9780130895608

Advanced Java(TM) 2 Platform How to Program

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780130895608

  • ISBN10:

    0130895601

  • Edition: CD
  • Format: Paperback w/CD
  • Copyright: 2002-01-01
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • View Upgraded Edition

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Summary

For intermediate or advanced Java programming courses in departments of Computer Science, CIS, MIS, IT, Business, and Continuing Education. Expanding on the world's best-selling Java textbook, Advanced Java 2 Platform How to Program includes an in-depth discussion of advanced topics, aiding developers in producing significant, scalable Java applications and distributed systems. Primarily based on Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) 1.2.1, Advanced Java 2 Platform How to Program integrates many technologies such as Extensible Markup Language (XML), JavaBeans, Security, Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), JavaServer Pages (JSP), servlets, Remote Method Invocation (RMI) and Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) into a production-quality system that allows developers to benefit from the leverage and platform independence provided by the Java 2 Enterprise Edition. The book also features the development of a complete, end-to-end e-business solution using advanced Java technologies.

Table of Contents

Preface xxi
Introduction
1(28)
Introduction
2(1)
Architecture of the Book
3(4)
Advanced GUI, Graphics and JavaBeans
3(1)
Distributed Systems
4(1)
Web Services
5(1)
Enterprise Java
5(1)
Enterprise Case Study
6(1)
XML
7(1)
Tour of the Book
7(11)
Running Example Code
18(1)
Design Patterns
19(10)
History of Object-Oriented Design Patterns
20(2)
Design Patterns Discussion
22(3)
Concurrency Patterns
25(1)
Architectural Patterns
26(1)
Further Study on Design Patterns
27(2)
Advanced Swing Graphical User Interface Components
29(56)
Introduction
30(1)
WebBrowser Using JEditorPane and JToolBar
30(9)
Swing Text Components and HTML Rendering
31(2)
Swing Toolbars
33(6)
Swing Actions
39(6)
JSplitPane and JTabbedPane
45(7)
Multiple-Document Interfaces
52(4)
Drag and Drop
56(6)
Internationalization
62(9)
Accessibility
71(7)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
78(7)
Model-View-Controller
85(50)
Introduction
86(1)
Model-View-Controller Architecture
86(2)
Observable Class and Observer Interface
88(19)
JList
107(4)
JTable
111(4)
JTree
115(20)
Using Default TreeModel
117(6)
Custom TreeModel Implementation
123(12)
Graphics Programming with Java 2D and Java 3D
135(84)
Introduction
136(1)
Coordinates, Graphics Contexts and Graphic Objects
136(2)
Java 2D API
138(22)
Java 2D Shapes
140(6)
Java 2D Image Processing
146(14)
Java 3D API
160(19)
Obtaining and Installing the Java 3D API
161(1)
Java 3D Scenes
161(2)
A Java 3D Example
163(16)
A Java 3D Case Study: A 3D Game with Custom Behaviors
179(40)
Case Study: Java 2D GUI Application with in Patterns
219(102)
Introduction
220(1)
Application Overview
220(1)
MyShape Class Hierarchy
221(21)
Deitel DrawingModel
242(12)
Deitel Drawing Views
254(6)
Deitel Drawing Controller Logic
260(27)
MyShapeControllers for Processing User Input
260(12)
MyShapeControllers and Factory Method Design Pattern
272(4)
Drag-and-Drop Controller
276(11)
DrawingInternalFrame Component
287(17)
ZoomDialog Action and Icon Components
304(5)
DeitelDrawing Application
309(12)
JavaBeans Component Model
321(65)
Introduction
322(1)
Using Beans in Forte for Java Community Edition
323(14)
Preparing a Class to be a JavaBean
337(3)
Creating a JavaBean: Java Archive Files
