CART

(0) items

Working with Clay : Ceramic Technique,9780130983480
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Working with Clay : Ceramic Technique

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780130983480

ISBN10:
0130983489
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $80.80
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $7.63
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Working With Clay
    Working With Clay
  • Working with Clay : An Introduction
    Working with Clay : An Introduction




Summary

This new edition of Working with Clay is substantially revised and redesigned to be even more specifically crafted to meet the needs of the beginning student of ceramics. It combines clear instructions with easy-to-follow pictures and inspires with its examples of a wide range of colorful ceramics throughout. bull; bull;Full color illustrations throughout bull;Clear, easy-to-follow steps, now with many more pictorial sequences bull;Suggested projects for the beginner bull;An inspirational chapter on the art of ceramics, ranging from masks and animals through walls and installations bull;A brief pictorial history of ceramics bull;A glossary of terms and a bibliography for further reading 494 full color photographs, including 150 new images

Table of Contents

Preface to the First Edition 8(1)
Preface to the Second Edition 8(1)
The Safety Aspect 9(2)
The World of Ceramics
11(24)
Introduction
11(1)
Clay and Pottery
11(1)
The Aesthetic of Contemporary Claywork
12(4)
Functional vs Sculptural
16(1)
Types of Ceramics
17(5)
Earthenware
17(2)
Stoneware
19(2)
Porcelain
21(1)
What is Clay?
22(1)
What is a Clay Body?
23(2)
Paperclay
25(5)
Alternative clays and additions: paperclay for kilns
26(4)
Why Mix Your Own Clay Body?
30(1)
Methods of Mixing Clay Bodies
30(1)
Storing the Clay
31(1)
How important is fired shrinkage and absorption?
31(1)
How to reclaim scrap clay
31(1)
What is Glaze?
32(1)
Firing Ceramics
33(2)
The Craft of Working with Clay by Hand
35(32)
Getting Started
35(1)
Tools for Working
36(1)
Wedging Clay
36(1)
Building by Hand: Introduction
36(3)
Hand-building Techniques
39(17)
Pinching clay
39(1)
Coil method, smooth or textured
39(4)
Slab building
43(7)
Using an armature
50(1)
Drape in a hammock
51(1)
Over-the-hump slab building
51(2)
Ceramic sculpture
53(3)
Learning from Techniques Used by Indigenous Peoples
56(1)
Methods of forming
56(1)
Altering While Building
56(3)
Changing clay surface
56(2)
Coloring with mineral/vegetable matter
58(1)
Working with Plaster
59(2)
How to make a mold
60(1)
Make Your Own Casting Slip or Buy It Ready-made
61(3)
How to Mix Plaster and Pour a Form
64(3)
Throwing on the Potter's Wheel
67(32)
Anyone can Learn to Throw...
67(1)
To the Beginner
68(1)
Steps in Throwing on the Potter's Wheel
69(3)
Wedging
69(1)
Position at the wheel
70(1)
Centering
70(1)
Opening the ball
71(1)
Practice These Five Shapes
72(7)
Pull up and shape a cylinder
72(1)
Half-spherical shape
73(1)
Full spherical shape
74(4)
Sphere and cylinder combined
78(1)
Low open form
78(1)
Other Shapes are Variations
79(5)
Pitcher
79(1)
Handles
80(1)
Casserole
81(1)
Lids
81(2)
Teapot, coffee-pot
83(1)
Sets
84(1)
Closed form
84(1)
Do-nut
84(1)
Throwing off the hump
84(1)
Trimming
84(1)
Large Forms
85(14)
Finishing Touches
99(30)
Enhancing the Clay Form
99(1)
Decorating with Clay
99(8)
Texture
99(2)
Adding clay to clay
101(2)
Engobes
103(1)
Engobe techniques
103(4)
Testing and Using Glazes
107(1)
Glaze composition
107(1)
Calculating glaze formulas
107(1)
Why Make Your Own Glaze?
107(1)
Coloring Glazes
107(3)
Glaze stains and oxides
107(1)
Basic glaze batches for low, medium, high temperatures
108(1)
Reds, yellows, and oranges
109(1)
Mixing and Storing Glazes
110(1)
Glaze Application
110(2)
Methods
110(2)
Decorating with Glaze
112(4)
Sample Commercial Glazes
116(1)
Glass is a Ceramic Material
117(4)
Keep records
119(2)
Experimentation
121(1)
Line blends
121(1)
Glaze Improvizations
121(8)
Firing Ceramics
129(24)
Heat Principles
129(1)
Kilns
130(3)
Gas kilns
132(1)
Electric kilns
133(1)
Commercial Ready-made Kilns
133(2)
Why Build Your Own Kiln?
135(1)
Firing Principles
136(1)
Temperature Indicators
137(1)
Guide-posts for temperature
138(1)
Pyrometric Temperature Devices
138(1)
Oxidation and Reduction Atmospheres
138(3)
Copper reds
140(1)
Iron celadons and tenmokus
141(1)
Stacking and Firing Kilns
141(2)
Bisque firing
141(1)
Glaze firing
142(1)
Alternative Firings
143(8)
Pit firing
143(1)
Raku firing
143(3)
Salku firing
146(1)
Salt firing
146(1)
Soda firing
147(1)
Wood firing
147(4)
Glaze and Firing Problems
151(2)
The Art of Ceramics
153(27)
From Idea to Art
153(27)
Pots and plates
154(2)
Birds and animals
156(2)
Figures
158(5)
Walls
163(5)
Mixed media
168(2)
Sculpture
170(4)
Installations
174(6)
The Timeless World History of Ceramic Art
180(8)
Compendium
188(8)
Suggested Projects for Individual Work
188(1)
Decide on general procedure
188(1)
Suggested Projects for Beginning Hand-building
189(1)
Progression of Individual Steps in Throwing
190(1)
Suggested Projects for Clay, Glaze, and Decoration Experiments
191(1)
Body and glaze development
191(1)
Decoration
191(1)
Design standards to keep in mind
191(1)
Experimenting with Material Additions to a Base Glaze
191(1)
Glaze Improvizations
192(1)
Glaze ``Line-blend'' Test
192(1)
Special Low-fire Information
193(1)
Egyptian paste
193(1)
Colors for Egyptian paste
193(1)
Mosaic cement
193(1)
Low-fire engobe
193(1)
Example of a Pottery Studio
194(1)
Terms Easily Mixed Up
194(1)
Temperature Equivalents of Orton Cones
195(1)
Temperature Equivalents of Seger Cones
195(1)
Glossary 196(3)
List of Artists 199(4)
Information Sources 203(1)
Bibliography 204(1)
Photo Credits 205(1)
Index 206

