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World Politics : The Menu for Choice,9780534604127
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World Politics : The Menu for Choice

by
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780534604127

ISBN10:
0534604129
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
6/23/2005
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $152.00

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This is the 8th edition with a publication date of 6/23/2005.
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Summary

WORLD POLITICS: THE MENU FOR CHOICE, consistently praised as one of the best available combinations of theory and issues, provides studentswith the tools they need to understand the vast and complex subject of international relations. It incorporates current scholarship andinsightful analysis and provides an accessible introduction to game theory as a model for analyzing international relations. The text, tables,and figures have been thoroughly updated and new material has been added which relates conceptual and analytic tools to contemporarydevelopments in world affairs. Users have consistently praised this text as one of the best available combinations of theory and issues coverage.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Plan of the Book
vi
World Politics and the Web
vii
About the Authors xix
PART I ANALYZING WORLD POLITICS 1(192)
1 World Politics: Levels of Analysis, Choice, and Constraint
3(24)
Four Momentous Events
3(10)
Dropping the Atomic Bomb
3(2)
Ending the Cold War
5(2)
Asian Financial Crisis
7(3)
9/11
10(3)
Levels of Analysis
13(8)
International System and Nation-State
14(1)
Six Levels of Analysis
15(4)
Actors in World Politics
19(2)
The "Menu": Choice And Constraint in World Politics
21(4)
Opportunity and Willingness
21(3)
The Menu
24(1)
Plan of the Book
25(2)
2 Thinking about World Politics: Theory and Reality
27(22)
Realists, Liberals, and Radicals
27(5)
Recent Challenges
31(1)
Social Scientific Study of World Politics
32(3)
Comparison and Generalization
33(2)
Theory and Evidence
35(7)
Hypotheses and Assumptions
36(3)
Specifying and Testing Hypotheses
39(3)
The Study and Practice of World Politics
42(7)
The Question of Policy Relevance
43(2)
The Question of Values
45(4)
3 International Actors: States and Other Players on the World Stage
49(24)
Humans in Groups: Nationalism and the Nation
49(4)
Imagined Community
51(2)
The State as International Actor
53(9)
Modern State System
53(2)
Sovereignty and the Nature of the State
55(4)
Evolving Anarchy: The State System Since Westphalia
59(3)
All States Are Equal (but Some States Are More Equal Than Others)
62(3)
Nonstate Actors In the Contemporary System
65(8)
Intergovernmental Organizations
65(4)
Nongovernmental Organizations
69(1)
Multinational Corporations
70(1)
Nation-State versus Nonstate Loyalty
71(2)
4 The World System: International Structure and Polarity
73(29)
The International Environment
73(3)
Geopolitical Setting
74(1)
Technological Setting
75(1)
The Global System
76(4)
Emergence of the Contemporary System
78(2)
Status and Hierarchy in the International System
80(6)
Spheres of Influence
81(2)
Alliances
83(2)
Nonalignment
85(1)
Polarity in the International System
86(10)
Polarization and the Cold War
89(2)
Limits to Bipolarity
91(2)
Polarity and International Stability
93(3)
Balances and Imbalances of Power
96(6)
American Hegemony and World Order
98(4)
5 Relations Between States: Power and Influence
102(31)
Two Aspects of Power
102(6)
Power and Influence
103(2)
Soft Power
105(2)
Power and Capability
107(1)
National Capabilities: Tangible Elements
108(8)
Geography and Demography
108(2)
Economic and Military Resources
110(2)
Comparing Capabilities: Indexes of Power
112(4)
National Capabilities: Intangible Elements
116(4)
Intelligence
118(2)
Diplomatic Influence
120(7)
Negotiation and Bargaining
122(2)
Conflict Resolution
124(3)
Military and Economic Influence
127(6)
Use of Force
128(1)
Economic Persuasion
129(4)
6 Domestic Sources of Foreign Policy: Society and Polity
133(30)
Foreign Policy
133(4)
Goals and Objectives of Foreign Policy
135(1)
National Interests and Priorities
136(1)
Societal Influences on Foreign Policy
137(7)
Political and Strategic Culture
140(3)
Power Elite or Pluralism?
143(1)
Elite Opinion and Foreign Policy
144(4)
Content of Elite Opinion
145(3)
The Impact of Mass Public Opinion
148(12)
The Gender Gap
150(2)
Public Approval of State Leaders
152(6)
Do Wars Win Elections?
158(2)
Who Governs? Public Opinion Matters
160(3)
7 Individuals and World Politics: Roles, Perceptions, and Decision Making
163(32)
Rational Decision Making
163(6)
Risk Taking
166(3)
Governmental Decision Making
169(9)
Information: Searching, Screening, Processing
173(1)
Organizations and Bureaucracies
174(3)
Principals and Agents
177(1)
Small Group Interaction
178(3)
Individual Perceptions and Beliefs
181(6)
Misperception and the Image of the Enemy
182(4)
Ideologies and Belief Systems
186(1)
Personality and Physiology
187
Stress and Strain of Foreign Policy Making
189
Conclusion to Part I
19(174)
PART II INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT AND COOPERATION 193(148)
8 Military Conflict: Why States and Other Actors Resort to Force
195(35)
Violent Change in World Politics
195(5)
Human Aggression
197(2)
Aggression and Deprivation
199(1)