340(5)
JavaBean Properties
345(2)
Bound Properties
347(8)
Indexed Properties and Custom Events
355(9)
Customizing JavaBeans for Builder Tools
364(15)
PropertyEditors
371(4)
Customizers
375(4)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
379(7)
Security
386(58)
Introduction
387(1)
Ancient Ciphers to Modern Cryptosystems
388(1)
Secret-Key Cryptography
389(1)
Public-Key Cryptography
390(3)
Cryptoanalysis
393(1)
Key Agreement Protocols
393(1)
Key Management
394(1)
Java Cryptography Extension (JCE)
395(11)
Password-Based Encoding with JCE
395(10)
Decorator Design Pattern
405(1)
Digital Signatures
406(1)
Public-Key Infrastructure, Certificates and Certification Authorities
407(3)
Java Keystores and keytool
409(1)
Java Policy Files
410(3)
Digital Signatures for Java Code
413(4)
Authentification
417(6)
Kerberos
417(1)
Single Sign-On
417(1)
Java Authentification and Authorization Service (JAAS)
418(5)
Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
423(6)
Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE)
424(5)
Java Language Security and Secure Coding
429(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
430(14)
Java Database Connectivity (JDBC)
444(86)
Introduction
445(1)
Relational-Database Model
446(1)
Relational Database Overview: The books Database
447(5)
Structured Query Language (SQL)
452(11)
Basic SELECT Query
453(1)
WHERE Clause
454(2)
Order By Clause
456(3)
Merging Data from Multiple Tables: Joining
459(1)
Insert Into Statement
460(1)
Update Statement
461(1)
Delete From Statement
462(1)
Creating Database books in Cloudscape
463(1)
Manipulating Databases with JDBC
464(15)
Connecting to and Querying a JDBC Data Source
464(6)
Querying the Books Database
470(9)
Case Study: Address-Book Application
479(36)
PreparedStatements
480(2)
Transaction Processing
482(1)
Address-Book Application
482(33)
Stored Procedures
515(1)
Batch Processing
515(2)
Processing Multiple ResultSets or Update Counts
517(1)
Updatable ResultSets
518(1)
JDBC 2.0 Optional Package javax.sql
519(1)
DataSource
519(1)
Connection Pooling
519(1)
RowSets
520(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
520(10)
Servlets
530(63)
Introduction
531(2)
Servlet Overview and Architecture
533(6)
Interface Servlet and the Servlet Life Cycle
534(2)
HttpServlet Class
536(1)
HttpServletRequest Interface
537(1)
HttpServletResponse Interface
538(1)
Handling HTTP get Requests
539(10)
Setting Up the Apache Tomcat Server
543(2)
Deploying a Web Application
545(4)
Handling HTTP get Requests Containing Data
549(3)
Handling HTTP post Requests
552(4)
Redirecting Requests to Other Resources
556(3)
Session Tracking
559(18)
Cookies
560(9)
Session Tracking with HttpSession
569(8)
Multi-Tier Applications: Using JDBC from a Servlet
577(7)
HttpUtils Class
584(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
585(8)
JavaServer Pages (JSP)
593(67)
Introduction
594(1)
JavaServer Pages Overview
595(1)
A First JavaServer Page Example
596(2)
Implicit Objects
598(1)
Scripting
599(5)
Scripting Components
600(1)
Scripting Example
601(3)
Standard Actions
604(30)
<jsp: include> Action
605(5)
<jsp: forward> Action
610(3)
<jsp: plugin> Action
613(4)
<jsp: useBean> Action
617(17)
Directives
634(4)
page Directive
634(2)
include Directive
636(2)
Custom Tag Libraries
638(15)
Simple Custom Tag
639(4)
Custom Tag with Attributes
643(4)
Evaluating the Body of a Custom Tag
647(6)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
653(7)
Case Study: Servlet and JSP Bookstore
660(56)
Introduction
661(1)
Bookstore Architecture
662(2)
Entering the Bookstore
664(3)
Obtaining the Book List from the Database
667(9)
Viewing a Book's Details
