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The Velikovsky Heresies: Worlds in Collision and Ancient Catastrophes Revisited,9781591431398

The Velikovsky Heresies: Worlds in Collision and Ancient Catastrophes Revisited

by
ISBN13:

9781591431398

ISBN10:
1591431395
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/15/2012
Publisher(s):
Inner Traditions
List Price: $15.00

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Summary

A reexamination of Immanuel Velikovsky’s controversial Venus theories in light of new astronomical and archaeological findings

• Provides new evidence from recent space probe missions to support Velikovsky’s theories on the formation of Venus

• Presents recently translated ancient texts from China, Korea, and Japan that uphold the cometlike descriptions of Venus cited by Velikovsky

• Examines evidence of major geomagnetic events in 1500 BCE and 750 BCE that correspond with close passes of the comet Venus and its impact with Mars

• Offers scientific explanations for many disputed aspects of Velikovsky’s theories, such as how Venus could have transformed from a comet into an orbiting planet

Surrounded by controversy even before its publication in 1950, Immanuel Velikovsky’s Worlds in Collision introduced the provocative theory that Venus began as a brilliant comet ejected by Jupiter around 1600 BCE, wreaking chaos on Mars and Earth as it roamed through our solar system prior to settling into its current orbit. Immediately dismissed without any investigation and subject to vicious attacks, Velikovsky’s theory is now poised for reexamination in light of recent astronomical and archaeological findings.

Exploring the key points of Velikovsky’s theories, Laird Scranton presents evidence from recent space probe missions to show that Venus still exhibits cometlike properties, such as its atmospheric composition, and could be a young planet. Reviewing the widespread cometlike descriptions of Venus from 1500 BCE to 750 BCE as well as Velikovsky’s observation that no records of Venus exist prior to 1600 BCE, Scranton reveals recently translated ancient texts from China, Korea, and Japan that further uphold Velikovsky’s theories. Examining evidence of major geomagnetic and climate-change events around 1500 BCE and 750 BCE, corresponding with close passes of the comet Venus and its impact with Mars, the author offers scientific explanations for many disputed aspects of Velikovsky’s theories, such as how Venus transformed from a comet into an orbiting planet. By updating this unresolved controversy with new scientific evidence, Scranton helps us to understand how it was that Worlds in Collision was the one book found open on Albert Einstein’s desk at the time of his death.

Author Biography

Laird Scranton,  an independent software designer, has studied ancient myth, language, and cosmology since 1997. The author of several books, including The Science of the Dogon, he has been a lecturer at Colgate University and lives in Albany, New York.

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments

Introduction: The Irrepressible Outsider


1    Worlds in Collision and the Firestorm It Created

2
    Velikovsky’s Thesis

3
    Reaction and Controversy

4
    Early Predictive Tests of the Theory

5
    Later Developments in the Controversy

6
    Venus in Ancient Times

7
    Could Venus Have Been Ejected from Jupiter?

8
    Could Venus Have Made a Close Approach to Earth?

9
    Could Venus Have Impacted Mars?

10
    Could Mars Have Made a Close Approach to Earth?

11
    What Evidence Is There That Venus Was Out of Its Orbit?

12
    Could Venus Be a Young Planet?

13
    Could Venus Have Been a Comet?

14
    Could the Orbit of Venus Have Circularized So Quickly?

15
    Observations on the New Evidence

Notes

Bibliography

Index


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