You Don't Know Me but You Don't Like Me : Phish, Insane Clown Posse, and My Mind-Melting Migratory Misadventures with Two of Music's Most Maligned Tribes

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  • Edition: Original
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 6/11/2013
  • Publisher: Scribner
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Filled with veteran pop culture writer Nathan Rabin's "trademark humor, quirkiness, and self-deprecation" ( USA TODAY) comes a gonzo exploration of two of music's most obsessed fanbases: Phish's neo-hippie following and hip-hop duo Insane Clown Posse's "Juggalos." When memoirist and head writer for The A.V. ClubNathan Rabin first set out to write about obsessed music fans, he had no idea the journey would take him to the deepest recesses of both the pop culture universe and his own mind. For two very curious years, Rabin, who Mindy Kaling called "smart and funny" in The New Yorker, hit the road with two of music's most well-established fanbases: Phish's hippie fans and Insane Clown Posse's notorious "Juggalos." Musically or style-wise, these two groups could not be more different from each other, and Rabin, admittedly, was a cynic about both bands. But once he gets deep below the surface, past the caricatures and into the essence of their collective cultures, he discovers that both groups have tapped into the human need for community. While studying these two maligned musical groups, Rabin grapples with his own mental well-beinghe discovers that he is bipolarand his journey is both a prism for cultural analysis and a deeply personal exploration. With equal parts humor and heart, You Don't Know Me But You Don't Like Meoffers a smart, exhilarating look at Rabin's experience with two critically neglected touchstones of American popular music.

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