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Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum,9780321023971

Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum

by ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780321023971

ISBN10:
0321023978
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $57.00
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Summary

The original, best selling interdisciplinary composition text, Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum, 7/e, teaches students of all majors and interests to communicate more effectively. Hallmarks of the text include its sound writing instruction combined with engaging, thematic readings that provide depth of coverage in each discipline-specific chapter. Updated, streamlined pedagogy and class-tested new thematic chapters add excitement and currency to this new edition.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
Ancillaries xxvi
A Note to the Student xxviii
Part I How to Write Summaries, Critiques, and Synthesis 1(228)
Summary, Paraphrase, and Quotation
2(43)
What Is a Summary?
2(1)
Can a Summary Be Objective
2(1)
Using the Summary
3(1)
How to Write Summaries
4(1)
Demonstration: Summary
5(14)
For the Infertile, a High-Tech Treadmill
5(4)
Sheryl Gay Stolberg
Reread, Underline, Divide into Stages of Thought
9(3)
Write a One-Sentence Summary of Each Stage of Thought
12(1)
Write a Thesis: A One- or Two-Sentence Summary of the Entire Passage
13(2)
Write the First Draft of the Summary
15(1)
Summary 1: Combine Thesis Sentence with One-Sentence Section Summaries
15(1)
Discussion
16(1)
Summary 2: Combine Thesis Sentence, Section Summaries, and Carefully Chosen Details
16(3)
Discussion
19(1)
Summarizing a Narrative
19(5)
Crossing the Moon: A Journey Through Infertility
20(4)
Paulette Bates Alden
Summarizing Figures and Tables
24(4)
Paraphrase
28(5)
Quotations
33(9)
Choosing Quotations
33(4)
Incorporating Quotations into Your Sentences
37(5)
Exercise
42(3)
Body Body Double
42(3)
Alexander M. Capron
Critical Reading and Critique
45(35)
Critical Reading
45(12)
Question Category 1: What Is the Author's Purpose in Writing? Does He or She Succeed in This Purpose?
45(1)
Informative Writing
46(1)
Persuasive Writing
47(1)
A Simple One-Step Plan to Solve the Education Crisis: A Message to President Clinton and the 105th Congress
47(7)
J. Morton Davis
Writing that Entertains
54(1)
Question Category 2: To What Extent Do You Agree with the Author?
54(3)
Critique
57(1)
How to Write Critiques
57(1)
Demonstration: Critique
58(6)
Discussion
63(1)
Exercise
64(16)
An Avenue to High Academic Standards
65(5)
Lynn Olson
School-to-Work Will Train, Not Educate
70(10)
Phyllis Schlafly
Introductions, Theses, and Conclusions
80(19)
Writing Introductions
80(5)
Quotation
81(1)
Historical Review
81(1)
Review of a Controversy
82(1)
From the General to the Specific
82(1)
From the Specific to the General: Anecdote, Illustration
83(1)
Question
83(1)
Statement of Thesis
84(1)
Writing a Thesis
85(6)
The Components of a Thesis
85(1)
Limiting the Scope of the Thesis
86(4)
Using the Thesis
90(1)
Writing Conclusions
91(8)
Statement of the Subject's Significance
92(1)
Call for Further Research
93(1)
Solution/Recommendation
93(1)
Anecdote
94(1)
Quotation
95(1)
Question
96(1)
Speculation
97(2)
Synthesis
99(76)
What Is a Synthesis?
99(1)
Purpose
100(1)
Using Your Success
100(1)
How to Write Syntheses
101(1)
The Explanatory Synthesis
101(26)
The Y2K Problem, or The Millennium Bug
103(1)
The Story of 00
103(1)
Joseph Nocera
Countdown to Chaos
104(1)
Simon Reeve
James Adams
John Davison
Ghost in the Machine
104(1)
Jeff Green
Beat the Clock
104(1)
Jan Newberry
Walking on Thin Ice
105(1)
Peter De Jager
Preventing Time from Marching Backward
105(1)
Nation's Business
You've Got to be Kidding!