676(7)
Adding an Item to the Shopping Cart
683(3)
Viewing the Shopping Cart
686(3)
Checking Out
689(4)
Processing the Order
693(1)
Deploying the Bookstore Application in J2EE 1.2.1
694(22)
Configuring the Books Data Source
695(1)
Launching the Cloudscape Database and J2EE Servers
695(1)
Launching the J2EE Application Deployment Tool
696(1)
Creating the Bookstore Application
697(1)
Creating BookServlet and AddToCartServlet Web Components
698(6)
Adding Non-Servlet Components to the Application
704(2)
Specifying the Web Context, Resource References, JNDI Names and Welcome Files
706(3)
Deploying and Executing the Application
709(7)
Java-Based Wireless Applications Development and J2ME
716(74)
Introduction
717(3)
WelcomeServlet Overview
720(6)
TipTestServlet Overview
726(31)
Internet Explorer Request
739(7)
WAP Request
746(5)
Pixo i-mode Request
751(4)
J2ME Client Request
755(2)
Java 2 Micro Edition
757(24)
Connected Limited Device Configuration (CLDC)
758(1)
Mobile Information Device Profile (MIDP)
759(2)
TipTestMIDlet Overview
761(20)
Installation Instructions
781(4)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
785(5)
Remote Method Invocation
790(56)
Introduction
791(1)
Case Study: Creating a Distributed System with RMI
792(1)
Defining the Remote Interface
792(1)
Implementing the Remote Interface
793(14)
Compiling and Executing the Server and the Client
807(2)
Case Study: Deitel Messenger with Activatable Server
809(31)
Activatable Deitel Messenger ChatServer
810(10)
Deitel Messenger Client Architecture and Implementation
820(16)
Running the Deitel Messenger Server and Client Applications
836(4)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
840(6)
Session EJBs and Distributed Transactions
846(58)
Introduction
847(1)
EJB Overview
847(2)
Remote Interface
848(1)
Home Interface
848(1)
EJB Implementation
849(1)
EJB Container
849(1)
Session Beans
849(30)
Stateful Session EJBs
849(13)
Deploying Session EJBs
862(7)
Stateless Session EJBs
869(10)
EJB Transactions
879(21)
MoneyTransfer EJB Home and Remote Interfaces
879(2)
Bean-Managed Transaction Demarcation
881(5)
Container-Managed Transaction Demarcation
886(6)
MoneyTransfer EJB Client
892(6)
Deploying the MoneyTransfer EJB
898(2)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
900(4)
Entity EJBs
904(33)
Introduction
905(1)
Entity EJB Overview
905(1)
Employee Entity EJB
906(1)
Employee EJB Home and Remote Interfaces
906(2)
Employee EJB with Bean-Managed Persistence
908(12)
Employee EJB Implementation
908(10)
Employee EJB Deployment
918(2)
Employee EJB with Container-Managed Persistence
920(5)
Employee EJB Client
925(9)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
934(3)
Messaging with JMS
937(53)
Introduction
938(1)
Installation and Configuration of J2EE 1.3
939(1)
Point-To-Point Messaging
940(11)
Voter Application: Overview
940(1)
Voter Application: Sender Side
941(4)
Voter Application: Receiver Side
945(6)
Voter Application: Configuring and Running
951(1)
Publish/Subscribe Messaging
951(17)
Weather Application: Overview
952(1)
Weather Application: Publisher Side
953(5)
Weather Application: Subscriber Side
958(9)
Weather Application: Configuring and Running
967(1)
Message-Driven Enterprise JavaBeans
968(22)
Voter Application: Overview
968(1)
Voter Application: Receiver Side
969(9)
Voter Application: Configuring and Running
978(12)
Enterprise Java Case Study: Architectural Overview
990(19)
Introduction
991(1)
Deitel Bookstore
992(1)
System Architecture
992(1)
Enterprise JavaBeans
993(2)
Entity EJBs
993(2)
Stateful Session EJBs
995(1)
Servlet Controller Logic
995(1)
XSLT Presentation Logic
995(14)
