9780521168243

Why Europe Grew Rich and Asia Did Not: Global Economic Divergence, 1600–1850

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521168243

  • ISBN10:

    0521168244

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2011-09-30
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
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Summary

Why Europe Grew Rich and Asia Did Not provides a striking new answer to the classic question of why Europe industrialised from the late eighteenth century and Asia did not. Drawing significantly from the case of India, Prasannan Parthasarathi shows that in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the advanced regions of Europe and Asia were more alike than different, both characterized by sophisticated and growing economies. Their subsequent divergence can be attributed to different competitive and ecological pressures that in turn produced varied state policies and economic outcomes. This account breaks with conventional views, which hold that divergence occurred because Europe possessed superior markets, rationality, science or institutions. It offers instead a groundbreaking rereading of global economic development that ranges from India, Japan and China to Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire and from the textile and coal industries to the roles of science, technology and the state.

Author Biography

Prasannan Parthasarathi is Associate Professor in the Department of History at Boston College. His previous publications include The Transition to a Colonial Economy: Weavers, Merchants and Kings in South India, 1720-1800 (Cambridge, 2001) and The Spinning World: A Global History of Cotton Textiles, 1200-1850 (co-edited with Giorgio Riello, 2009).

Table of Contents

List of figuresp. viii
List of mapsp. ix
List of tablesp. x
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
List of abbreviationsp. xiv
Mapsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Setting the stage: Europe and Asia before divergence
India and the global economy, 1600-1800p. 21
Political institutions and economic lifep. 51
The divergence of Britain
The European response to Indian cottonsp. 89
State and market: Britain, France and the Ottoman Empirep. 115
From cotton to coalp. 151
The Indian path
Science and technology in India, 1600-1800p. 185
Modern industry in early nineteenth-century Indiap. 223
Conclusionp. 263
Notes to the textp. 270
Bibliographyp. 324
Indexp. 353
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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