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The Young Child In The Family And The Community,9780131189218

The Young Child In The Family And The Community

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131189218

ISBN10:
0131189212
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $61.33

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2006.
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Summary

For courses in Child, Family, and Community and Parents/Home-School Relations in Early Child Education. This exciting revision differs from our other text offerings for this course(Berger, Barbour, Wright/Stegelin) in that it focuses primarily on the young child's socialization. So, if social competence and socialization are important to you, this text is one for consideration. Recognizing that socialization is one of the most important aspects of child development, this lively and engaging book examines socialization issues of young children during child rearing, in child care facilities, and in the early education system within a developmental context. Child development as it relates to a child's first eight years, to a healthy family, and to a multicultural community is presented to students through personal stories, vignettes, pictures, and a wealth of examples.

Table of Contents

PART 1 The Child: Socialization in a Developmental Context
1(102)
Attachment
4(26)
Attachment and Trust
6(3)
How Attachment Occurs
9(2)
Attachment Behaviors
11(1)
Signs of Attachment in Parents
11(1)
Signs of Attachment in Infants
11(1)
Obstacles to Attachment
12(3)
Temperament and Attachment
14(1)
Developmental Differences
15(1)
Learning to Cope with Feelings of Loss
15(3)
Varying Attachment Patterns
18(2)
Bowlby and Ainsworth's Research
18(1)
Questions About Classic Attachment Research
19(1)
Attachment and Infant Mortality
20(1)
Judging Attachment in a Cross-Cultural Situation
21(1)
Child Care and Attachment
22(4)
Effects of Child Care on Attachment
22(2)
How Caregiver and Parent Roles Differ
24(1)
Attachment in Full-Inclusion Programs
25(1)
Summary
26(1)
For Discussion
26(1)
References
27(1)
Further Reading
28(2)
Autonomy
30(24)
Toddlers and Autonomy
32(1)
Signs of Developing Autonomy
32(8)
Negativity
33(1)
Exploration
33(2)
Self-Help Skills
35(3)
A Sense of Possession
38(2)
Dealing with Issues of Power and Control
40(7)
Set Up a Developmentally Appropriate Environment
40(1)
Appreciate Play
41(2)
Encourage Self-Help Skills
43(1)
Give Choices
43(1)
Provide Control
44(1)
Set Limits
45(2)
Coping with Loss and Separation
47(3)
Taking Separation in Small Steps
47(1)
Entering Child Care
48(2)
Partnering with Parents of Toddlers
50(1)
Summary
51(1)
For Discussion
51(1)
References
52(1)
Further Reading
53(1)
Initiative
54(26)
What Initiative Looks Like in a 4-Year-Old
56(1)
Analyzing Initiative in a 4-Year-Old
57(2)
Developmental Conflicts
59(2)
Autonomy Versus Shame and Doubt
59(1)
Initiative Versus Guilt
60(1)
Imagination and Fantasy
61(1)
The Value of Play of All Sorts
61(2)
How the Environment Contributes to a Sense of Initiative
63(3)
Dimensions of Play Environments
64(2)
How Adults Contribute to Children's Initiative
66(1)
Special Considerations for Children with Disabilities
66(1)
The Shy Child
67(2)
A Look at Aggression
69(2)
Causes of Aggression
69(2)
Teaching Young Children Problem-Solving Skills
71(3)
Empowering the Preschool-Age Child
74(3)
Summary
77(1)
For Discussion
77(1)
References
77(2)
Further Reading
79(1)
Self-Esteem
80(23)
Portrait of a Person with High Self-Esteem
82(1)
Definition of Self-Esteem
83(1)
Dimensions of Self-Esteem
84(2)
Significance