106(1)
Peter De Jager
The Day the World Shuts Down
106(1)
Steven Levy
Katie Hafner
Larry Gonick
Dante Chinni
Beware the Millennium
106(1)
Economist
The Next Date Crisis and the One After That
106(1)
Robert L. Glass
Consider Your Purpose
106(1)
Formulate a Thesis
107(1)
Decide How You Will Use Your Source Material
108(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
108(2)
Write the Topic Sentences
110(1)
Write Your Synthesis
111(1)
Model Essay: The Year 2000 Computer Problem
111(5)
Amy Matsui
Writing Exercise: An Expanded Explanatory Synthesis Drawing Upon More Sources
116(1)
Year 2000: 1000 Days Away, Survey Results
116(2)
Howard A. Rubin
Heidi Albrecht Battaglia
Military Memo: Year 2000 Fixes---Top Priority
118(1)
Dennis J. Reimer
Togo D. West, Jr.
Year 2000 Upgrades: A Small Price to Pay
119(2)
Leon Kappelman
Confessions of a Former Programmer
121(1)
Gary H. Anthes
Breakthrough May Help Squish Y2K Bug
122(1)
Kevin Maney
How to Profit from the Coming Y2K Glitch
123(1)
Bruce McCall
A Grave Problem with Y2K
124(3)
Janet Wilson
The Argument Synthesis
127(30)
The Elements of Argument: Claim, Support, Assumption
128(1)
The Three Appeals of Argument: Logos, Ethos, Pathos
129(5)
Developing an Argument Synthesis
134(1)
The Wal-Mart Controversy
134(1)
Ban the Bargains
134(2)
Bob Ortega
Eight Ways to Stop the Store
136(2)
Albert Norman
Wal-Mart's War on Main Street
138(1)
Sarah Anderson
Who's Really the Villian?
139(4)
Jo-Ann Johnston
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
143(2)
Hoover's Handbook of American Business
Sprawl-Busting Victories
145(1)
Albert Norman
Shopping With the Enemy
146(1)
Economist
Consider Your Purpose
147(1)
Making a Claim: Formulate a Thesis
147(1)
Decide How You Will Use Your Source Material
148(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
149(1)
Argument Strategy
149(1)
Draft and Revise Your Synthesis
150(1)
Model Essay: A Vote for Wal-Mart
150(4)
Discussion
154(3)
Developing and Organizing the Support For Your Arguments
157(3)
Summarize, Paraphrase, and Quote Supporting Evidence
157(1)
Provide Various Types of Evidence and Motivational Appeals
157(1)
Use Climactic Order
158(1)
Use Logical or Conventional Order
158(1)
Present and Respond to Counterarguments
159(1)
Use Concession
159(1)
Avoid Common Fallacies in Developing and Using Support
159(1)
The Comparison-and-Contrast Synthesis
160(15)
A Case for Comparison-Contrast: Murder or Manslaughter?
161(1)
Rowland v. State
162(1)
People v. Ashland
163(3)
Instructions to the Jury
166(3)
Comparison-Contrast (Organized by Criteria)
169(1)
Model Essay: Murder or Manslaughter?
