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Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum, Brief Edition

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780321395818

ISBN10:
0321395816
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Longman

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 1/1/2007.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

This portable writing guide and reader presents five highly engaging chapters of readings from five disciplines (communication, psychology, sociology, health, marketing) and a brief writing guide that covers the skills of summary, critique, analysis, and synthesis. Teaches readers source-based writing skills and offers highly engaging readings.Writing skills of summary, critique, analysis, and synthesis; Cyberspace and Identity; Obedience to Authority; Whatrs"s Happening at the Mall?rs"; The Weight Debate; Six Decades of Advertising. General interest in writing and on current topics.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
A Note to the Student xxi
Part I How to Write Summaries, Critiques, Syntheses, and Analyses
1(104)
Summary
3(21)
What Is a Summary?
3(1)
Can a Summary Be Objective?
3(1)
Using the Summary
4(1)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Summaries?
4(1)
The Reading Process
5(2)
Box: Critical Reading for Summary
6(1)
How to Write Summaries
7(1)
Box: Guidelines for Writing Summaries
7(1)
Demonstration: Summary
8(13)
The Future of Love: Kiss Romance Goodbye. It's Time for the Real Thing
8(3)
Barbara Graham
Read, Reread, Highlight
11(2)
Divide Selection into Stages of Thought
13(1)
Write a One- or Two-Sentence Summary of Each Stage of Thought
14(1)
Write a Thesis: A One- or Two-Sentence Summary of the Entire Passage
15(2)
Write the First Draft of the Summary
17(1)
Summary 1: Combine Thesis Sentence with One-Sentence Section Summaries
17(1)
Discussion
18(1)
Summary 2: Combine Thesis Sentence, Section Summaries, and Carefully Chosen Details
18(2)
Discussion
20(1)
Exercise 1.1: Individual and Collaborative Summary Practice
21(1)
Avoiding Plagiarism
21(3)
Box: Rules for Avoiding Plagiarism
23(1)
Critical Reading and Critique
24(21)
Critical Reading
24(13)
Question Category 1: What Is the Author's Purpose in Writing? Does the Author Succeed in This Purpose?
24(1)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Critiques?
25(1)
Writing to Inform
25(1)
Evaluating Informative Writing
26(1)
Writing to Persuade
26(1)
Exercise 2.1: Informative and Persuasive Thesis Statements
27(1)
Evaluating Persuasive Writing
28(1)
Exercise 2.2: Critical Reading Practice
28(1)
Persuasive Strategies
28(1)
Logical Argumentation: Avoiding Logical Fallacies
29(2)
Box: Tone
31(2)
Exercise 2.3: Understanding Logical Fallacies
33(1)
Writing to Entertain
33(1)
Question Category 2: To What Extent Do You Agree or Disagree with the Author?
34(1)
Identify Points of Agreement and Disagreement
34(1)
Exercise 2.4: Exploring Your Viewpoints---in Three Paragraphs
35(1)
Explore the Reasons for Agreement and Disagreement: Evaluate Assumptions
35(2)
Critique
37(1)
How to Write Critiques
37(1)
Box: Guidelines for Writing Critiques
38(1)
Demonstration: Critique
38(6)
What Is the Author's Purpose in Writing?
39(1)
Does the Author Succeed in This Purpose?
39(1)
To What Extent Do You Agree or Disagree with the Author?
39(1)
Model Critique: A Critique of Greg Critser's ``Too Much of a Good Thing''
40(3)
Box: Critical Reading for Critique
43(1)
Exercise 2.5: Informal Critique of Sample Essay
43(1)
Discussion
43(1)
Practice Critique
44(1)
Synthesis
45(40)
What Is a Synthesis?
45(1)
Purpose
45(2)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Syntheses?
46(1)
Using Your Sources
47(1)
Types of Syntheses: Argument and Explanatory
48(2)
How to Write Syntheses
50(1)
Box: Guidelines for Writing Syntheses
50(1)
The Argument Synthesis
51(3)
The Elements of Argument: Claim, Support, and Assumption
52(1)
Exercise 3.1: Practicing Claim, Support, and Assumption
53(1)
Demonstration: Developing a Source-Based Argument Synthesis--- Volunteering in America
54(22)
A New Start for National Service
55(1)
John McCain
Evan Bayh
A Time to Heed the Call
56(1)
David Gergen
Volunteering in the United States, 2003
57(3)
Crito
60(1)
Plato
Politics and National Service: A Virus Attacks the Volunteer Sector
61(1)
Bruce Chapman
Consider Your Purpose
62(1)
Make a Claim: Formulate a Thesis
63(1)
Decide How You Will Use Your Source Material
64(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
64(1)
Formulate an Argument Strategy
65(1)
Draft and Revise Your Synthesis
66(1)
Model Synthesis: Keeping Volunteering Voluntary
67(6)
Discussion
73(3)