Enterprise Java Case Study: Presentation and Controller Logic
1009(64)
Introduction
1010(1)
XMLServlet Base Class
1011(11)
Shopping Cart Servlets
1022(18)
AddToCartServlet
1023(1)
ViewCartServlet
1023(11)
RemoveFromCartServlet
1034(1)
UpdateCartServlet
1034(5)
CheckoutServlet
1039(1)
Product Catalog Servlets
1040(13)
GetAllProductsServlet
1040(6)
GetProductServlet
1046(3)
ProductSearchServlet
1049(4)
Customer Management Servlets
1053(20)
RegisterServlet
1053(4)
LoginServlet
1057(3)
ViewOrderHistoryServlet
1060(4)
ViewOrderServlet
1064(3)
GetPasswordHintServlet
1067(6)
Enterprise Java Case Study: Business Logic Part 1
1073(44)
Introduction
1074(1)
EJB Architecture
1074(1)
ShoppingCart Implementation
1075(10)
ShoppingCart Remote Interface
1075(2)
ShoppingCartEJB Implementation
1077(7)
ShoppingCartHome Interface
1084(1)
Product Implementation
1085(9)
Product Remote Interface
1085(1)
ProductEJB Implementation
1086(2)
ProductHome Interface
1088(1)
ProductModel
1089(5)
Order Implementation
1094(13)
Order Remote Interface
1095(1)
OrderEJB Implementation
1095(6)
OrderHome Interface
1101(1)
OrderModel
1101(6)
OrderProduct Implementation
1107(10)
OrderProduct Remote Interface
1107(1)
OrderProductEJB Implementation
1108(2)
OrderProductHome Interface
1110(1)
OrderProductPK Primary-Key Class
1111(2)
OrderProductModel
1113(4)
Enterprise Java Case Study: Business Logic Part 2
1117(44)
Introduction
1118(1)
Customer Implementation
1118(13)
Customer Remote Interface
1119(1)
CustomerEJB Implementation
1119(7)
CustomerHome Interface
1126(1)
CustomerModel
1127(4)
Address Implementation
1131(13)
Address Remote Interface
1134(1)
AddressEJB Implementation
1134(4)
AddressHome Interface
1138(1)
AddressModel
1138(6)
SequenceFactory Implementation
1144(5)
SequenceFactory Remote Interface
1144(1)
SequenceFactoryEJB Implementation
1145
SequenceFactoryHome Interface
1144(5)
Deitel Bookstore Application Deployment with J2EE
1149(12)
Deploying Deitel Bookstore CMP Entity EJBs
1149(7)
Deploying Deitel Book store Servlets
1156(5)
Application Servers
1161(35)
Introduction
1162(1)
J2EE Specification and Benefits
1162(1)
Commercial Application Servers
1163(2)
BEA WebLogic 6.0
1163(1)
iPlanet Application Server 6.0
1164(1)
IBM WebSphere Advanced Application Server 4.0
1165(1)
JBoss 2.2.2 Application Server
1165(1)
Deploying the Deitel Bookstore on BEA WebLogic
1165(26)
Deploying the Deitel Bookstore on IBM WebSphere
1191(2)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1193(3)
Jini
1196(62)
Introduction
1197(1)
Installing Jini
1198(1)
Configuring the Jini Runtime Environment
1198(1)
Starting the Required Services
1199(4)
Running the Jini LookupBrowser
1203(1)
Discovery
1204(10)
Unicast Discovery
1204(5)
Multicast Discovery
1209(5)
Jini Service and Client Implementations
1214(18)
Service Interfaces and Supporting Classes
1214(3)
Service Proxy and Service Implementations
1217(3)
Registering the Service with Lookup Services
1220(3)
Jin iService Client
1223(9)
Introduction to High-Level Helper Utilities
1232(21)
Discovery Utilities
1232(10)
Entry Utilities
1242(2)
Lease Utilities
1244(4)
JoinManager Utility
1248(4)
Service Discovery Utilities
1252(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1253(5)
JavaSpaces
1258(61)
Introduction
1259(1)
JavaSpaces Service Properties
1260(1)
JavaSpaces Service
1260(2)
Discovering the Java Spaces Service
1262(2)
JavaSpace Interface
1264(1)
Defining an Entry
1265(1)
Write Operation
1266(3)
Read and Take Operations
1269(7)
Read Operation
1269(4)
Take Operation
1273(3)
Notify Operation
1276(5)
Method snapshot
1281(3)
Updating Entries with Jini Transaction Service