169(4)
Discussion
173(1)
Summary
174(1)
Research
175(54)
Going Beyond This Text
175(1)
Research Papers in the Academic Disciplines
175(3)
Finding a Subject
178(1)
The Research Question
179(1)
Preliminary Research
180(3)
Consulting Knowledgeable People
180(1)
Encyclopedias
181(1)
Overviews and Bibliographies in Recent Books
182(1)
Bibliographical Index
182(1)
Subject-Heading Guides
183(1)
Focused Research
183(10)
Books
183(1)
Electronic Databases
184(1)
The Benefits and Pitfalls of the World Wide Web
185(3)
Periodicals: General
188(1)
Periodicals: Specialized
189(2)
Biographical Indexes
191(1)
Dictionaries
192(1)
Other Sources/Government Publications
192(1)
Interviews and Surveys
193(1)
From Research to Working Thesis
193(2)
The Working Bibliography
195(2)
Evaluating Sources
197(1)
Note-Taking
197(2)
Arranging Your Notes: The Outline
199(4)
Writing the Draft
203(1)
Avoiding Plagiarism
204(1)
Citings Sources
205(2)
In-Text Citation
206(1)
Content Notes
206(1)
Reference Page
207(1)
MLA Style
207(1)
In-Text Citation
207(2)
In-Text Citation of Electronic Sources
209(1)
Examples of MLA Citations in ``Works Cited'' List
210(9)
Books
210(3)
Periodicals
213(1)
Other Sources
214(1)
Electronic Sources
215(4)
APA Style
219(1)
In-Text Citation
219(2)
In-Text Citation of Electronic Sources
221(1)
Examples of APA Citations in ``References'' List
221(8)
Books
221(3)
Periodicals
224(1)
Other Sources
225(1)
Electronic Sources
226(3)
Part II An Anthology of Readings 229(643)
Political Science
Left, Right, Center: The American Political Spectrum
230(101)
Political Quiz: Are You a Liberal or a Conservative?
232(4)
Victor Kamber
Bradley S. O'Leary
Not sure what to say when pollsters ask whether you're liberal or conservative? Take this quiz and respond with confidence.
The Debate Beneath the Debate: What American Politics Is Really About
236(6)
Jeff Smith
Regardless of the particular issue, most political arguments are based on differing assumptions people have about human nature and responsibility, definitions of ``justice,'' and the proper role of government in the social sphere.
Liberalism, Conservatism, Socialism, Libertarianism
242(18)
James MacGregor Burns
J. W. Peltason
Thomas E. Cronin
David B. Magleby
Four political scientists discuss the main political ideologies in the United States today. Our assumptions about what is best and worst for the nation depend on whether we believe ``in the positive uses of government to bring about justice and equality of opportunity'' or whether we believe more strongly in limited government, private property rights, and free enterprise.
Guides to Political Conflicts
260(8)
Donald Lazere
Is The Nation liberal or conservative? Is Cornel West more or less liberal than Ted Koppel? What's the difference between fascism and communism? You can't tell the players without a scorecard, so here are six of them to help in the analysis of political rhetoric.
A Progressive Compact
268(6)
Jeff Faux
The underlying principles of liberalism are redefined for a new generation in the nation's oldest journal of liberal thought, The Nation. According to Faux, ``The progressive story is a vision of community and moral support. Its moral is that you are not alone.''
A Social Conservative Credo
274(7)
Charles Krauthammer
The classic conservative position: liberal policies, in the form of excessive government intervention in society, have led to the welfare state, cultural decay, and pervasive social breakdown. The solution: less government intervention and greater attention to values.
The Origin of Conservatism
281(11)
John O. McGinnis
According to McGinnis, ``Evolutionary theories suggest that conservative policies are necessary to govern a fallen man.'' While most liberals recoil from what they consider the social Darwinism of conservatives, McGinnis insists that new research into evolutionary biology validates the application of Darwin's theories to the social sphere.
When Government Gets Mean: Confessions of a Recovering Statist
292(7)
Barbara Ehrenreich
A writer argues that while liberal goals are just as important now as they ever were, progressives can no longer rely upon the government to solve social problems. Instead, citizens must work together, through their communities and through their unions, to achieve economic justice and to fight government attacks on civil liberties.
The Only Kind of Air
299(3)
Florence King
A conservative commentator for the National Review doesn't mid if liberals call her mean-spirited. ``I refuse to try to soften myself,'' she asserts, ``because I understand the benefits of the conservative temperament.''
Is the Left Nuts? (Or Is It Me?)