Excerpts

PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION, 1998 I have written this book to inspire and to teach the beginner about working with clay through colorful photographs and anecdotal descriptions of the various processes involved. I also aim to appeal to the collector, who can make use of this analysis to gain an indepth perspective on historical and contemporary ceramics. The practical photographs are set off by copious illustrations of what can be achieved, from everyday items such as plates and bowls to international examples of the potter's art such as sculpture and site installations. Beginner students and all those who appreciate the art of ceramics will find many illuminating insights into this endlessly fascinating world. My long career as a professor of ceramic art and a practicing potter has enabled me to pass on the benefits of my experience to students and aficionados at all levels. I have five books in print, apart from this one:Shoji Hamada, A Potter's Way and Work; The Living Tradition of Maria Martinez, Lucy M. Lewis, American Indian Potter, The Craft and Art of Clay; Pottery by American Indian Women.I have a video in circulation from film made at Hamada's studio in 1970 when I did the notes for his book, and a series of 54 videos on ceramics, called "Wheels, Kilns, and Clay." Thanks are due to the many artists all over the world who have helped me with suggestions and by sending me their own examples. I am grateful to Laurence King, Lee Ripley Greenfield, Judy Rasmussen, Janet Pilch, and the staff at Calmann & King in London who package the book; to Elisabeth Ingles, my editor, and Karen Stafford, who designed the book; to Craig Smith, who photographed the process shots of me working in my studio, to Bud Therien at Prentice Hall, and to Overlook/Viking. I also acknowledge the help and encouragement of my three children, Jill Peterson Hoddick, Jan Sigrid Peterson, and Taag Paul Peterson, plus five grandchildren, Annah Gerletti, Kayley Hoddick, Alexander and Calder Peterson, and Augustus John Gerletti. I would not have got so much done without assistants Nori Pao, Judith Schreibman, and Tony Mulanix. Finally, a fond remembrance and deep gratitude to my deceased parents, Iva and Paul Harnly, and my late husband Robert Schwarz Jr. SUSAN HARNLY PETERSON Carefree, Arizona, June 1998 PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION, 2002 Since 1998 I have published five more books: the second edition of this one,Working with Clay; the third edition of The Craft and Art of Clay; Contemporary Ceramics; Smashing Glazes;andJun Kaneko-- quite an output! March 2002 sees the establishment of the Susan Harnly Peterson Ceramic Archive and Study Collection in the Ceramic Research Center of the Nelson Art Museum of Arizona State University. We hope many of you will add to this beginning. I am grateful to all you artists over the globe who send me your images, invite me to lecture in your schools and conferences, and aid in countless other ways. Helpers on this edition include my children and grandchildren, and my assistants Lucy Horner and Jarilyn Mason (daughter of John and Vernita). K.C. O'Connell, my studio assistant, made the new clay and glaze tests. My friend and remarkable photographer Craig Smith took the process and test photos. I am grateful to the same team as before at Laurence King Publishing, London. This edition has increased in length, to include modifications and new techniques. Much is changing in the ceramic world. I see fewer purely functional pots except in folk cultures -- we all want to decorate and invent forms! More use of prepared clay and commercial glazes is apparent, but there is a return to basics in building your own kilns, in old-fashioned firings such as wood, oil, raku, pit, salt, and to prospecting your own materials. We are grasping for ever larger scale, for mixed media combinations, for room-or building-size


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...