1284(10)
Defining the User Interface
1285(2)
Discovering the TransactionManager Service
1287(2)
Updating an Entry
1289(5)
Case Study: Distributed Image Processing
1294(20)
Defining an Image Processor
1295(6)
Partitioning an Image into Smaller Pieces
1301(11)
Compiling and Running the Example
1312(2)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1314(5)
Java Management Extensions (JMX) (on CD)
1319(45)
Introduction
1320(2)
Installation
1322(1)
Case Study
1322(38)
Instrument Resources
1322(16)
Implementation of the JMX Management Agent
1338(4)
Broadcasting and Receiving Notifications
1342(4)
Management Application
1346(11)
Compiling and Running the Example
1357(3)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1360(4)
Jiro (on CD)
1364(71)
Introduction
1365(1)
Installation
1366(1)
Starting Jiro
1367(2)
Dynamic vs. Static Services
1369(1)
Dynamic Services
1369(11)
Dynamic-Service Implementation
1370(10)
Static Services
1380(12)
Locating Static Services with Class ServiceFinder
1380(1)
Event Service
1381(8)
Log Service
1389(2)
Scheduling Service
1391(1)
Dynamic Service Deployment
1392(17)
Dynamic-Service Usage
1395(14)
Management Policies
1409(19)
Policy-Management Deployment
1420(8)
Closing Notes on the Printer Management Solution
1428(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1429(6)
Common Object Request Broker Architecture (RBA): Part 1 (on CD)
1435(73)
Introduction
1436(5)
Step-by-Step
1441(1)
First Example: SystemClock
1442(11)
SystemClock. id1
1443(1)
SystemClockImpl.java
1444(5)
SystemClockClient.java
1449(3)
Running the Example
1452(1)
Technical/Architectural Overview
1453(5)
COBRA Basics
1458(10)
Example: AlarmClock
1468(8)
AlarmClock.id1
1468(1)
AlarmClockImpl.java
1469(3)
AlarmClockClient.java
1472(4)
Distributed Exceptions
1476(4)
Case Study: Chat
1480(18)
chat.id1
1482(1)
ChatServerImp1.java
1483(5)
DeitelMessenger.java
1488(5)
Running Chat
1493(1)
Issues
1493(5)
Comments and Comparisons
1498(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1499(9)
Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA): Part 2 (on CD)
1508(40)
Introduction
1509(1)
Static Invocation Interface (SII). Dynamic Invocation Interface (DII) and Dynamic Skeleton Interface (DSI)
1510(4)
BOAs, POAs and TIEs
1514(2)
CORBAservices
1516(7)
Naming Service
1516(1)
Security Service
1517(1)
Object Transaction Service
1518(1)
Persistent State Service
1519(1)
Event and Notification Services
1520(3)
EJBs and CORBAcomponents
1523(6)
CORBA vs. RMI
1529(2)
When to Use RMI
1529(1)
When to Use CORBA
1530(1)
RMI-IIOP
1530(1)
RMIMessenger Case Study Ported to RMI-IIOP
1531(12)
ChatServer RMI-IIOP Implementation
1532(6)
ChatClient RMI-IIOP Implementation
1538(4)
Compiling and Running the ChatServer and ChatClient
1542(1)
Future Directions
1543(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1543(5)
Peer-to-Peer Applications and JXTA
1548(46)
Introduction
1549(1)
Client/Server and Peer-to-Peer Applications
1549(1)
Centralized vs. Decentralized Network Applications
1550(1)
Peer Discovery and Searching
1551(1)
Case Study: Deitel Instant Messenger
1551(2)
Defining the Service Interface
1553(2)
Defining the Service implementation
1555(7)
Registering the Service
1562(2)
Find Other Peers
1564(7)
Compiling and Running the Example
1571(1)
Improving Deitel Instant Messenger
1571(1)
Deitel Instant Messenger with Multicast Sockets
1572(16)
Registering the Peer
1572(5)
Finding Other Peers
1577(11)
Introduction to JXTA
1588(2)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1590(4)
Introduction to Web Services and SOAP
1594(17)
Introduction
1595(1)
Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)
