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The World of Culinary Supervision, Training and Management,9780131140707
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The World of Culinary Supervision, Training and Management

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131140707

ISBN10:
0131140701
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

For sophomore/senior-level undergraduate courses in Food and Beverage; courses in all culinary arts two- and four-year degree programs; training seminars for chefs; and certification programs for the American Culinary Federation Educational Institute. This unique text gives aspiring chefs, sous chefs, chefs de cuisine, and executive chefs the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to lead, supervise and manage foodservice workers. In-depth, yet easily understood, it outlines in clear terms those elements crucial to success in today's quality driven foodservice industrydetailing the elements of supervision and total quality management. It examines all aspects of training as it affects the chef supervisor; and providing practical, step-by-step discussions on crucial management skills and functions involving a chef supervisor. This informational and educational training resource fulfills a need as chefs move from being culinarians to managers, supervisors, and trainers in the world of total quality management. It identifies those key areas that will lead qualified individuals into the chef positions of the future, and provides reasonable solutions to situations that typically evolve from them.

Author Biography

Jerald W. Chesser is Associate Dean and Professor at the Collins School of Hospitality Management, California State Polytechnic University - Pomona.

Table of Contents

``Chef Talk'' Contributors xi
Preface xv
Part One The Chef AS Supervisor
Supervision
1(26)
Outline
1(1)
Objectives
2(1)
Case Study
2(1)
Introduction
3(1)
Definition of Supervision
4(1)
Attributes of the Successful Chef Supervisor
5(1)
Chef Supervisory Role Models
6(3)
Duties and Functions of the Chef Supervisor
9(1)
The Chef Supervisor and Total Quality Management
10(2)
Elements of Kitchen Supervision
12(8)
The Concept of Authority
20(1)
The Evolution of Supervisory Chefs
20(3)
Conclusions
23(1)
Summary
23(1)
Discussion Questions
24(1)
Notes
24(3)
Quality, Philosophy, History, Excellence, Reengineering, and Change
27(24)
Outline
27(1)
Objectives
28(1)
Case Study
28(1)
Total Quality Management
29(3)
The Foodservice Customer Defined
32(1)
Deming's Principles of Quality
33(6)
Philosophies, Concepts, and Strategies of Management
39(1)
Scientific Management: A Historical Perspective
40(1)
Management by Objectives
40(2)
The Excellence Movement
42(1)
Reengineering
43(2)
Change
45(3)
Conclusions
48(1)
Summary
49(1)
Discussion Questions
49(1)
Notes
49(2)
Motivation, Morale, and Strokes
51(20)
Outline
51(1)
Objectives
52(1)
Case Study
52(1)
Introduction
53(1)
Defining Motivation
53(2)
Theories and Motivational Philosophies
55(4)
Morale
59(3)
Strokes
62(4)
Feedback
66(1)
Conclusions
67(1)
Summary
68(1)
Discussion Questions
68(1)
Notes
69(2)
Building Teamwork in the Kitchen
71(26)
Outline
71(1)
Objectives
72(1)
Case Study
73(1)
What Is Teamwork
74(1)
Building a Successful Kitchen Team
75(1)
Groups and Teams
76(1)
Developing a Kitchen Team Commitment
77(2)
Getting It Done: Developing the Kitchen Team Project or Plan
79(2)
Empowerment and Kitchen Teams
81(4)
Empowerment and Job Enrichment
85(1)
Involving the Kitchen Team
85(5)
Improving Kitchen Teamwork
90(1)
Interteam Dependence
91(1)
Creating a Vision and Building a Superior Kitchen Team
92(1)
A Great Place to Work
93(1)
Breaking Down Barriers
93(2)
Discussion Questions
95(1)
Notes
95(2)
Total Quality Respect
97(16)
Outline
97(1)
Objectives
97(1)
Case Study
98(1)
Introduction
99(4)
Diversity
103(2)
Harassment
105(4)
Conclusions
109(1)
Summary
109(1)
Discussion Questions
110(1)
Notes
110(3)
Dealing with Conflict and Complaints
113(18)
Outline
113(1)
Objectives
114(1)
Case Study
114(2)
Introduction
116(1)
Frustration
116(1)
Complaints
117(2)
Job Satisfaction
119(1)
Health and Safety in the Kitchen
120(3)
Counseling
123(3)
Stress
126(1)
Conclusions
127(1)
Summary
127(1)
Discussion Questions
128(1)
Notes
128(3)
The Chef as Communicator
131(28)
Outline
131(1)
Objectives
132(1)
Case Study
132(1)
Introduction
133(2)
Elements of Communication
135(2)
Barriers to Communication
137(4)
Nonverbal Communication
141(1)
Listening
142(2)
Ways to Improve Listening Skills
144(2)
Giving Directions
146(1)
Leading a TQM Meeting
147(1)
Written Communication
148(6)
Communication via the Grapevine
154(1)
Conclusions
155(1)
Summary
155(1)