Conflict between States
200(12)
Economic Structure and War
203(6)
The Distribution of Power and War
209(3)
Conflict within States
212(10)
Ethnic Conflict
216(4)
Greed and Predation
220(2)
Unconventional Conflict
222(8)
International Terrorism
223(4)
Information Warfare
227(3)
9 The Security Dilemma: Armament and Disarmament
230(38)
Armed Forces
230(7)
Arms Acquisition
231(4)
Global Military Presence
235(2)
Weapons of Mass Destruction
237(8)
A Brief History of the Nuclear Competition
238(5)
Proliferation
243(2)
The Security Dilemma
245(9)
The Prisoner's Dilemma
246(3)
Overcoming the Dilemma
249(2)
Repeated Encounters
251(3)
Deterrence
254(6)
Crisis Instability
256(1)
Brinkmanship
257(3)
Arms Control and Disarmament
260(8)
Nuclear Arms Control
261(5)
Controlling Conventional Weapons and Technology
266(2)
10 International Law and Organization
268(40)
Ethics, Law, and War
268(10)
Realism and Pacifism
269(2)
Just Wars
271(3)
Was the Iraq War a Just War?
274(4)
International Law
278(7)
Naturalism, Positivism, and Realism
279(1)
Sources, Functions, and Subjects of International Law
280(3)
Enforcing International Law
283(2)
Human Rights and Human Wrongs
285(9)
International Human Rights
287(3)
Humanitarian Intervention
290(2)
International Criminals
292(2)
International Organization
294(3)
Roles for International Organizations
296(1)
The United Nations System
297(11)
Structure and Politics
298(5)
Collective Security and Peacekeeping
303(3)
The "Three United Nations"
306(2)
11 Causes of Peace and Nonviolent Transformation
308(33)
The Zone of Peace
308(4)
Peace: Salaam or Sulah?
310(2)
The Democratic Peace
312(3)
Democratic Governance: Structure and Culture
313(2)
Perpetual Peace
315(10)
Economic Interdependence and Growth
320(4)
International Organizations
324(1)
Integration and Peace
325(6)
Transnational Cooperation
326(3)
Transnational Communication
329(1)
Security Communities
330(1)
Zones Of Turmoil
331(8)
Dangerous Democratic Transitions
332(3)
Democracy and Peace...by Force?
335(4)
Conclusion to Part II
339(2)
PART III INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY 341(136)
12 Political Economy of National Security and Defense
343(34)
Approaches to Political Economy
343(3)
Realism, Liberalism, and Radicalism
344(2)
Economics and Statecraft
346(9)
Economic Coercion
347(5)
National Competition and Geo-economics
352(3)
Political Economy of Defense
355(14)
The Military-Industrial Complex
356(3)
Defense-Industrial Policy
359(2)
Guns versus Butter
361(4)
Military Downsizing and Outsourcing
365(4)
The International Arms Market
369(8)
Global Arms Transfers
371(4)
Proliferation of Military Technology
375(2)
13 Interdependence and Economic Order
377(33)
Interdependence
377(3)
Sensitivity and Vulnerability
378(1)
Conflict and Harmony
379(1)
International Trade
380(4)
Comparative Advantage and Free Trade
381(2)
Protectionism
383(1)
Collective Goods
384(9)
Free Riders
388(2)
Strategies for Achieving Collective Goods
390(3)
Regimes and International Order
393(11)
Hegemony and Regimes
394(2)
The Monetary Regime
396(5)
The Trade Regime
401(3)
Economic Disorder and Realignment
404(6)
Hegemonic Decline
404(3)
Enduring Order
407(3)
14 Regional Economic Integration and Globalization
410(34)
European Union
410(13)
From Rome To Maastricht
411(4)
Institutions of the European Union
415(4)
Monetary Union
419(2)
Toward Political Union?
421(2)
Emerging Economic Blocs
423(9)
North American Free Trade Area
426(1)
Other Trading Blocs
427(3)
Regionalism and Multilateralism
430(2)
Globalization
432(12)
A New Interdependence?
433(3)
Transnational Relations
436(3)
Globalization's Downside
439(5)
15 Development and Underdevelopment: The North-South Gap
444(33)
The Development Gap
444(6)
Several Developing Worlds
445(4)
Demographics, Disease, and Geography
449(1)
Dependent Development
450(8)
Contemporary Dependence
452(2)
The Debt Problem
454(2)
Beyond Dependence: Self-Reliance and Basic Needs
456(2)
A New International Economic Order?
458(8)
International Market Reforms
458(1)
Industrialization
459(2)
Debt Relief and Development Assistance
461(3)
Dealing with Financial Crises
464(2)
Development and Political Freedom
466(9)
Dependency and State Repression
466(2)
Development and Democracy: Conventional Wisdom
468(2)
Democracy and Development: A New Wisdom?
470(5)
Conclusion to Part III
475(2)
PART IV CHALLENGES FOR THE NEW MILLENNIUM 477(44)
16 Limits of Sovereignty: Humanity and the Commons
479(33)
Collective Goods and Collective "Bads"
479(11)
Externalities and "Forced Riders"
480(1)
Tragedy of the Commons
481(6)
Sustainable Development
487(3)
Population and Demographics
490(5)
Human Population Explosion
490(3)
Demographic Transition
493(2)
Resource Depletion
495(6)
Food Insecurity
495(2)
Natural Resources
497(4)
Environmental Decay
501(5)
Pollution
501(3)
Deforestation and the Threat to Biodiversity
504(1)
Dilemmas of Development
505(1)
Obligations and Rights
506(6)
International Distributive Justice
507(3)
State Boundaries and Moral Boundaries
510(2)
17 Which Global Future?
512(9)
Three Futures
512(6)
The West Has Won
513(1)
Coming Culture Clash
514(3)
Globalization and Fragmentation
517(1)
A Final Word
518(3)
Glossary 521(9)
Appendix A: Chronology of World Events 530(5)
Appendix B: Characteristics of States in the Contemporary International System 535(8)
Name Index 543(8)
Subject Index 551


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