1596(6)
SOAP Weather Service
1602(6)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1608(3)
A Creating Markup with XML (on CD) 1611(16)
Introduction
1612(1)
Introduction to XML Markup
1612(3)
Parsers and Well-Formed XML Documents
1615(1)
Characters
1616(2)
Characters vs. Markup
1616(1)
White Space, Entity References and Built-In-Entities
1616(2)
CDATA Sections and Processing Instructions
1618(2)
XML Namespaces
1620(3)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1623(4)
B Document Type Definition (DTD) (on CD) 1627(25)
Introduction
1628(1)
Parsers, Well-Formed and Valid XML Documents
1628(1)
Document Type Declaration
1629(1)
Element Type Declarations
1630(6)
Sequences, Pipe Characters and Occurrence Indicators
1631(3)
EMPTY Mixed Content and ANY
1634(2)
Attribute Declarations
1636(2)
Attribute Types
1638(6)
Tokenized Attribute Type (ID. IDREF. ENTITY. NMTOKEN)
1638(5)
Enumerated Attribute Types
1643(1)
Conditional Sections
1644(1)
Whitespace Characters
1645(2)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1647(5)
C Document Object Model (DOM™) (on CD) 1652(24)
Introduction
1653(1)
DOM with Java
1654(3)
Setup Instructions
1657(1)
DOM Components
1657(8)
Creating Nodes
1665(3)
Traversing the DOM
1668(3)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1671(5)
D XSL: Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XSLT) (on CD) 1676(23)
Introduction
1677(1)
Applying XSLTs with Java
1677(2)
Templates
1679(1)
Creating Elements and Attributes
1680(3)
Iteration and Sorting
1683(4)
Conditional Processing
1687(3)
Combining Style Sheets
1690(5)
Variables
1695(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1695(4)
E Downloading and Installing J2EE 1.2.1 (on CD) 1699(2)
Introduction
1699(1)
Installation
1699(1)
Configuration
1700(1)
JDBC Drivers and Data Sources
1700(1)
HTTP properties
1700(1)
F Java Community ProcessSM (JCP) (on CD) 1701(4)
Introduction
1701(1)
Participants
1701(1)
Program Management Office
1701(1)
Executive Committee
1701(1)
Experts
1702(1)
Members
1702(1)
Public Participation
1702(1)
Java Community Process
1702(3)
Initiation Phase
1702(1)
Community Draft Phase
1703(1)
Public Draft Phase
1704(1)
Final Phase
1704(1)
Maintenance Phase
1704(1)
G Java Native Interface (JNI) (on CD) 1705(33)
Introduction
1706(1)
Getting Started with Java Native Interface
1706(4)
Accessing Java Methods and Objects from Native Code
1710(8)
JNI and Arrays
1718(4)
Handling Exceptions with JNI
1722(11)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1733(5)
H Career Opportunities (on CD) 1738(24)
Introduction
1739(1)
Resources for the Job Seeker
1740(1)
Online Opportunities for Employers
1741(5)
Posting Jobs Online
1743(2)
Problems with Recruiting on the Web
1745(1)
Diversity in the Workplace
1745(1)
Recruiting Services
1746(2)
Testing Potential Employees Online
1747(1)
Career Sites
1748(6)
Comprehensive Career Sites
1748(1)
Technical Positions
1749(1)
Wireless Positions
1750(1)
Contracting Online
1750(1)
Executive Positions
1751(1)
Students and Young Professionals
1752(1)
Other Online Career Services
1753(1)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1754(8)
I Unicode® (on CD) 1762(12)
Introduction
1763(1)
Unicode Transformation Formats
1764(1)
Characters and Glyphs
1765(1)
Advantages/Disadvantages of Unicode
1766(1)
Unicode Consortium's Web Site
1766(1)
Using Unicode
1767(3)
Character Ranges
1770(4)
Index 1774

Excerpts