85(1)
Competence
86(1)
Power
86(1)
Virtue
86(1)
The Role of Beliefs and Expectations in Self-Esteem
86(2)
Where Does Self-Esteem Come From?
88(1)
Promoting Self-Esteem
89(4)
Give More Honest Feedback and Encouragement Than Praise
89(1)
Give Children Opportunities to Experience Success
90(3)
Children Learn from Failure
93(1)
Celebrating Differences: An Antibias Approach
94(5)
Bias Can Hurt
95(1)
Cultural Differences and Self-Esteem
96(3)
Summary
99(1)
For Discussion
100(1)
References
100(1)
Further Reading
101(2)
PART 2 The Family: Socialization for High Self-Esteem in Healthy Families
103(180)
Goals, Values, and Culture
108(28)
Relationship of Goals and Values to Child-Rearing Practices
110(1)
Cultural Differences in Goals and Values
111(2)
Contrasting Cultural Patterns
113(1)
When Parents and/or Caregivers or Teachers Have Conflicting Goals and Values
114(3)
What to Do When Conflicts Arise
117(6)
Build Relationships
121(1)
Know Yourself
121(1)
Work to Bring Differences Out in the Open
121(1)
Discuss Differences
122(1)
Become an Effective Cross-Cultural Communicator
122(1)
Problem Solve
122(1)
Commit Yourself to Education
122(1)
Helping Children Understand and Value Cultural Pluralism
123(1)
Teaching Morals and Values to Children
124(1)
Teaching Morals by Helping Children Examine Their Decision-Making Process
125(2)
Teaching Morals by Promoting Prosocial Development
127(3)
Summary
130(1)
For Discussion
130(1)
References
131(2)
Further Reading
133(3)
Child Care: An Extension of the Family
136(26)
Child Care as a Child-Rearing Environment
138(2)
Affordability and Availability
140(3)
Status and Salaries
141(2)
The State of Child Care in America Today
143(1)
Looking at Quality
143(2)
Adult-Child Interactions in Child Care and Early Education Settings
145(1)
Including Everybody: Children with Special Needs
146(1)
Partnering with Parents
147(2)
Questions Concerning Continuity Between Child Care and Home
149(3)
Parent-Professional Partnerships
152(4)
Roadblocks to Mutual Appreciation, Respect, and Support
153(3)
Summary
156(1)
For Discussion
156(1)
References
157(2)
Further Reading
159(3)
Disciplining for High Self-Esteem
162(20)
Defining the Word Discipline
164(1)
Problems with Using Punishment to Teach Young Children
165(2)
Guidelines for Disciplining Young Children
167(11)
Discipline as Preventing Unacceptable Behavior
168(4)
Discipline as Responding to Unacceptable Behavior
172(6)
Summary
178(1)
For Discussion
178(1)
References
178(2)
Further Reading
180(2)
Accepting Feelings
182(22)
What Are Feelings?
186(1)
All Feelings Are Positive
186(1)
Learning Feelings
186(9)
Social Referencing
187(3)
Cultural Scripts
190(1)
The Importance of Accepting Feelings
191(1)
Teaching Children Healthy Expressions of Feelings
192(3)
Teaching Children to Cope with Feelings
195(5)
Developing Self-Calming Skills
195(1)
Coping by Playing Pretend
196(1)
Coping with Simultaneous Feelings
197(1)
Coping with Anger
197(1)
Coping with Fear
198(2)
Summary
200(1)
For Discussion
201(1)
References
201(1)
Further Reading
202(2)
Problem Solving
204(20)
Problem Solving When Needs Conflict
206(1)
The Direct Order and Its Disadvantages
206(1)
The Fear-Inducing Approach and Its Disadvantages
206(1)
Issues Around Obedience
207(1)
Suffering Silently
207(1)
Suffering Openly
207(1)
Parenting Approaches
207(2)
The Authoritarian Approach
208(1)
The Permissive Approach
208(1)
The Authoritative Approach
208(1)
The Problem-Solving Process
209(7)
Problem Solving When the Child Has a Problem
211(1)
Problem Solving When the Adult Has the Problem
212(3)
Using the RERUN Process: An Example
215(1)
Problem Solving and Cognitive Development
