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Writing History : A Guide for Students,9780195166095

Writing History : A Guide for Students

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780195166095

ISBN10:
0195166094
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/17/2003
Publisher(s):
OXFORD UNIV PR
List Price: $16.95

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 7/17/2003.
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  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

Bringing together practical methods from both history and composition, Writing History provides a wealth of tips and advice to help students research and write essays for history classes. The book covers all aspects of writing about history, including finding topics and researching them,interpreting source materials, drawing inferences from sources, and constructing arguments. It concludes with three chapters that discuss writing effective sentences, using precise wording, and revising. Using numerous examples from the works of cultural, political, and social historians, WritingHistory serves as an ideal supplement to history courses that require students to conduct research. The second edition includes expanded sections on plagiarism, interviewing, and topic selection, as well as new sections on searching and using the Internet.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Introduction 1(2)
Getting Started
3(14)
Explore Your Interests
3(1)
Move from a Historical Interest to a Research Topic
4(1)
Use Print Sources to Begin a Project
5(1)
The A.H.A Guide
6(1)
Speak with a Librarian
7(1)
Use Electronic Resources in the Library
8(1)
Be Skeptical About Other Online Resources
9(2)
Approach Your Topic from a Particular Angle
11(1)
Go to the Library and Do Some Background Reading
12(1)
Browse for More Sources
13(1)
Form a Hypothesis
13(1)
Craft a Proposal
14(1)
Write an Annotated Bibliography
15(1)
Talk to People About Your Topic
16(1)
If You Have to Abandon a Topic, Do It Early
16(1)
Interpreting Source Materials
17(8)
Work Systematically
17(1)
Distinguish Primary Sources from Secondary Works
18(1)
Refine Your Hypothesis with Who, What, Why, Where, and When
19(2)
Be Sensitive to Points of View in Your Sources
21(1)
Select the Most Important Source Materials
22(1)
Take Notes by Being Selective
23(2)
Writing History Faithfully
25(20)
Collect and Report Your Sources Carefully
25(1)
Incorporate the Ideas of Others with Care and Respect
26(1)
Summarize and Paraphrase Fairly
27(1)
Quote Occasionally
28(2)
Use Ellipses and Brackets, but Do Justice to Your Sources
30(2)
Learn How to Use Quotation Marks
32(1)
Don't Plagiarize
33(3)
Be Honest, but Don't Give Unnecessary Citations
36(1)
Choose a Citation System That Suits Your Audience
36(9)
Use Sources to Make Inferences
45(16)
Be True to Recognized Facts
46(1)
Transform Facts into Evidence
46(1)
Check Your Facts
47(1)
Check the Internal Consistency of Primary Sources
47(1)
Check Primary Sources Against Each Other
48(1)
Compare Primary Sources with Secondary Works
48(3)
Box 1: Conduct Interviews Systematically
49(2)
Juxtapose Sources to Make Inferences
51(4)
Box 2: Make Inferences from Material Sources
54(1)
Move from Inferences to Arguments
55(1)
Make Reasonable Inferences from Your Sources
55(1)
Make Inferences That Are Warranted
56(2)
Avoid Unwarranted Comparisons
58(1)
Avoid Anachronistic Inferences
58(3)
Get Writing!
61(6)
Consider Narratives and Analysis
61(1)
Create a Draft Outline of an Analytical Essay
62(1)
Create a Draft Outline of a Narrative Essay
62(1)
Complete Your Analytical Outline
63(1)
Complete Your Narrative Outline
64(1)
Choose a Framework for Your Essay
65(2)
Build an Argument
67(14)
Start to Write a First Draft
67(1)
Grab Your Reader's Attention, but Do It Gently
68(1)
State Your Intellectual Interests Early
69(1)
Build Your Essay with Good Paragraphs
70(2)
Define Your Key Terms Early
72(1)
Set an Appropriate Tone
73(2)
Treat Other Writers with Consideration
75(1)
Account for Counterarguments
76(2)
Lead Your Readers to an Interesting Conclusion
78(3)
Narrative Techniques for Historians
81(6)
Write a Narrative to Tell a Story
81(1)
Write a Narrative to Support an Argument
82(1)
Combine Chronology with Causation
82(1)
Get a Sense of Change and Continuity
83(1)
Select the Key Participants in Your Story
84(1)
Find Your Own Voice as a Narrator
84(1)
Choose Your Own Beginning and End
85(2)
Writing Sentences in History
87(8)
Choose Verbs That Are Precise
87(1)
Make Passive Sentences Active
88(1)
Write in the Past Tense
88(1)
Avoid Split Infinitives If You Can
89(1)
Put Verbs in Your Sentences
89(1)
Put Your Ideas in an Intelligible Order
90(1)
Keep Related Words Together
90(1)
Keep Pronouns Close to the Words They Represent
90(1)
Keep Subjects and Verbs Close Together
91(1)
Begin a Sentence on Common Ground and Gradually Build a New Point
91(1)
The Emphasis Comes at the End
92(1)
Construct Parallel Forms for Emphasis
92(1)
Form the Possessive Correctly
93(1)
Break the Rules If You Must
94(1)
Choose Precise Words
95(12)
Be Concise
95(1)
Write in Language That Your Audience Can Understand
96(2)
Avoid Pretentious Language
98(1)
Avoid Colloquial Language
98(1)
Be Sensitive to the Politics of Diction
98(1)
Be Sensitive to Gender-Specific Language
99(1)
Avoid Euphemisms
99(1)
Choose Figurative Language Carefully
100(1)
Use Metaphors and Similes Judiciously
100(1)
Use Color, but Avoid Cliches
101(1)
Use Foreign Words That Are Familiar to Your Audience
101(1)
Check for These Common Diction Problems
102(5)
Revising and Editing
107(6)
Get Some Perspective on Your Draft
107(1)
Revise Your Draft
108(1)
Evaluate Your Own Arguments and Narratives
108(1)
Evaluate Your Sentences and Word Choices
109(1)
Proofread the Final Draft
109(1)
Proofread for Punctuation
110(1)
Proofread for Spelling
110(1)
Check Your Formatting
110(1)
Read Your Paper Aloud
111(1)
Keep the Rules in Mind, but Enjoy Your Writing
111(2)
Notes 113(4)
Index 117


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