302(4)
Michael Moore
The documentary filmmaker who made Roger and Me stands firm with organized labor (and most other progressive causes); but he has no use for liberals who won't have a beer at the end of the day with a bunch of working stiffs at the bowling alley.
Mystery Readings: A ``Final Exam'' Assignment
306(19)
In the final section of the chapter we present eight short pieces that range from liberal to conservative to libertarian to socialist. Try to relate the ideas expressed by any or all of these authors to what you have read earlier in the chapter, and then explain where they stand on the political spectrum, and why you think so.
Who Makes the Clothes We Wear?
307(2)
Jesse Jackson
America at Risk: Can We Survive Without Moral Values?
309(2)
William J. Bennett
Family Values Gain Ground
311(2)
The Wall Street Journal
The Family Values Party
313(2)
Meg Greenfield
Curb Your Dog!
315(3)
Virginia I. Postrel
Real Scandal: Betrayal of the Poor
318(2)
Robert Scheer
The Criminalization of Homelessness
320(2)
Celine-Marie Pascale
Wrong Way to Help the Homeless
322(3)
Dwight Hobbs
Synthesis Activities
325(2)
Research Activities
327(4)
Psychology
Obedience to Authority
331(65)
Group Minds
333(3)
Doris Lessing
The flattering picture we paint of ourselves as individual leaves most of us ``helpless against all kinds of pressures...to conform.''
Opinions and Social Pressure
336(7)
Solomon E. Asch
How powerful is group pressure upon the individual? A landmark experiment demonstrates that most people will deny the evidence of their own eyesight sooner than risk appearing out of step with the majority.
The Perils of Obedience
343(14)
Stanley Milgram
A psychologist devises an experiment to test the extent to which people will obey immoral orders. His startling conclusion: that ``ordinary people...without any particular hostility on their part, can become agents in a terrible destructive process.''
Review of Stanley Milgram's Experiments on Obedience
357(6)
Diana Baumrind
A psychologist faults Milgram's experimental design and argues that social scientists are ethically bound to protect subjects from indignities.
The Stanford Prison Experiment
363(14)
Philip K. Zimbardo
A psychologist at Stanford University designs an experiment in which college-age men take on the roles of guard and prisoner---with surprising results. ``Can it really be,'' write Zimbardo, ``that intelligent, educated volunteers could have lost sight of the reality that they were merely acting a part in an elaborate game that would eventually end?''
Disobedience as a Psychological and Moral Problem
377(5)
Erich Fromm
``If mankind commits suicide,'' argues this psychologist and philosopher, ``it will be because people will obey those who command them to push the deadly buttons; because they will obey the archaic passions of fear, hate, and greed; because they will obey obsolete cliches of State sovereignty and national honor.''
The Lottery
382(9)
Shirley Jackson
In a small town, young and old gather each year to meet their community obligation.
Synthesis Activities
391(2)
Research Activities
393(3)
Philosophy/Religion
The Book of Job
396(89)
The Bible and Suffering
400(7)
Peter Gomes
A minister in The Memorial Church at Harvard College, Gomes discusses the larger human context of human suffering in which Job is situated.
The Book of Job
407(28)
An ancient poet asks us to contemplate why bad things happen to good people---a question that, since ancient times, has vexed those who seek to understand why blameless people suffer.
An Introduction to Job
435(9)
David Neiman
Neiman sets Job in the philosophical and theological context of its day, comparing the view of God in Job to the view expressed by pagans.
The Book of Job and Ancient Near Eastern Tradition
444(8)
Carol A. Newsom
From her introduction in The New Interpreter's Bible, Newsom writes on Job's complex history of authorship and sets it in a cultural context of ancient Near Eastern literature.
When Bad Things Happen to Good People
452(12)
Harold S. Kushner
Kushner wrote his well-known book in response to the loss of his son to a rare disease. Rather than deny God's existence or accept a God who would knowingly let the innocent suffer, Rabbi Kushner prefers to believe in a God who is not all powerful (who could not, for instance, prevent a child from contracting a fatal illness).
