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Validated Practices for Teaching Students With Diverse Needs and Abilities,9780205306282
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Validated Practices for Teaching Students With Diverse Needs and Abilities

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780205306282

ISBN10:
0205306284
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $105.33
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  • Validated Practices for Teaching Students with Diverse Needs and Abilities
    Validated Practices for Teaching Students with Diverse Needs and Abilities




Summary

Dedicated to research-based practices only (as opposed to opinion-based practices), this text provides in-depth coverage of validated methods that may be applied to teaching across all the content areas. The authors emphasize effective teaching behaviors regardless of the content being taught. This book helps bridge the research-to-practice gap, and includes: Less is More Approach Limiting content to validated practices results in more thorough descriptions of the selected practices than what is typically found in methods books. Models The organizational structure of the book reflects the sequential process involved in effective teaching and learning (i.e., Planning Instruction, Delivering Instruction, and Evaluating Student and Teacher Performance). Formative review questions are provided after Chapters 3, 7, and 10, and a summative review is provided after Chapter 10 to promote synthesis and retention of important concepts. Each chapter is organized to model effective pedagogy. Overarching Themes The content is grounded in overarching themes (i.e., student diversity, importance of quality instruction, technology applications, and career-long learning among teachers) that reflect accurate understandings of current school contexts.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xv
PART ONE PLANNING INSTRUCTION
Understanding School Context and Student Diversity
1(32)
Advance Organizer
2(1)
The Educational Reform Movement
2(8)
AMERICA 2000: An Education Strategy
3(1)
The SCANS Report for AMERICA 2000
3(1)
National Education Summit Policy Statement
4(1)
National Education Goals Report
5(2)
Standards-Based Reform and Special Education
7(2)
Special Education Service Delivery Reform
9(1)
Student Diversity
10(19)
Students with Disabilities
10(9)
Students Who Are Gifted and Talented
19(1)
Students from Diverse Cultural and Linguistic Backgrounds
20(2)
Students from Diverse Socioeconomic Families
22(4)
Students Who Are Gay or Lesbian
26(3)
Education in the Twenty-First Century
29(1)
References
29(4)
Using Specific Planning Methods
33(48)
Advance Organizer
34(3)
Comprehensive Planning: Flow of the Planning Process Model
37(2)
Teacher Planning Processes
39(23)
The Planning Pyramid
40(6)
ReflActive Planning
46(11)
Literacy Planning Processes
57(5)
Team Planning Processes
62(8)
McGill Action Planning System
63(1)
Choosing Options and Accommodations for Children (COACH)
64(1)
Life-style Planning
65(3)
Student Planning Process
68(2)
Student Self-Advocacy
70(6)
Selecting Planning Processes
76(1)
Practice Activities
77(1)
Post-Organizer
78(1)
References
78(3)
Organizing the Learning Environment
81(56)
Advance Organizer
82(1)
Psychosocial Dimension
83(21)
Create a Positive Classroom Environment
83(1)
Consider the Importance of Making Students Feel Accepted
84(1)
Establish a Behavior-Management Program
85(17)
Positive Behavioral Support for Students with Disabilities
102(2)
Procedural Dimension
104(13)
Manage Time Effectively
104(7)
Manage Instructional Materials and Paperwork
111(6)
Physical Dimension
117(4)
Seating Arrangements
117(3)
Special Activity Areas
120(1)
Personnel Dimension
121(10)
Coteaching Models for General and Special Education Teachers
122(2)
Paraeducators
124(7)
Practice Activities
131(1)
Post-Organizer
131(1)
References
131(6)
PART TWO DELIVERING INSTRUCTION
Selecting Instructional Models
137(52)
Review of Chapters 1 to 3
138(1)
Advance Organizer
139(1)
The Explicit Instruction Model
139(9)
Provide Advance Organizer
140(3)
Describe and Demonstrate
143(1)
Provide Guided Practice
144(2)
Provide Independent Practice
146(1)
Provide Post-Organizer
147(1)
The Direct Instruction Model
148(8)
Instructional Design
148(3)
Presentation Techniques
151(2)
Instructional Organization
153(1)
Direct Instruction and Videodisc Technology
153(3)
The Strategy Instruction Model
156(18)
The Learning Strategy Curriculum
156(7)
Content Enhancement Series
163(1)
Strategic Math Series
164(4)
Strategic Written Expression Models
168(6)
Keyword, Pegword, and Symbolic Representation Strategies
174(3)
Synthesis and Integration of the Models
177(5)
Similarities and Differences among the Models
178(1)
Situated Congnition and Explicit Instruction
179(1)
