)
Action Framework and Elements for an e-Governance Planning Scenario
148(1)
Equity
148(1)
Human Capital and Enterprise Culture
149(1)
Governance and Mindset Change
149(2)
Policies Planning and Policies Evaluation
151(1)
Scenario 5: Suburban Regional Planning -- The Case of Gyeonggi Province, Republic of South Korea
152(4)
Scenario 6: Scenario Planning as a Means of Generating Development Alternatives -- The Case of the Relocation of the Capital of the Republic of Korea
156(6)
The Issue and the Problem
156(1)
The Design and Intention
157(1)
Knowledge Exploration
157(1)
Planning Scenario Construction to Produce Options and Alternative Policies
158(4)
Scenario 7: A Local European Application -- The Isle of Wight, England
162(3)
Stakeholders in England Engage in Action Learning for Planning
162(3)
Scenario 8: The Future of European Regions -- A Continental Scale Scenario
165(2)
Policies Change
167(2)
Continuous Learning
169(2)
Practicing Relational Planning: By Practitioner-planners and Academic Practitioner-planners
171(6)
Central Theme of the Book
172(5)
The Challenge of Scholarship, and Constructing and Offering Relational Planning Education Opportunities
172(1)
Planning Education
173(3)
Toward a Global Planning Practice Learning Community
176(1)
The Profile of the Relational Planner-practitioner
177(1)
The Successful Relational Planning Practitioner Will Use the Five Fundamental Relational Planning Lessons and Evaluate the Outcomes of the ALERT Model Process
178(2)
Applying Relational Planning to a Nonrelational Planning World
180(1)
Some Final Cautions
181(2)
Epilogue: New Opportunities and Challenges for Planning Improvement
183(4)
PART V Support
187(53)
Relational Planning Concepts, A--Z
189(32)
Gottmann Concepts, A--Z
221(7)
Planning Activities by Phase of the ALERT Model
228(7)
Outline of a Planning Scenario Approach to the Biosciences and the Program Planning Model in East Central Michigan Planning and Development Region (ECMPDR) by Karan Singh, 2004
235(2)
A Time-relational Method: The Program Planning Model
237(3)
References 240(18)
Index 258

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