216(3)
Child-Initiated Problems
217(1)
Adult-Initiated Problems
218(1)
Summary of Steps of Problem Solving
219(1)
Summary
220(1)
For Discussion
220(1)
References
221(1)
Further Reading
221(3)
Strokes and Affirmations: A Path to Self-Esteem
224(20)
What Are Strokes?
226(3)
Using Positive Strokes to Change Behavior
229(1)
What Are Affirmations?
229(6)
Affirmations Can Create Self-Fulfilling Prophecies
230(2)
Children's Response to Affirmations and Strokes
232(3)
Relation of Adult Self-Esteem to Building Self-Esteem in Children
235(2)
Changing Negative Messages to Positive Ones
235(2)
Self-Stroking
237(1)
Learning New Skills
238(4)
Tips for Getting Yourself Nurtured
240(2)
Summary
242(1)
For Discussion
242(1)
References
242(1)
Further Reading
243(1)
Modeling and Teaching Gender Roles
244(16)
Why Think About Teaching Gender Roles?
246(1)
The Women of Today
246(1)
Gender Equity and Child Rearing
247(3)
Toys and Gender Roles
248(1)
The Power of Language
249(1)
Using Modeling to Teach
250(1)
Differential Socialization
251(4)
Differential Treatment from Parents
252(1)
Differential Treatment in Preschool
253(1)
Differential Treatment in Elementary School
254(1)
The Role of Biology in Creating Differences Between Boys and Girls
255(1)
Guidelines for Parents and Early Childhood Educators
256(2)
Summary
258(1)
For Discussion
258(1)
References
258(1)
Further Reading
259(1)
Stress and Success in Family Life
260(23)
Successful Families
263(1)
Traits of Successful Families
264(8)
Sara's Family
265(1)
Roberto's Family
266(1)
Junior's Family
267(1)
Michael's Family
268(1)
Courtney's Family
268(1)
The Jackson Family
269(1)
Comparing the Six Families
270(2)
Stress as a Positive Force
272(2)
What We Can Learn from Studies of Resilient Children
274(1)
Helping All Children Become Resilient Children
275(3)
Summary
278(1)
For Discussion
278(1)
References
279(1)
Further Reading
279(4)
PART 3 The Community: Socialization in the Community Context
283(66)
Community Resources
288(18)
Social Networks
290(3)
Developing a Broad Base of Support
290(2)
Forms Social Networks May Take
292(1)
Community Institutions That Serve Families
292(1)
Families Using Community Resources
293(7)
Sara's Family
294(1)
Roberto's Family
295(1)
Junior's Family
296(1)
Michael's Family
297(1)
Courtney's Family
298(1)
The Jackson Family
299(1)
Connections to the Community
300(3)
A Summary of Community Resources
300(2)
Availability of Community Resources
302(1)
Summary
303(1)
For Discussion
303(1)
References
304(1)
Further Reading
304(2)
Socializing Agents
306(24)
Socialization and the Family
308(6)
The Issue of Bias
309(5)
Schools as Socializing Agents
314(6)
Getting into Kindergarten
314(4)
Classroom Behavior
318(1)
Responding to Diversity
319(1)
Inequity and Schools
320(1)
The Peer Group as an Agent of Socialization
320(3)
Functions of the Peer Group
322(1)
The Media as an Influence on Socialization
323(4)
Commercial Advertising
325(1)
Violence
325(2)
Summary
327(1)
For Discussion
327(1)
References
328(1)
Further Reading
329(1)
Social Policy Issues
330(19)
Who Is Responsible for America's Children?
332(3)
Children and Equal Opportunity
334(1)
Ready to Learn: A Goal for All of America's Children
335(4)
Head Start
336(1)
Child Care
337(2)
Moving Toward Full-Inclusion Programs
339(1)
Economic Development
340(1)
Adequate Health Services and Nutrition for All
340(1)
Taking a Preventive Approach
341(1)
Advocacy
342(2)
Summary
344(1)
For Discussion
344(1)
References
345(1)
Further Reading
346(3)
NAEYC Program Standards for Accreditation 349(4)
Index 353


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