9781560228745

Wheat: Ecology and Physiology of Yield Determination

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781560228745

  • ISBN10:

    1560228741

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1999-05-06
  • Publisher: CRC Press

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $253.00 Save up to $25.30
  • Rent Book $227.70
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Discussing the latest processes involved in researching yield generation, Wheat: Ecology and Physiology of Yield Determination will help you design various types of crop production systems for maximum yield. Featuring information on developing high-yielding, low-input, and quality-oriented systems, this book offers you both physiological and ecological approaches that will help you understand the crop as well as increase its production. Discussing aspects of wheat growth for specific regions around the world, Wheat provides you with information that will improve the size and quality of your crops, including: how temperature, vernalization, and the photoperiod affect the development of wheat using the correct amount of nitrogen fertilizers for wheat crops an explanation of the reproduction and nitrogen cycles of wheat how elements and conditions such as lipids, proteins, nitrogen, and climate enhance grain quality estimating and determining optimal sowing dates examining factors that may affect wheat yield-density relationships, such as planting arrangement and date of sowing preventing seed decay and examining effects of mildews and leaf blights examining historical trends of the crop to see what further research needs to be done You'll also receive information on the genetic gains in wheat research that are improving the physiological traits and numerical components of this essential grain. Within Wheat, you'll find data and methods from international experts in the field that will improve the yield and growth of the world's most important crop.