Developing and Organizing the Support for Your Arguments
76(6)
Summarize, Paraphrase, and Quote Supporting Evidence
76(1)
Provide Various Types of Evidence and Motivational Appeals
77(1)
Use Climactic Order
77(1)
Use Logical or Conventional Order
78(1)
Present and Respond to Counterarguments
78(1)
Use Concession
78(1)
Use Comparison and Contrast Synthesis
79(2)
Exercise 3.2: Comparing and Contrasting
81(1)
Avoid Common Fallacies in Developing and Using Support
81(1)
The Explanatory Synthesis
82(1)
Practice Explanatory Synthesis
82(1)
Summary
83(2)
Analysis
85(20)
What Is an Analysis?
85(2)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Analyses?
86(1)
Demonstration of Analysis
87(6)
The Plug-In Drug
87(1)
Marie Winn
Exercise 4.1: Reading Critically: Winn
88(1)
The Coming Apart of a Dorm Society
89(4)
Edward Peselman
Exercise 4.2: Reading Critically: Peselman
93(1)
How to Write Analyses
93(10)
Consider Your Purpose
93(1)
Locate an Analytical Principle
94(3)
Formulate the Argument
97(1)
Part 1 of the Argument
97(1)
Part 2 of the Argument
98(1)
Box: Guidelines for Writing Analysis
98(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
99(1)
Turn Key Elements of a Principle or Definition into Questions
99(1)
Develop the Paragraph-by-Paragraph Logic of Your Paper
99(2)
Box: Critical Reading for Analysis
101(1)
Draft and Revise Your Analysis
101(1)
Write an Analysis, Not a Summary
102(1)
Make Your Analysis Systematic
102(1)
Answer the ``So-What?'' Question
102(1)
Attribute Sources Appropriately
103(1)
Analysis: A Tool for Understanding
103(2)
Part II An Anthology of Readings
105(402)
Technology/Communication
Cyberspace and Identity
107(63)
We've Got Mail---Always
110(5)
Andrew Leonard
Journey of an E-Mail
115(4)
John Dyson
The End of History
119(3)
Fred Kaplan
I Think, Therefore IM
122(4)
Jennifer Lee
The Blog Phenomenon
126(3)
John C. Dvorak
The Intimacy of Blogs
129(3)
Michael Snider
A Shared Sadness
132(5)
Russ Parsons
Virtual Love
137(8)
Meghan Daum
Cyberspace and Identity
145(9)
Sherry Turkle
Boy, You Fight Like a Girl
154(5)
Alex Pham
The 15-Year-Old Legal Whiz
159(6)
Michael Lewis
Synthesis Activities
165(3)
Research Activities
168(2)
Psychology
Obedience to Authority
170(75)
The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism
172(4)
Marianne Szegedy-Maszak
Opinions and Social Pressure
176(7)
Solomon E. Asch
The Perils of Obedience
183(13)
Stanley Milgram
Review of Stanley Milgram's Experiments on Obedience
196(6)
Diana Baumrind
Obedience
202(12)
Ian Parker
The Stanford Prison Experiment
214(12)
Philip G. Zimbardo
Disobedience as a Psychological and Moral Problem
226(6)
Erich Fromm
The Genocidal Killer in the Mirror
232(2)
Crispin Sartwell
Just Do What the Pilot Tells You
234(4)
Theodore Dalrymple
Synthesis Activities
238(4)
Research Activities
242(3)
American Studies
What's Happening at the Mall?
245(88)
Shopping for American Culture
248(7)
James Farrell
A Social History of Shopping
255(12)
Laura Paquet
Main Street Revisited
267(6)
Richard Francaviglia
Shopping Towns USA
273(6)
Victor Gruen
Larry Smith
Enclosed. Encyclopedic. Endured: One Week at the Mall of America
279(7)
David Guterson
The Shopping Mall as Sacred Space
286(9)
Ira Zepp, Jr.
From Town Center to Shopping Center
295(16)
Lizabeth Cohen
Community Through Exclusion and Illusion
311(12)
George Lewis
Mallaise: How to Know If You Have It
323(4)
William Kowinski
Synthesis Activities
327(3)
Research Activities
330(3)
Nutrition
Weight Debate
333(76)
Rethinking Weight
335(8)
Amanda Spake
Caloric Imbalance and Public Health Policy
343(7)
Jeffrey P. Koplan
William H. Dietz
Prevalence of Obesity Among U.S. Adults, by Characteristics and by State
350(4)
Too Much of a Good Thing
354(4)
Greg Critser
NAAFA Policy on Dieting and the Diet Industry
358(4)
Fat and Happy: In Defense of Fat Acceptance
362(5)
Mary Ray Worley
Too ``Close to the Bone'': The Historical Context for Women's Obsession with Slenderness
367(13)
Roberta Seid
Fat and Happy?
380(8)
Hillel Schwartz
The Ironic Politics of Obesity
388(2)
Marion Nestle
The Man Who Couldn't Stop Eating
390(14)
Atul Gawande
Synthesis Activities
404(2)
Research Activities
406(3)
Business
New and Improved: Six Decades of Advertising
409(98)
Advertising's Fifteen Basic Appeals
412(18)
Jib Fowles
Making the Pitch in Print Advertising
430(6)
Courtland L. Bovee
John V. Thill
George P. Dovel
Marian Burk Wood
Elements of Effective Layout
436(4)
Dorothy Cohen
The Indictments Against Advertising
440(6)
Courtland L. Bovee
William F. Arens
A Portfolio of Advertisements: 1945-2003
446(56)
Synthesis Activities
502(3)
Research Activities
505(2)
Credits 507(4)
Index 511


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