9780130812933

Water Resources Engineering

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780130812933

  • ISBN10:

    0130812935

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 12/14/2001
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

Designed to provide an up-to-date broad coverage of pertinent topics concerning water resource engineering. This book focuses on modern computer-based modeling and analysis methods, illustrating recent advances in computer technology and computational methods that have greatly increased capabilities for solving water resources engineering problems.Focuses on fundamental topics of hydraulics, hydrology, and water management. Water resources engineering concepts and methods are addressed from the perspective of practical applications in water management and associated environmental and infrastructure management. The focus is on mathematical modeling and analysis using state-of-the-art computational techniques and computer software.Appropriate as a reference in water resources engineering for practicing engineers.

Author Biography

Wesley P. James has over 40 years of experience in hydraulics, hydrology, and water resources engineering, working in federal agencies, private consulting, and universities Ralph A. Wurbs is a Professor in the Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Division with the Civil Engineering Department, Texas A&M University

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Introduction
1(38)
Water Resources Engineering Disciplines
1(2)
Water Management Sectors
3(15)
The Water Management Community
18(11)
Computer Models in Water Resources Engineering
29(8)
Units of Measure
37(2)
References
38(1)
Hydrology
39(68)
Water
40(4)
Hydroclimatology
44(11)
Atmospheric Processes
55(3)
Precipitation
58(10)
Evaporation and Transpiration
68(8)
Units of Measure for Depth, Area, Volume, and Volumetric Rates
76(4)
Watershed Hydrology and Streamflow
80(9)
Subsurface Water
89(2)
Erosion and Sedimentation
91(1)
Water Quality
92(7)
Climatic, Hydrologic, and Water Quality Data
99(8)
Problems
102(2)
References
104(3)
Fluid Mechanics
107(23)
Units
107(1)
Properties of Water
108(3)
Statics
111(6)
Classification of Fluid Flow
117(1)
Reynolds Transport Theorem
118(1)
Dimensional Analysis
119(4)
Conservation of Mass, Energy, and Momentum
123(2)
Newton-Raphson Formula
125(5)
Problems
126(3)
Bibliography
129(1)
Hydraulics of Pipelines and Pipe Networks
130(122)
Basic Equations for Steady Flow
130(9)
Pumps in Pipelines
139(12)
Culverts
151(5)
Pipelines Connecting Reservoirs
156(9)
Pipe Network Systems
165(33)
Unsteady Flow
198(35)
Generalized Pipe System Simulation Models
233(19)
Problems
234(16)
Bibliography
250(2)
Open Channel Hydraulics
252(104)
Open Channels
252(2)
Flow Classification
254(1)
Uniform Flow
254(7)
Critical Flow
261(5)
Computing Normal and Critical Depth
266(4)
Channel Design
270(9)
Gradually Varied Steady Flow
279(32)
Rapidly Varied Steady Flow
311(13)
Unsteady Flow
324(17)
Generalized Open Channel Hydraulics Models
341(15)
Problems
341(14)
Bibliography
355(1)
Flood Routing
356(52)
Hydrologic Routing
357(12)
Kinematic Routing
369(5)
Hydraulic Stream Routing
374(11)
Dam Break Analysis
385(6)
Watershed Routing
391(7)
Generalized Flood Routing Models
398(10)
Problems
398(8)
References and Bibliography
406(2)
Hydrologic Frequency Analysis
408(54)
Hydrologic Random Variables and Data
408(3)
Probability Relationships
411(1)
Binomial Distribution and Risk Formula
412(3)
Empirical Relative Frequency Relations
415(2)
Analytical Probability Distributions
417(7)
Frequency Graphs
424(2)
Bulletin 17B Flood Frequency Analysis Methodologies
426(6)
Other Flood Frequency Analysis Methods
432(7)
Flow-Duration, Concentration-Duration, and Low-Flow Frequency Relationships
439(4)
Reservoir/River System Reliability
443(2)
Precipitation Frequency Analysis
445(7)
Probable Maximum Storm
452(10)
Problems
455(5)
References
460(2)
Modeling Watershed Hydrology
462(72)
Watershed Hydrology
462(2)
Watershed Models
464(5)
Watershed Characteristics
469(5)
Rational Method for Estimating Peak Flow
474(3)
Separating Precipitation into Abstractions and Runoff
477(11)
Unit Hydrograph Approach for Estimating Flow Rates
488(14)
Erosion and Sediment Yield
502(8)
Water Quality Modeling
510(10)
Generalized Watershed Simulation Models
520(14)
Problems
525(6)
References
531(3)
Groundwater Engineering
534(88)
Subsurface Water
534(4)
Basic Equations of Groundwater Flow
538(19)
Wells
557(19)
Flow Net Analysis
576(8)
Numerical Methods
584(18)
Groundwater Quality
602(7)
Generalized Groundwater Models
609(13)
Problems
610(10)
Bibliography
620(2)
Urban Stormwater Management
622(87)
Stormwater Collection Systems
623(15)
On-Site Detention Basins
638(17)
Regional Detention Facilities
655(8)
Water Quality
663(27)
Flood-Damage Mitigation
690(19)
Problems
697(10)
Bibliography
707(2)
Water Resources Systems Analysis
709(60)
The Systems Philosophy
709(2)
Economic Analysis
711(9)
Simulation of Flood Damage Reduction Systems
720(9)
Simulation and Optimization
729(2)
Linear Programming (LP)
731(20)
Network Flow Programming
751(2)
Zero-One Integer Programming
753(16)
Problems
756(11)
References
767(2)
River Basin Management
769(52)
River Basin Systems
770(1)
Dams, Reservoirs, and Associated Facilities
771(11)
Water Rights and Water Allocation Systems
782(10)
Water Quality Management
792(4)
Ecosystem Management
796(2)
Rivers and Reservoirs of the World
798(4)
Major River/Reservoir Systems in the United States
802(14)
River Basin Management Computer Models
816(5)
References
819(2)
Index 821