Advance Organizers and Direct Instruction
179(1)
Strategy and Content Instruction
180(1)
Direct Instruction and Strategy Instruction
181(1)
Practice Activities
182(1)
Post-Organizer
183(1)
References
183(6)
Using Effective Teaching Behaviors
189(46)
Advance Organizer
190(1)
Teacher Effectiveness for Beginning the Lesson
190(4)
Obtain Students' Attention
190(1)
Spark Student Interest through Teacher Enthusiasm
191(1)
Communicate Expectations for Participation
192(1)
Consider Necessary Prerequisite Skills
193(1)
Teacher Effectiveness for Continuing the Lesson
194(20)
Provide Clear and Focused Instruction
195(1)
Use Content Enhancements
196(9)
Keep Students Actively Engaged in the Lesson
205(9)
Teacher Effectiveness for Ending the Lesson
214(13)
Provide Practice Opportunities
214(1)
Student and Teacher Perceptions about Homework and Class Assignments
215(2)
Review of Recommended Homework Practices
217(1)
Strategies for Improving Independent Practice Assignments
218(3)
Provide Feedback on In-Class and Homework Assignments
221(6)
Teacher Effectiveness and Personal Belief Systems
227(1)
Practice Activities
228(1)
Post-Organizer
229(1)
References
229(6)
Facilitating Various Instructional Arrangements
235(52)
Advance Organizer
236(1)
Peer Tutoring Arrangements
236(10)
Rationale for Using Peer Turoring
237(2)
Classwide Peer Tutoring Programs
239(5)
Individualized Peer Tutoring Programs
244(1)
Guidelines for Implementing Peer Tutoring
245(1)
Cooperative Learning Arrangements
246(11)
Rationale for Using Cooperative Learning
248(2)
Cooperative Learning Models
250(4)
Preparing Students to Succed in Cooperative Learning Arrangements
254(3)
Guidelines for Implementing Cooperative Learning
257(1)
Computer-Based Arrangements
257(21)
Rationale for Using Computer-Based Instructional Arrangements
259(3)
Using the Computer for Instruction
262(5)
Using the Computer as a Tool
267(8)
Guidelines for Implementing Computer-Based Instructional Arrangements
275(3)
Practice Activities
278(1)
Post-Organizer
278(1)
References
279(8)
Modifying Curriculum and Instruction
287(44)
Advance Organizer
288(1)
Modifications
289(3)
Accommodations
292(7)
Delivery of Instruction
292(1)
Method of Student Performance
293(3)
Method of Assessment
296(3)
Adaptations
299(4)
Multilevel Instruction
300(2)
Curriculum Overlapping
302(1)
Tiered Assignments
303(1)
Student Opinions about Instructional Accommodations and Adaptations
303(2)
Assistive Technology
305(9)
Types of Assistive Technology
306(5)
Assistive Technology Assessment
311(2)
Cultural Sensitivity and Assistive Technology
313(1)
Further Consideration of Cultural and Linguistic Diversity
314(9)
Second-Language Instructional Models
318(2)
Second-Language Instructional Methods
320(1)
Infusing Multicultural Content
321(2)
Guidelines for Addressing Cultural and Linguistic Diversity
323(1)
Universal Design for Curricula and Instruction
323(3)
Practice Activities
326(1)
Post-Organizer
326(1)
References
327(4)
PART THREE EVALUATING STUDENT AND TEACHER PERFORMANCE
Monitoring Student Progress
331(46)
Review of Chapters 4 to 7
332(1)
Advance Organizer
333(1)
Grading Practices
333(9)
Alternative Grading Systems
335(4)
Student Opinions about the Fairness of Report Card Adaptations
339(1)
Grading Responsibility
340(1)
Recommendations for Grading Practices
341(1)
Specific Monitoring Procedures
342(30)
Curriculum-Based Measurement
342(15)
Portfolio Assessment
357(10)
Technology-Assisted Assessment
367(5)
Practice Activities
372(1)
Post-Organzer
372(1)
References
372(5)
Engaging in Professional Growth and Development
377(48)
Advance Organizer
378(1)
Induction and Mentoring Programs
378(3)
Partnership Learning
381(5)
Question Recipes
384(1)
Thinking Devices
385(1)
Cooperative Learning
385(1)
Reflective Learning
385(1)
Experiential Learning
386(1)
Effective Stories
386(1)
Collegial Learning
386(27)
Structured Dialogue
387(1)
Collaborative Problem Solving
388(6)
Collaborative Consultation
394(3)
Specialist Consultation
397(2)
Intervention Assistance Teams
399(2)
Peer Coaching
401(7)
Teacher Study Groups
408(4)
Benefits of Peer Collegiality
412(1)
Action Research
413(2)
Teacher Portfolios
415(3)
Practice Activities
418(1)
Post-Organizer
419(1)
References
419(6)
Maintaining a Positive Focus
425(27)
Advance Organizer
426(1)
Stories about Teachers Who Made a Difference
427(9)
Stories from Students
427(4)
Stories from Teachers
431(5)
What It Takes to Be a Successful Teacher
436(12)
Use Validated Practices
436(3)
Be Persistent and Continually Preserve Student Learning
439(2)
Recognize the Potential for Burnout and Activate Strategies to Prevent It
441(4)
Acknowledge Mistakes and Learn from Them
445(3)
Practice Activities
448(1)
Review of Chapters 8 to 10
448(1)
Text Review and Post-Organizer
449(2)
References
451(1)
Photo Credits 452(1)
Index 453


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