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What Color Is Your Parachute? 2009 : A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers,9781580089302

What Color Is Your Parachute? 2009 : A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers

by
ISBN13:

9781580089302

ISBN10:
1580089305
Format:
Trade Paper
Pub. Date:
10/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Ten Speed Press
List Price: $18.95
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Summary

The #1 best-selling career book of all time, revised and updated to keep pace with today's ever-changing job market. Still the best-selling job-hunting book in the world, WHAT COLOR IS YOUR PARACHUTE? is the most complete guide for first-time job seekers as well as second and encore careers changers. For more than three decades, it remains a mainstay on best-seller lists, from Amazon.com to Business Week to the New York Times, where it has spent more than six years, and it has been translated into 20 languages. The 2009 edition is an even more useful book, with its updated, inspiring, and detailed plan for changing readers'lives. With new examples, instructions, and cautionary advice, PARACHUTE is, to quote Fortune magazine, "the gold standard of career guides." Visit the What Color Is Your Parachute? JOB-HUNTER'S RESOURCE CENTER for video, useful exercises, job-search advice, and more... Reviews http://cbs5.com/consumer/job.hunt.tips.2.960671.html -CBS-5 "Job seekers, don't despair. Richard Bolles is on your side. At 81, his lifes'work has been about how to find a job. And not just any job, but the career of your dreams. Even in a recession."-Sacramento Bee "Chock-full of revisions and tips relevant to today's circumstances."-San Francisco Chronicle "Parachute remains the most complete career guide around . . . It covers all the ground less ambitious guides do, as well as some the others don't, mostly in the realm of the psyche." -Barbara Presley Noble, New York Times "Find success in your job search by picking up a copy of What Color Is Your Parachute?"-Complete Woman "'It's a Wonderful Life'isn't the only classic people will be enjoying this holiday season. Many folks-actually, tens of thousands...-will find a copy of a classic career planning book under the tree...What Color Is Your Parachute?...has been around so long we forget the author...helped define not only an industry, but a national perspective." -St. Paul Pioneer Press as featured in Amy Lindgren's syndicated career column. "A career-advice juggernaut. The best-selling career guide in history, Parachute has sold over nine million copies, spawned a number of ancillary books (including editions for teens and retirees), and was named by the Library of Congress as one of the 25 books that have shaped readers'lives-putting Bolles in the company of Malcolm X, Robert Louis Stevenson and God, whose own Bible is a perennial bestseller." -New York Post "The 2008 edition is full of new suggestions, along with the classic advice that continues to hold true today." -About.com's Job Searching Site Testimonials for What Color is Your Parachute? "I have three Guerrilla books on Amazon best-seller lists of one kind or another, but none are as high quality as Parachute. Hardly anything ever is." -Jay Conrad Levinson, author of Guerrilla Marketing "You've done it again (for me)! Using Parachute, I've landed (1) a super job in an Insanely Great company doing wonderful things and (2) spring-boarded into an even better position just one year later within the same company doing exactly what I've always dreamed of. Make another notch in your book binding (or wherever you keep track of these things) because you've made me a runaway success. Kudos to you and all you continue to do for the job hunter/career changer!" -Jon Copeland, Executive Briefing Center, Apple, Inc. "I am a U.S. Marine serving in Iraqhellip;I have recently finished What Color is Your Parachute?, and I was pleasantly surprised how much I learned about myself. I was also grateful to learn that

Author Biography

RICHARD NELSON BOLLES is the best-selling author of WHAT COLOR IS YOUR PARACHUTE? and has been a leader in the career development field for more than 35 years. He lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Excerpts

Part I
Finding a Job . . .
It was the best of times,
It was the worst of times,
It was the age of wisdom,
It was the age of foolishness,
It was the epoch of belief,
It was the epoch of incredulity,
It was the season of light,
It was the season of darkness,
It was the spring of hope,
It was the winter of despair,
We had everything before us,
We had nothing before us,
We were all going direct to heaven,
We were all going direct the other way . . .

Charles Dickens
A Tale of Two Cities


1. Finding a Job . . . Even in Hard Times:Rejection Shock


Charles Dickens had it right. For some of us, this is the worst of times. Our house has been foreclosed, or seen its value drop dramatically. Fuel costs are killing us. Rice is scarce, and getting scarcer. Food prices are soaring. Businesses are folding. Companies are cutting their work force dramatically. Millions are out of work.

But there are others who are barely touched by any of this. They cannot understand what we are going through. At least 138,000,000 people still have jobs, in the U.S. Some of them, well-paying jobs. They are well off, and in some cases, have money to burn. For them, this is the best of times. They cannot understand our pain.

But we, when we are out of work, go looking for another job; but we, when we are finding it difficult to feed our families, go looking for a better-paying job. And that is when we run into the nature of the job-market, and the nature of the job-hunt. It isn’t as easy as we thought it was going to be.

Tom Jackson has well characterized the nature of the job-hunt as one long process of rejection. In job-interview after job-interview, what some of us hear the employer say is:

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES.

Before we get to that final YES–or if we are lucky, two YESES, so that we have a choice–before we get there, the job-hunt is nothing but one long process of rejection. And we, so unprepared for this, go into a kind of Rejection Shock.

Naturally, we have questions.

I just lost my job. How many others are in the same predicament?

Well, you’ve got lots of company. As of June 2009, the number of people out of work totaled at least 14,500,000 individuals. And that’s a government figure. In the U.S. there are always many more people out of work than the government will ever admit–regardless of which party is in power.

Will I need a computer and Internet access, to go about my job-hunt in this twenty-first century?

It’s not mandatory, and if you don’t have a computer, there are non-Internet job-hunting resources, of course. For example, if because you lack a computer you can’t access Job-Postings by employers on the Internet, you can always look at the Help Wanted Ads in your local newspaper, especially the Sunday edition.

There are also regional papers devoted to nothing but job openings, such asJobDig,which, at this writing, publishes fourteen local weekly newspapers in twelve states, mostly midwestern (from Minnesota down to Texas). A subscription for thirteen weeks costs job-hunters $65. Call 877-456-2344 to see whether or not there’s a local paper covering your part of the country.

According to the latest figures, however, at least 74.7 percent of Americans use the Internet, which adds up to 227 million users. Others, of course, usually have a friend who can go on the Internet for them.

Moreover, if you know how to use a computer but just don’t happen to own one at the moment, many public libraries as well as Internet cafés can let you use their computer for a fee. (To locate the Internet café nearest you, have a friend

Excerpted from What Color Is Your Parachute? 2009: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers by Richard Nelson Bolles
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.


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