Discussion Questions
156(1)
Notes
156(3)
The Chef as Leader
159(26)
Outline
159(1)
Objectives
160(1)
Case Study
160(1)
Introduction
161(2)
Leadership Development
163(5)
Trait Theories
168(1)
Behavioral Theories
168(2)
Leadership Styles
170(1)
The Nature of Culinary Leadership
171(3)
Building Leadership Self-Confidence
174(1)
Developing Culinary Leadership
175(3)
Humor as a Leadership Tool
178(2)
Conclusions
180(2)
Summary
182(1)
Discussion Questions
182(1)
Notes
183(2)
Part Two The Chef as Trainer
Total Quality and Training in the Kitchen
185(24)
Outline
185(1)
Objectives
186(1)
Case Study
186(2)
Introduction
188(1)
Total Quality Management and Training
188(1)
A Systems Approach to Training
189(5)
Types of Training
194(3)
How People Learn
197(3)
Adult Learning
200(1)
Barriers to Learning
201(3)
Conclusions
204(1)
Summary
205(1)
Discussion Questions
206(1)
Notes
207(2)
Preparing Training Objectives
209(12)
Outline
209(1)
Objectives
210(1)
Case Study
210(1)
Introduction
211(1)
Definitions
211(2)
Hierarchy of Objectives
213(2)
Training Lesson Plans
215(1)
Characteristics of a Training Session
216(1)
Steps in Planning a Training Session
217(2)
Summary
219(1)
Discussion Questions
220(1)
Notes
220(1)
Understanding Instructional Delivery
221(18)
Outline
221(1)
Objectives
222(1)
Case Study
222(1)
Introduction
223(1)
Getting Started
224(1)
Dealing with Nervousness
225(1)
Effective Interpersonal Communication
226(1)
Training and Diversity
227(2)
Trainer Styles and Attributes
229(2)
Getting the Team Involved
231(4)
Understanding Group Behaviors
235(1)
Summary
236(1)
Discussion Questions
237(1)
Notes
238(1)
Training Methods
239(22)
Outline
239(1)
Objectives
240(1)
Case Study
240(2)
Introduction
242(1)
Specific Training Methods
242(12)
Training Reinforcement
254(2)
Negative Training Methods
256(1)
Developing the Team Member with Potential
256(1)
Training Evaluation
257(2)
Summary
259(1)
Discussion Questions
260(1)
Notes
260(1)
Induction and Orientation Training
261(14)
Outline
261(1)
Objectives
262(1)
Case Study
262(2)
Introduction
264(1)
Induction Training
264(1)
Orientation Training
265(3)
Duration of Orientation Training
268(1)
Communicating Induction and Orientation Training
269(1)
Topics for Kitchen Orientation
270(2)
Follow-Up and Evaluation
272(1)
Summary
272(2)
Discussion Questions
274(1)
Notes
274(1)
Training Media and Technology
275(14)
Outline
275(1)
Objectives
276(1)
Case Study
276(1)
Introduction
277(2)
Computer-Generated Slides and Digital Projection
279(1)
Overhead Projection
280(1)
DVD, Videotape, and Film
281(1)
Interactive Computer Training
282(1)
Multimedia Technology
283(1)
35-mm Slide Presentations
284(1)
Job Aids
285(1)
Summary
286(1)
Discussion Questions
286(1)
Notes
287(2)
Training and Transactional Analysis
289(12)
Outline
289(1)
Objectives
290(1)
Case Study
290(1)
Introduction
291(1)
Identifying Ego States
292(3)
Crossed Transactions
295(1)
Psychological Games
296(3)
Summary
299(1)
Discussion Questions
299(1)
Notes
300(1)
Part Three Management and Chef Supervisors
Managing and Utilizing Time
301(12)
Outline
301(1)
Objectives
302(1)
Case Study
302(1)
Introduction
303(2)
Time Management Misconceptions
305(1)
Choosing Priorities
306(1)
Time Leaks
307(1)
Time Management Skills
308(3)
Summary
311(1)
Discussion Questions
312(1)
Notes
312(1)
Recruiting and Selecting Kitchen Team Members
313(20)
Outline
313(1)
Objectives
314(1)
Case Study
314(1)
Introduction
315(1)
Job Descriptions
316(1)
Recruitment
317(1)
Legal Implications
318(2)
Screening
320(1)
Interviewing
321(8)
Making the Decision
329(1)
Summary
330(1)
Discussion Questions
331(1)
Notes
331(2)
Discipline and the Kitchen Team
333(14)
Outline
333(1)
Objectives
334(1)
Case Study
334(1)
Introduction
335(1)
Chef Supervisor's Role
336(1)
Approaches to Discipline
336(4)
Administering Discipline
340(3)
Approaches to Positive Discipline
343(1)
Exit Interviews
344(1)
Summary
345(1)
Discussion Questions
345(1)
Notes
346(1)
Problem Solving and Decision Making
347(16)
Outline
347(1)
Objectives
348(1)
Case Study
348(1)
Introduction
349(1)
The Decision-Making Process
350(1)
Empowerment and Decision Making
351(2)
Problems
353(1)
The Pareto Principle
354(3)
Rules of Problem Solving and Decision Making
357(2)
Summary
359(1)
Discussion Questions
360(1)
Notes
361(2)
Team Performance Appraisal
363(12)
Outline
363(1)
Objectives
364(1)
Case Study
364(1)
Introduction
365(1)
Evaluating Performance
365(2)
Methods of Evaluation
367(1)
Appraisal Interviews
368(3)
Compensation
371(1)
Summary
372(1)
Discussion Questions
372(1)
Notes
373(2)
Appendix A Federal Regulations and Executive Orders 375(8)
Appendix B Glossary of Terms 383(7)
Appendix C Bibliography 390(6)
Index 396

