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Writing Situations, Brief Edition,9780205735648
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Writing Situations, Brief Edition

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780205735648

ISBN10:
0205735649
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/10/2014
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $69.33

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Summary

Bridge from everyday writing to writing in any situation.

 

College students write regularly in personal and social settings, but they often find it challenging to transition successfully to academic contexts. By building from their everyday writing experience, Writing Situations with MyWritingLab prepares students to analyze, navigate, and write effectively in any situation. Author Sid Dobrin presents a rhetorical situation both nuanced and practical, grounded not only in audience, purpose, and context but also impacted by medium, methodology, and relationships among stakeholders. Writing Situations provides a framework and a process for students to apply to any writing project and any situation.

 

0321866150 / 9780321866158 Writing Situations, Brief Edition Plus MyWritingLab with eText -- Access Card Package

Package consists of:   

0205735649 / 9780205735648 Writing Situations, Brief Edition

0205870147 / 9780205870141 NEW MyWritingLab with Pearson eText -- Valuepack Access Card

Table of Contents

Contents

 

Preface

 

Part One: Writing Processes

 

1. Understanding Rhetorical Situations

Writing in College

Rhetorical Situations

Rhetorical Ecology

Responding to Situations

A Situation of Writing

 

2. Purpose and Audience

Writing Processes

Rhetorical Purpose

Audience

Transnational Audiences

Visuals, Audience, and Purpose

 

3. Generating Ideas

Strategies for Getting Started

Reading

Thinking

Questioning

Writing

Remembering

Wandering

Discussing

Viewing

Dramatizing

Experimenting

 

4. Drafting and Organizing

Strategies for Drafting

Strategies for Organizing

Organizing by Time

Organizing by Type of Content

Organizing by Trait

Spatial Organization

 

5. Revising

Stages of Revising

Revising Globally

Revising Locally

Revise Your Visuals

Use Feedback to Revise

 

Part Two: Thinking, Reading, and Viewing

 

6. Thinking

Thinking

Intellectual Standards

Logic and Logical Fallacies

Problem Solving

Active Thinking

Networked Thinking

Visual Thinking

 

7. Reading and Viewing

Reading

Strategies for Active Reading

Strategies for Viewing

 

Part Three: Writing Projects

 

8. Writing to Narrate

Narration

Annotated Example: David P. Bardeen, “Lives, Not Close Enough for Comfort”

Student Example: Summer Woods, “A Southern State of Mind”

The Road to a Strong Thesis

Example: Diane Hamill Metzger, “The Manipulation Game: Doing Life in Pennsylvania”

Side by Side

Prepare and Respond

Visual Narrative: Matt Madden, from 99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style

Mapping Your Situation

Literacy Narratives

Writing Projects

        Essay ª Literacy Narrative ª Visual ª Digital ª Research ª Radical Revision

Visual Narratives

Writing Process Guidelines

        Seeking Feedback

        Thinking and Writing about the Chapter

Reflection ª Discussion Threads ª Collaborating ª Writing ª Local Situation

 

 

9. Writing to Describe

Description

Annotated Example: Rachel Carson, From The Edge of the Sea

Student Example: Ndidi Madu, “NCAA Tournament Experience”

The Road to a Strong Thesis

Example: Jeffrey Tayler, “The Sacred Grove of Oshogbo.”

Side by Side

Prepare and Respond

Mapping Your Situation

Search Engine Optimization

Writing Projects

        Essay ª Visual ª Digital ª Research ª Radical Revision

Visuals That Describe

Writing Process Guidelines

        Seeking Feedback

        Thinking and Writing about the Chapter

Reflection ª Discussion Threads ª Collaborating ª Writing ª Local Situation

 

 

10. Writing to Inform

Informative Writing

Annotated Example: Contemporary Hispanic Biography, Celia Cruz

Student Example: Berthrude Albert, “The Stand Against Social Injustice: Projects For Haiti, Inc.”

The Road to a Strong Thesis

Example: Lisa Hix, “The Inside Scoop on the Fake Barf Industry.”

Side by Side

Prepare and Respond

Mapping Your Situation

Writing Projects

        Essay ª Visual ª Digital ª Research ª Radical Revision

Visuals that Inform

Writing Process Guidelines

        Seeking Feedback

        Thinking and Writing about the Chapter

Reflection ª Discussion Threads ª Collaborating ª Writing ª Local Situation

 

 

11. Writing to Respond

Writing to Respond

Annotated Example: David Leavitt, “Men in Love: Is Brokeback Mountain a Gay Film?”

Student Example: Alexandra Bargoot, Argument in Response to “Importance of Education Lost in the Mix”

The Road to a Strong Thesis

Example: Ta-Nehisi Coates, “Nothing is So Necessary for a Young Man…”.”