Live in fragments no longer. Only connect. Edward Morgan Forster Welcome toAdvanced Java 2 Platform How to Programand the exciting world of advanced-programming concepts with the three major Java platforms--Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE), Java 2 Standard Edition (J2SE)andJava 2 Micro Edition (J2ME).Little did we know when we attended the November 1995 Internet/World Wide Web conference in Boston what that session would yield--four editions ofJava How To Program(the world's best-selling Java textbook), and now this book about Java software-development technologies for upper-level college courses and professional developers. Before Java appeared, we were convinced that C++ would replace C as the dominant application-development language and systems-programming language for the next decade. However, the combination of the World Wide Web and Java now increases the prominence of the Internet in information-systems planning and implementation. Organizations want to integrate the Internet "seamlessly" into their information systems. Java is more appropriate than C++ for this purpose--as evidenced by Sun Microsystems' announcement in 2001 that over 96% of enterprise application servers support J2EE. Advanced Java 2 Platform How to Programis the first book in ourAdvanced How to Programseries. We discuss Java technologies that may be unfamiliar and challenging to the average Java programmer. We structured each chapter discussion to provide the reader with an introduction to leading-edge and complex Java technologies, rather than provide a detailed analysis of every nuance of each topic. In fact, each topic we present could be a 600-800 page book in itself. We use a different approach with the examples in this book than that of programming examples in our previous books. We provide fewer programs, but these programs are more substantial and illustrate sophisticated coding practices. We integrate many technologies to create a book for developers that enables you to "go beyond" and experiment with the most up-to-date technologies and most widely employed design concepts. What better way to learn than to work with actual technologies and code? When determining the appropriate topics for this book, we read dozens of journals, reviewed the Sun Microsystems Web site and participated in numerous trade shows. We audited our material against the latest technologies presented at the JavaOne conference--the leading Java-developer conference sponsored by Sun Microsystems--and at other popular Java conferences. We also reviewed books on specialized Java topics. After this extensive research, we created an outline for this book and sent it for professional review by Java experts. We found so many topics we wanted to include that we wound up with over 1800 pages of material (several hundred of those pages appear as PDF documents on the CD that accompanies this book). We apologize if this is inconvenient, but the material and the number of topics are voluminous. We will most likely split the next edition into two volumes. This book benefited from an unusually large pool of excellent reviewers and the detailed documentation that Sun makes available on their Web site ( www.sun.com ). We were excited to have a number of reviewers from Sun and many other distinguished industry reviewers. We wanted experienced developers to review our code and discussions, so we could offer "expert advice" from people who actually work with the technologies in industry. We are pleased to include a discussion of application servers in Chapter 21. The three most popular application server software products are BEA'sWebLogic,IBM'sWeb-Sphereand Sun/Netscape'siPlanet.Originally, we had planned to include all three on the book's accompanying CD, but we h

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