Table of Contents

About the Editors xiii
Contributors xv
Preface xix
PART I: WHEAT PHYSIOLOGY
An Introduction to the to the Physiological-Ecological Analysis of Wheat Yield
3(10)
Gustavo A. Slafer
Emilio H. Satorre
Worldwide Importance of Wheat
3(7)
A Niche for This Book
10(1)
Objectives
11(2)
Wheat Development
13(32)
Daniel J. Miralles
Gustavo A. Slafer
Introduction
13(3)
Dynamics of Initiation and Appearance of Vegetative and Reproductive Organs
16(7)
Effects of Major Factors on the Duration of Developmental Phase
23(10)
Conclusion
33(12)
Physiological and Numerical Components of Wheat Yield
45(22)
James R. Frederick
Philip J. Bauer
Introduction
45(1)
Factors Affecting Kernel Number
46(3)
Factors Affecting Individual Kernel Weight
49(8)
Summary and Strategies for Future Yield Improvement
57(10)
Nitrogen As Determinant of Wheat Growth and Yield
67(18)
Basilio Borghi
Introduction
67(1)
Nitrogen in the Soil
67(2)
Nitrogen Metabolism in the Plant
69(2)
Nitrogen Effects at the Plant and Crop Level
71(2)
Optimization of Nitrogen Fertilization
73(3)
Water Supply and Nitrogen Assimilation
76(1)
Genetic Aspects of Nitrogen Nutrition
77(8)
Grain Quality and Its Physiological Determinants
85(38)
Peter J. Stone
Roxana Savin
Introduction
85(2)
What Makes Wheat So Special? -The Wheat Proteins
87(10)
The Nonprotein Components of the Wheat Grain
97(3)
How Do Wheat Grains Grow?
100(7)
Grain Quality Is the Result of Interactions Between Grain Components
107(7)
Conclusion
114(9)
PART II: WHEAT ECOLOGY
Effects of Sowing Date and the Determination of Optimum Sowing Date
123(18)
Mike D. Dennett
Introduction
123(1)
Sowing and Establishment
124(1)
Growth and Development
125(1)
Maturation and Harvest
126(1)
Experimental Estimation of Optimum Sowing Dates
127(1)
Wheat in England
128(3)
Wheat in Australia
131(1)
Other Regions
132(1)
Determination of Optimal Sowing Dates
133(8)
Plant Density and Distribution as Modifiers of Growth and Yield
141(20)
Emilio H. Satorre
Introduction
141(1)
Ecophysiological Basis of Density Response
142(5)
The Effect of Resources on Crop Density Response
147(2)
The Effect of Sowing Date and Plant Arrangement
149(3)
Mathematical Relationships Between Plant Yield and Density
152(2)
Concluding Remarks
154(7)
Wheat Yield As Affected by Weeds
161(22)
Robert J. Froud-Williams
Introduction
161(1)
Weeds of Wheat
161(1)
Yield Losses
162(2)
Competition
164(6)
Justification for Weed Removal
170(1)
Effects on Yield Components and Grain Quality
171(1)
Phytotoxic Effects of Herbicides
172(11)
Wheat Growth, Yield, and Quality As Affected by Insect Herbivores
183(46)
Victor O. Sadras
Alberto Fereres
Roger H. Ratcliffe
Introduction
183(2)
Yield Responses to Herbivory
185(1)
Functional Classification of Herbivores
186(1)
Key Pests
187(18)
Other Pests
205(2)
Population-Level Responses to Herbivory
207(4)
Concluding Remarks
211(18)
Wheat Yield As Affected by Diseases
229(10)
Erlei Melo Reis
Carlos A. Medeiros
Marta M. Casa Blum
Introduction
229(1)
Physiological Processes Interrupted by Wheat Pathogens
229(6)
Diversion of Foodstuffs to Abnormal Uses (Bunt and Smuts)
235(1)
Scab--An Exception
236(3)
Wheat As a Polyculture Component
239(24)
Santiago J. Sarandon
Introduction
239(2)
How to Measure Intercropping Performance
241(3)
Effect of Mixtures on Plant Diseases
244(3)
Effect of Mixtures on Resource Use
247(5)
Effect of Mixtures on Grain Quality
252(1)
Intercropping Wheat with Other Species
253(1)
The Evaluation of Genotypes for Intercropping
254(1)
Future Research Needs
255(1)
Concluding Remarks
255(8)
PART III: WHEAT PRODUCTION SYSTEMS
Wheat Production in the Great Plains of North America
263(14)
William R. Raun
Gordon V. Johnson
Robert L. Westerman
Jeffory A. Hattey
Introduction
263(1)
Description of Wheat Production Systems
264(7)
Technological Factors That have Increased Grain Yields in This Century
271(1)
Transformation of Wheat Production Systems in the Future
272(5)
Wheat Cropping in Australia
277(18)
Ralph A. Fischer
Introduction
277(1)
Wheat Climate and Soils
277(3)
Historic Changes in Wheat Yield
280(3)
Recent Changes in Wheat Yield
283(1)
Current Situation of Wheat Farming
284(3)
Challenges to Productivity Gain
287(3)
Wheat Research and Extension
290(1)
Future Perspectives
291(4)
Wheat Production in Mediterranean Environments
295(38)
Edmundo H. Acevedo
Paola C. Silva
Hernan R. Silva
Boris R. Solar
The Mediterranean Climate
295(1)
Wheat in Mediterranean Environments
295(11)
Rotations
306(4)
Germplasm
310(13)
Concluding Remarks
323(10)
Wheat Production Systems of the Pampas
333(18)
Emilio H. Satorre
Gustavo A. Slafer
Introduction
333(2)
Climate and Soils: Major Constraints for Wheat Production
335(2)
Wheat Production Systems
337(6)
Future Perspectives
343(8)
PART IV: BREEDING TO FURTHER RAISE WHEAT YIELDS
Genetic Gains in Wheat Yield and Associated Physiological Changes During the Twentieth Century
351(28)
Daniel F. Calderini
Matthew P. Reynolds
Gustavo A. Slafer
Introduction
351(1)
Plant Breeding and Genetic Gains in Grain Yield
352(3)
Consequences of Breeding for Plant Height and Related Traits
355(2)
Plant Breeding and Biomass: Effects on Partitioning and Growth
357(8)
Genetic Improvements in Nitrogen and Phosphorus Economies
365(3)
Numerical Yield Components in Old and Modern Cultivars
368(4)
Conclusion
372(7)
Physiological Traits That Increase the Yield Potential of Wheat
379(38)
Gustavo A. Slafer
Jose L. Araus
Richard A. Richards
Introduction
379(2)
Identifying Promising Traits
381(14)
Selecting for Promising Traits
395(6)
Concluding Remarks
401(16)
Breeding hybrid Wheat for Low-Yielding Environments
417(24)
Jori P. Jordaan
Introduction
417(1)
Genotype-Stress Interaction
417(4)
The Hybrid Profile
421(1)
Genetic Diversity is Paramount
421(2)
Intrapopulation Improvement
423(5)
Selection Within the Male Pool
428(1)
Heterosis and Plant Population X Row Width Interactions
428(2)
Hybrid Yield, Stability, and Response to Yield
430(2)
The Ideal Hybrid
432(9)
Actual and Potential Contributions of Biotechnology to Wheat Breeding
441(20)
Robert M. D. Koebner
John W. Snape
Introduction
441(1)
Molecular Markers, Maps, and Their Application
442(8)
Introgression of ``Alien'' Genes into Wheat by Chromosome Engineering
450(4)
Genetic Engineering of Wheat
454(2)
Conclusion
456(5)
Author Index 461(24)
Subject Index 485

Rewards Program

Write a Review