Excerpts

Effective management of water resources, locally, regionally, and globally, is crucial for human welfare, economic prosperity, and environmental vitality. The professional field of water resources engineering is concerned with solving problems and meeting needs associated with municipal, industrial, and agricultural water supply and use, water quality in streams and aquifers, erosion and sedimentation, protection of ecosystems and other natural resources, recreation, navigation, hydroelectric power generation, stormwater drainage, and flood damage mitigation. This textbook is designed for a basic course in water resources engineering focusing on fundamental topics of hydraulics, hydrology, and water management. It is also appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses and as a reference for practicing engineers. Water resources engineering concepts and methods are addressed from the perspective of practical applications in water management and associated environmental and infrastructure management. The focus is on mathematical modeling and analysis using state-of-the-art computational techniques and computer software. The book is based largely on the authors'' combined total of more than 40 years experience in teaching the required undergraduate civil engineering course at Texas A&M University entitled Water Resources Engineering and other undergraduate and graduate courses that build on this course. The book reflects ideas formulated by the authors and their colleagues and students for updating and improving these courses. It is designed to provide broad coverage of pertinent topics with flexibility for adaptation to the spectrum of ways that individual courses and sequences of undergraduate and graduate courses are organized at various universities. The first three chapters are introductory overviews of the professional practice of water resources engineering (Chapter 1), the science of hydrology (Chapter 2), and fundamentals of fluid mechanics (Chapter 3). Chapters through 9 each focus on specific aspects of water resources engineering design and analysis, including pressure conduit hydraulics, open channel hydraulics, hydraulic and hydrologic routing, frequency analysis, watershed modeling, and groundwater engineering. In Chapter 10, selected methods from previous chapters are applied to urban stormwater management. Chapter 11 is an introduction to the application of systems simulation, optimization, and economic evaluation techniques in water management decision-making. Chapter 12 introduces practices and issues of comprehensive river basin management. Chapters 1, 2, and 12 provide a broad qualitative overview of hydrology and water resources management. Chapter 3 reviews basic principles of fluid mechanics. The hydrologic and hydraulic analysis concepts and computational methods presented in Chapters 4 through 10 are applied in professional practice as components of computer models that simulate natural and constructed water systems. Chapter 11 integrates economic and systems analysis methods, along with hydrologic and hydraulic engineering methods, in a broader systems view of water resources planning and management. The chapters can be covered in essentially any order, subject to the following considerations. Students using the text will likely have already completed a course in fluid mechanics and may not need Chapter 3. However, because hydraulics is built on fluid mechanics, a brief review of basic fluid mechanics concepts is presented in Chapter 3 prior to addressing hydraulics in depth in Chapters 4-6 and 9-10. The basic overview of hydrology presented in Chapter 2 is prerequisite for Chapter 7, "Hydrologic Frequency Analysis," and Chapter 8, "Modeling Watershed Hydrology," and also provides an introduction for Chapter 9, "Groundwater Engineering." Chapter 10, "Urban Stormwater Management," applies methods from all of the hydrology and hydraulics chapters. Chapter 1 is the only prerequisite chapter for Chapters 11 and 12. Although Chapters 11 and 12 complement each other, either may be covered without the other. Sufficient material is provided for multiple courses, particularly if supplemented by the computer models discussed in the book. The text may be used for courses in hydrology, hydraulics, urban stormwater management, and water systems planning and management, as well as for a fundamental first course in water resources engineering. A set of computer programs developed in conjunction with the text enhances understanding and application of computational methods. Modeling capabilities provided by generalized simulation models developed by federal water agencies and other entities greatly contribute to water resources engineering practice and play an important role in education. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of our students and colleagues at Texas A&M University in shaping our perspectives on the subject matter of this book. We join the publisher in thanking the following reviewers for their thoughtful comments during the development of the manuscript: Paul C. Chan, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Robert D. Kersten, University of Central Florida, and Thomas C. Piechota, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Mrs. Joyce Hyden typed much of the manuscript, proficiently as always. Finally, we thank our wives, Keri and Karen, for their enduring patience and support during the project. RALPH A. WURBS WESLEY P. .LAMES

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