9780815335276

Why Nations Put to Sea

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780815335276

  • ISBN10:

    081533527X

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2000-02-24
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Summary

This book examines the impact that technological innovation has on the character and application of national power. Specifically, the book. addresses the impact of a changing rate of technological innovation on political and military capability. To this end "Sea Power" is used as a platform for a strategic examination of the impact that technological innovation plays on all existing political and military systems. Technological innovation is increasing exponentially; this condition results in a new set of political-military implications for nations. Research conclusions suggest that organizational responses to technological innovation are decisive in promoting and sustaining national power. These "organizations" may be military, governmental, industrial, or a combination of the three. Indeed, within a given nation, various organizations may be working at across-purposes with regard to the incorporation of advanced technology into the nation's armed forces. Relative economic and military strength hasnever been a more fragile and waning national attribute. Since history offers examples both of ready acceptance of new technology and of organizational complacency in the face of change, the ability of national leadership to foster receptive attitudes toward technology within important government organizations will be of singular importance in the coming technological struggle.

Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xv
Introduction 1(1)
Topic and Research Problem
1(3)
The Nature of Maritime Power
4(1)
The Character of Maritime Power
5(1)
Research Assumptions and Method
6(5)
The Historic Importance of Sea Power
11(24)
The History of Sea Power
11(2)
Great Sea Powers in History
13(1)
Defining Sea Power
14(2)
Sources of Sea Power
16(1)
Principles of Military Power
17(4)
Navies in the Nuclear Era
21(3)
Mercantile Power
24(1)
Summary of the History of Sea Power
25(10)
The Impact of Technological Innovation
35(50)
Science, Technology, and Human Progress
35(2)
The Meaning of Science and Technology
37(1)
Pace of Innovation
38(2)
Science, Technology, and Military Power
40(6)
The Myth of the Battleship Admirals
46(4)
Declining Force Structures
50(2)
The Risks of Complacency
52(4)
Drawing Board to Field
56(5)
Rich and Poor Nations
61(1)
Second Tier vs. First Tier---Instability of State Power Rankings
61(3)
Natural Resource Availability and the Role of Sea Power
64(3)
The Strategic Importance of Natural Resources
67(1)
Technology Leading Exploration
67(1)
Technology Changing the Nature of Maritime Power
68(1)
Conclusion
69(16)
National Merchant Marines and Economic Reliance on Sea Power
85(20)
Maritime Power and Transportation
85(2)
Planes and Boats
87(2)
United States' Exports, by Method of Transport: 1980 to 1994
88(1)
Merchant Fleets and Force Projection
89(4)
Ammunition Expenditures per Type Unit per Day in Standard Tons
92(1)
The Decline of the American Merchant Marine
93(1)
Dangers of Dependence on Foreign Shipping
94(5)
Merchant Vessels, World and United States: 1960 to 1993
96(1)
Merchant Fleets of the World per Registry: 1993
97(1)
World Merchant Fleets per Vessel Owner: As of January 1, 1997
98(1)
Imitation as Flattery
99(6)
Sea Power in the 21st Century
105(6)
Sea Power in the 21st Century
105(3)
Technology's Two-Way Street
108(1)
Proving the Future
109(2)
Appendix A 111(4)
Appendix B 115(10)
Appendix C 125(2)
Works Cited 127(10)
Index 137

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