The Myth of Justice
464(5)
Michael Dorris
The late novelist and essayist bitterly rejects the idea of justice, both in this world and the next. Justice here, writes Dorris, doesn't exist: As for eternal justice in the afterlife, that's an illusion (a ``palliative myth'') that keeps us happy in an otherwise disappointing world.
Job: Implications for Today
469(5)
Dianne Bergant
A professor of Biblical Studies finds in Job a universal story that speaks directly to us. She writes: ``The horrors of war, or of ethnic, racial, sexual, or other social discrimination or brutality victimize countless women and men and defy all standards of justice and harmony.... [T]he human miseries often lead to an even greater tragedy---the denial of any meaning of life.''
God Has Need of Man
474(7)
Archibald MacLeish
The dramatist observes that Job, despite his cruel tests, never loses his love of God. It is this love, in spite of his (and our) inability to explain suffering, that makes life beautiful and allows us to ``hold together in one thought those terrible opposites of good and evil.''
Synthesis Activities
481(3)
Research Activities
484(1)
Biology/Genetics
The Brave New World of Biotechnology
485(106)
Brave New World
490(11)
Aldous Huxley
Tour the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre, where human embryos are incubated and hatched, their intelligence and social class determined before ``birth.''
Recombinant DNA and Genetic Engineering
501(23)
Cecie Starr
Ralph Taggart
The authors of a leading college biology text explain how genetic engineering works, what benefits it provides, and the kind of ethical dilemmas it creates.
Tinkering with Destiny
Shannon Brownlee
Gareth G. Cook
Viva Hardigg
Human gene therapy promises to revolutionize the ways in which we diagnose and treat disease. But family members, scientists, counselors, doctors, and entrepreneurs are not always prepared to deal with the issues raised by the new biotechnology.
The Grandiose Claims of Geneticists
524(5)
Dorothy Nelkin
Yes, biotechnology is very promising, acknowledges sociologist Dorothy Nelkin; but ``scientists should restrain their tendencies to oversell their work'' and they should be particularly sensitive to the ``possibilities for pernicious abuse.''
The Human Genome Project: A Personal View
529(8)
James D. Watson
The co-discoverer of the double helix structure of DNA explains and defends one of the most massive scientific undertakings of our time: ``a glorious enterprise'' that seeks to determine the complete genetic blueprint of a human being. The Human Genome Project could lead, he contends, to cures for cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and other human maladies.
Iceland's Blond Ambition
537(5)
Eliot Marshall
An editor for Science Magazine reports on a company that is hunting for the genetic bases of disease---and for profits---in Iceland.
The Ultimate Therapy: Commercial Eugenics on the Eve of the Biotech Century
542(14)
Jeremy Rifkin
A long-standing critic of genetic technologies raises a cautionary flag about the profit motive in genetic research.
Fatalist Attraction: The Dubious Case Against Fooling Mother Nature
556(5)
Virginia I. Postrel
The editor of the libertarian Reason magazine argues that the needs of patients and the services of physician/researchers---that is, the free market---should determine which genetic therapies become available.
When Science Takes the Witness Stand
561(16)
Peter J. Neufeld
Neville Colman
DNA fingerprinting, we have been told, can provide irrefutable evidence of guilt. But does it? A defense attorney, Peter J. Neufeld, and a physician, Neville Colman, writing in Scientific American, look skeptically on the vaunted forensic applications for genetic matching, pointing out that there is a significant gap between scientific and judicial standards of evidence.
DNA in Court
577(9)
William Tucker
DNA evidence sufficiently reliable? Controversial among scientists? It just isn't so, argues William Tucker, a staffwriter for the American Spectator. The politics of DNA evidence favors high-rolling defense attorneys who often mount successful objections to the use of genetic fingerprinting by overworked prosecutors.
