9780767932462

You Are One-Third Daffodil

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780767932462

  • ISBN10:

    0767932463

  • Format: Trade Paper
  • Copyright: 2009-09-08
  • Publisher: Three Rivers Press
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Summary

Does anyone know that most toilets flush in E-flat? Or that American Airlines had once saved $40,000 by removing a single olive from each salad served in first class? Well, now readers will with this clever, fun, and occasionally shocking compendium of facts from around the world.

Author Biography

Tom Nuttall compiled the In Fact column, upon which this book is based, for Prospect, a British magazine of politics and culture, between 2002 and 2008. He lives in London.

Excerpts

Coming into This World . . .

Facts About Birth and Babies

At birth, most babies cry at C or C-sharp.

—FINANCIAL TIMES, JULY 31, 2003



At a rough estimate, each newly conceived human has around three hundred harmful genetic mutations. —EDGE.ORG



The “happiness boost” that men gain from a firstborn son is 75 percent larger than from a firstborn daughter. Second and third children don’t contribute to the happiness of either parent.

—PSYCHOLOGY TODAY, APRIL 12, 2007

Every day, 44,000 babies are born in China—roughly the population of Canterbury.

—PROSPECT RESEARCH



Most babies in Britain are conceived without the conscious consent of the father.

—INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC POLICY RESEARCH



Sixty percent of newborn babies in India would be in intensive care if born in California.

—STATE OF THE WORLD 2000



A boy born in Russia in 2004 had a lower life expectancy than one born in Bangladesh.

—THE NEW YORKER, OCTOBER 11, 2004



In 2006, for the first time, more French children were born out of wedlock than to married parents.

—REUTERS, JANUARY 15, 2008



Hong Kong’s fertility rate—1.02 children per woman—is the second lowest in the world. The rate in Macau is 0.91

—CIA WORLD FACTBOOK



In Berlin, 20 percent more babies were born in March 2007—nine months after the World Cup—than in March 2006. —FINANCIAL TIMES, JUNE 9, 2007



American women are 70 percent more likely to die in childbirth than Europeans.

—TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT, JUNE 1, 2007



Almost 1 percent of Guatemalan children are adopted by American families.

—THE NEW YORK TIMES, NOVEMBER 6, 2006



Eighty-six percent of fathers attend the birth of their children. —FATHERHOOD INSTITUTE

The fertility rate in the United States—2.1 children per woman—is the highest it has been for thirty-five years. —THE NEW YORK TIMES, FEBRUARY 1, 2008



In 2000, for the first time in more than two hundred years, more babies were born in France than in any other European country.

—OLD EUROPE? DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE AND PENSION REFORM BY DAVID WILLETTS, CENTER FOR EUROPEAN REFORM



New Zealand and Britain are two of the few countries in which a majority of married couples practicing family planning opt for male rather than female sterilization. —EARTH POLICY INSTITUTE



Forty-three percent of Americans approve of using gene therapy to enhance the physical and behavioral traits of children.

—THE PEW RESEARCH CENTER FOR THE PEOPLE & THE PRESS



By the age of fifteen, only half of American children live with both biological parents, compared with roughly two-thirds of Swedish, German, and French children and 90 percent of children in Spain and Italy. —THE AMERICAN PROSPECT, JUNE 2005



. . . And Leaving It

Facts About Death and Dying



Five people were killed by falling icicles in the central Russian town of Samara between February 23 and 25, 2008. —REUTERS, FEBRUARY 26, 2008



The Scottish suicide rate is almost double that of England: 21 per 100,000 people compared with 12 per 100,000. —FINANCIAL TIMES, JANUARY 16, 2004



The life expectancy of professional cyclists is about fifty. —THE NEW CRITERION, JUNE 2004



There are 87.4 violent deaths per 100,000 people in Lithuania: the highest figure in the world.

—WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION



Bird flu kills someone almost every week in Ind

Excerpted from You Are One-Third Daffodil - And Other Facts to Turn Your World Upside Down
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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