Side by Side

Prepare and Respond

Two Common Organizational Strategies for Writing Responses

Mapping Your Situation

Writing Projects

        Essay ª Visual ª Digital ª Research ª Radical Revision

Writing Process Guidelines

        Seeking Feedback

        Thinking and Writing about the Chapter

                Reflection ª Discussion Threads ª Collaborating ª Writing ª Local Situation

 

 

12. Writing to Analyze

Analysis

Annotated Example: Tim Collins, “Straight from the Heart.”

Student Example: Emilia Maria “Nicky” Cadiz, “The Jersey Shore and Harper’s Bazaar.”

The Road to a Strong Thesis

Example: Annalee Newitz, “When Will White People Stop Making Movies like ‘Avatar’?”

Side by Side

Prepare and Respond

Mapping Your Situation

Writing Projects

        Essay ª Visual ª Digital ª Research ª Radical Revision

Analyzing Visuals

Writing Process Guidelines

Seeking Feedback

        Thinking and Writing about the Chapter

                Reflection ª Discussion Threads ª Collaborating ª Writing ª Local Situation

 

13. Writing to Evaluate

Evaluation

Annotated Example: Edward C. Baig,  “Review: Sony Tablet P Shows 2 Screens Aren't Better than 1.”

Student Example: Quang Ly, “Have You Been Bitten? Evaluating the Twilight Craze.”

The Road to a Strong Thesis

Example: Sean McCoy, “Square Water Bottle Raises $126K on Kickstarter: We Test It Out”

Side by Side

Prepare and Respond

Developing Criteria for an Evaluation

Organizing an Evaluation

Mapping Your Situation

Writing Projects

        Essay ª Visual ª Digital ª Research ª Radical Revision

Visuals and Evaluation

Writing Process Guidelines

Seeking Feedback

        Thinking and Writing about the Chapter

                Reflection ª Discussion Threads ª Collaborating ª Writing ª Local Situation

 

 

14. Writing to Argue

Argument

Formal Argumentation

Annotated Example: Pete Singer, “Animal Rights.”

Student Example: Lauren Brooke Horn, “The First-Year Dilemma: To Write or Not to Write?”

The Road to a Strong Thesis

Example: Tim Wise, “Whites Swim in Racial Preference.”

Side by Side

Prepare and Respond

Organizational Approaches to Argument

Mapping Your Situation

Visuals and Argumentation

Student Visual Example: Ian Rowe, “A Day in the Life of Your Child on Adderall”

Student Visual Example: Hyesu Grace Kim, “Self-Portrait”

Writing Projects

        Essay ª Visual ª Digital ª Research ª Radical Revision

Writing Process Guidelines

Seeking Feedback

        Thinking and Writing about the Chapter

                Reflection ª Discussion Threads ª Collaborating ª Writing ª Local Situation

 

 

15. Writing to Propose

Writing to Propose

Annotated Example: Joan Didion, “In Bed”

Student Example: Eric Trotta, “Handling the Snakehead Invasion”

The Road to a Strong Thesis

Example: Paul Goodman, “A Proposal to Abolish Grading.”

Side by Side

Prepare and Respond

Organizational Approaches for Writing to Propose

Mapping Your Situation

College Research and Topic Proposals

Writing Projects

        Essay ª Visual ª Digital ª Research ª Radical Revision

Visuals and Proposals

Writing Process Guidelines

        Thinking and Writing about the Chapter

                Reflection ª Discussion Threads ª Collaborating ª Writing ª Local Situation

 

 

Part Four: Writing Visuals

 

16. Finding, Adapting, and Making Visuals

Processes for Finding, Adapting, and Making Visuals

Finding and Adapting

Ethics and Locating/Adapting Visuals

Making Visuals

Student Example: “The Roman Baths of England: A Visual History,” Mariah O’Toole

 

17. Designing Documents

Document Design

Before: Traditional Report Format

After: Report Design Makeover

Understanding Design Processes

 

Part Five: Writing Research

 

18. Planning and Conducting Research

Research

Developing a Research Plan

Attributing Research

Developing Criteria for Analyzing and Evaluating Sources

Conducting Research

Using Library Resources

Using Online Resources

Conducting Primary Research

 

19. Evaluating and Synthesizing Information 

Taking Notes

Evaluating Sources

Synthesis

Synthesizing Research 

Quoting Research

Paraphrasing Research

Summarizing Research

When to Quote, Paraphrase, and Summarize

Avoid Plagiarism

 

20. Presenting and Documenting Research 

Student Example: Summer Woods, “From Protest to Resistance”

Developing a Research Plan

Locating and Evaluating Resources

Mapping Your Research

Attributing and Documenting Sources

 

21. Responding to Essay Exams

Writing College-Level Essay Exams

Preparing for Essay Exams

Taking Essay Exams

 

 

Credits

 

Index



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