Synthesis Activities
586(2)
Research Activities
588(3)
Folklore
Fairy Tales: A Closer Look at ``Cinderella''
591(74)
Universality of the Folktale
593(4)
Stith Thompson
A folklorist, exploring the significance of telling tales, finds them to be ``far older than history, and...not bounded by one continent or one civilization.''
Nine Variants of ``Cinderella''
597(41)
The much-loved ``Cinderella'' is found in all parts of the world. More than seven hundred versions exist; we include nine of them here.
Cinderella
598(4)
Charles Perrault
Ashputtle
602(5)
Jakob
Wilhelm Grimm
When the Clock Strikes
607(12)
Tanith Lee
A Chinese ``Cinderella''
619(2)
Tuan Ch'eng Shih
The Maiden, the Frog, and the Chief's Son (An African ``Cinderella'')
621(4)
Oochigeaskw---The Rough Faces Girl (A Native American ``Cinderella'')
625(2)
Walt Disney's ``Cinderella''
627(3)
Campbell Grant
Cinderella
630(3)
Anne Sexton
On Location: Airy Fairy Tale
633(5)
Richard Covington
A new ``anti-Disney'' filmed version of ``Cinderella.''
``Cinderella'': A Story of Sibling Rivalry and Oedipal Conflicts
638(8)
Bruno Bettelheim
A psychoanalytic reading of ``Cinderella'': Every child believes at some period in his life...that because of his secret wishes, if not also his clandestine actions, he deserves to be degraded, banned from the presence of others, relegated to a nether-world of smut.''
Pretty Woman: A Modern Cinderella
646(11)
Karol Kelley
A feminist historian examines two filmed versions of Perrault's ``Cinderella,'' Disney's animated version (1949) and Pretty Woman (1990), finding them remarkably similar.
Cinderella's Stepsisters
657(3)
Toni Morrison
In an address at Barnard College, the acclaimed novelist calls on women to treat one another more humanely than the stepsisters treated Cinderella.
Synthesis Activities
660(3)
Research Activities
663(2)
Law
You, the Jury
665(116)
The Maiden and the Pot of Gold: A Case of Emotional Distress
668(6)
Several men play a cruel practical joke on a gullible woman. She suffers ``mental suffering and humiliation.'' Then she sues.
The American Legal System
674(11)
David Hricik
What is the purpose of law? Where does it come from? Why do we have ``cases''? An attorney and teacher offers a primer for students of the law.
How to Present Your Case Systemically and Logically
685(13)
Veda R. Charrow
Myra K. Erhardt
Robert P. Charrow
How lawyers use the IRAC system to make persuasive arguments.
Venezia v. Miller Company: A Defective Beer Bottle?
698(6)
Ruthi Erdman
Should a brewer be liable for injuries suffered by a child who smashed a beer bottle against a telephone pole? A model IRAC analysis.
The Ridiculed Employee: An Additional Case of Emotional Distress
704(6)
Does an employee have a case against a supervisor who repeatedly makes fun of his stuttering?
Assault and Battery on the Gridiron: A Case of Reckless Disregard of Safety
710(8)
A football player, struck by the opposing team's fullback, calls his lawyer.
Of Accidents and Injuries: Some Cases of Negligence
718(17)
Woman orders 49-cent coffee from McDonald's, collects $2.9 million after it spills on her. Man jumps in front of moving New York City subway train then sues transit company; and other cases.
``Urban War Zone'': A Case of Public Nuisance
735(8)
A city seeks an injunction against a gang that has been harassing, intimidating, and threatening residents of a neighborhood. But not all members of the gang have committed crimes. Is the injunction constitutional?
The Felled Stop Signs: Some Cases of Homicide
743(10)
Teens out for a night of pranks pull out and bend down stop signs. Result: a fatal accident the next day. Of what are the culprits guilty?