Excerpts

Dr. Noel Cullen's first edition of this book achieved his original aim "to create an information, educational, and training resource for all culinarians." As Chef Ferdinand Metz said in the foreword to the second edition, "This book fills a void in the industry and brings the matter of supervision in the kitchen to the fore." The need for chef supervisors in the kitchen to direct, mentor, and lead staff with the same high level of expertise and professionalism that they practice in the art and science of culinary preparation has not diminished--it has grown. Twenty-first-century culinarians must prepare themselves with culinary knowledge and knowledge of supervision, training, and management. Dr. Cullen recognized this need and provided a valuable resource that would assist future culinarians in this endeavor. The importance in the kitchen of teamwork, mentoring, leadership, supervision, training, management, and a total quality focus continues unabated. Total quality in foodservice has always been and always will be achieved through teamwork driven by leadership, management, supervision, and training. This third edition continues Dr. Cullen's foresight in using the principles of total quality management as the foundation for culinary supervision, training, and management. It has been enhanced with updated information, expanded discussions of topics including leadership, diversity, and training technology, and case studies to assist the reader in understanding and applying the information. My appreciation goes out to Keith E. Gardiner of Guilford Technical Community College and John Britto of San Joaquin Delta College for their review of the manuscript. Supplemental materials have been expanded to include an instructor's manual, PowerPoint slides, and a test bank. Jerald W. Chesser, EdD, CEC, FMP, CEC


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