Drag Racing and Death: Some Cases of Manslaughter
753(10)
Should someone who participates in a drag race be charged with homicide if he was not driving the car directly involved in the fatal accident?
Chevrolet v. Tree: A Case of Poetic Justice
763(3)
``A wayward Chevy struck a tree, Whose owner sued defendants three...''
Legal Glossary
766(6)
Don't know the difference between a tort and a tart? Between the ``appellee'' and the ``appellant''? Fear not: this handy glossary explains all.
Research Activities
772(1)
Legal Research
772(7)
Research Topics
779(2)
Film Studies
The Beast Within: Perspectives on the Horror Film
781(91)
Why We Crave Horror Movies
784(3)
Stephen King
The prolific novelist suggests that when we watch scary movies, ``we are daring the nightmare.'' Horror movies allow the irrational and antisocial impulses that we all harbor a brief period of free (and harmless) reign. They allow us to throw ``raw meat'' to our psychic alligators.
Horror Films
787(6)
Tim Dirks
When was the first Frankenstein film made? Who was the original wolf man? What are the best horror films of the last 20 years? In this entertaining survey of horror films---part of his ``Greatest Films'' website---Tim Dirks tells you (among other things) the terrible indignities suffered over the years by Count Dracula.
The Nightmare World
793(8)
Stanley J. Solomon
It may be a nightmare world, but it does have rules. Film scholar Solomon discusses the conventions of the horror genre and explains the psychological reasons horror films are scarier---more nightmarish---than science fiction films.
Blowing the Lid Off the Id
801(8)
Harvey Greenberg
A psychoanalyst considers the ``beast within'' motif in horror and science fiction, films in which the hero and the villain live within the same body, the same brain. Greenberg focuses on The Wolf Man, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and the Freudian ``Id-Monster'' in Forbidden Planet.
Metamorphosis: Humans into Animals
809(8)
Joyce E. Salisbury
A professor of history demonstrates that the motif of humans transformed into beasts, and back again into humans, can be traced back to ancient Rome. Focusing on several medieval stories, Salisbury shows how early some werewolf tales were suffused with Christian belief.
The Company of Wolves
817(9)
Angela Carter
In this contemporary retelling of Little Red Riding Hood, Carter, a British writer with a feminist, psychological stance, offers some unusual and unsettling stories about wolves and young women.
Wolf at the Door: An Interview with Neil Jordan
826(5)
Neil Jordan
After directing the film version of Angela Carter's Company of Wolves (1984), Neil Jordan explains what appealed to him about the story, how it was filmed, and the kind of reactions he was trying to evoke from audiences.
Two Reviews of Company of Wolves
831(4)
Lawrence O'Toole
J. Hoberman
Two critical reactions to the film version of The Company of Wolves.
Reviews of Wolf
835(8)
Caryn James
David Denby
Janet Maslin
Three critical reviews of one of the latest versions of the ``wolf man'' motif: the 1994 Wolf, directed by Mike Nichols, and starring Jack Nicholson and Michelle Pfeiffer.
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
843(18)
Robert Louis Stevenson
Excerpts from the classic psychological fable of humans' dual nature---beast and angel: The civilized and gentle (but intellectually arrogant) Dr. Jekyll conducts a fatal experiment, attempting to separate the good and the evil locked in conflict within us all. At first Mr. Hyde comes only when called. But then...
Reviews of Jekyll and Hyde Films
861(6)
Mordaunt Hall
Roger Ebert
Reviews of three of the numerous films based on Stevenson's story: the 1931 adaptation by Rouben Mamoulian, starring Fredric March; the 1941 version directed by Victor Fleming, starring Spencer Tracy; and the 1996 variant entitled Mary Reilly (Jekyll's housemaid), directed by Stephen Frears, starring Julia Roberts and John Malkovich.
Synthesis Activities
867(2)
Research Activities
869(3)
Credits 872(6)
Index of Authors and Titles 878


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