9780199269983

Beatson, Matthews & Elliot's Administrative Law Text and Materials

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780199269983

  • ISBN10:

    019926998X

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-08-18
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Beatson, Matthews & Elliott's Administrative Law--Text & Materials combines carefully selected extracts from key cases, articles and other sources with detailed commentary. Aimed at undergraduates studying administrative law, it provides comprehensive coverage of the subject, bringing together in one volume the best features of a textbook and a casebook.

Author Biography


Mark Elliot is currently a lecturer in law and assistant director of the Centre for Public Law at the University of Cambridge. He is also a Fellow of St Catherine's College, Cambridge. Sir Jack Beatson FBA, formerly Rouse Ball Professor of English Law at the University of Cambridge, is a Justice of the High Court, Queen's Bench Division. Martin Mattews is a Fellow and Praelector in Jurisprudence at University College, Oxford, and a C.U.F. Lecturer in Law at the University of Oxford.

Table of Contents

Introductory Matters
Administrative Law
1(1)
How is Good Administrative to be Secured?
1(5)
Red Light Theory
2(1)
Green Light Theory
3(2)
Why is Theory Important?
5(1)
The Changing Face of Judicial Review
6(5)
The Scope and Intensity of Review
6(2)
Why is Judicial Review Expanding?
8(1)
Is (More) Judicial Review a Good Thing?
9(2)
The Constitutional Basis of Judicial Review
11(13)
The Ultra Vires Doctrine
11(3)
The Common Law Theory
14(3)
Must Judicial Review be Related to Legislative Intention?
17(4)
The Modified Ultra Vires Theory
21(2)
Conclusion
23(1)
Administrative Power in the Modern Constitution
24(8)
Devolution
24(3)
Local Government
27(2)
Agencies and the Private Sector
29(3)
Concluding Remarks
32(2)
Further Resources
33(1)
Jurisdiction
Introduction
34(4)
What is `Jurisdiction'?
34(3)
Distinguishing Jurisdictional and Non-Jurisdictional Matters
37(1)
Errors of Law
38(21)
Introduction
38(1)
Jurisdictional and Non-Jurisdictional Errors of Law
39(1)
The Anisminic Decision
40(7)
The General Principle: Errors of Law as Jurisdictional Errors
47(3)
Exceptions to the General Principle
50(9)
Applying Statutory Criteria to the Facts
59(12)
Supervision of the Fact-Finding Process
71(2)
Subjective Jurisdictional Criteria
73(2)
Non-Compliance with Statutory Requirements
75(2)
Concluding Remarks
77(2)
Further Resources
78(1)
The Status of Unlawful Administrative Action
Void or Voidable?
79(6)
The Practical Argument
79(2)
The Theoretical Argument
81(4)
The Nature of Voidness
85(8)
The Presumption of Validity
85(6)
The Principle of Legal Relativity
91(2)
Managing the Practical Effects of Voidness
93(9)
The `Domino Effect' Problem
93(1)
The Void/Voidable Distinction as a Management Technique
94(2)
Judicial Discretion
96(1)
The Theory of the Second Actor
97(4)
Partial Invalidity
101(1)
Collateral Challenge
102(7)
Voidness and Collateral Challenge
102(1)
The Importance of Collateral Challenge
103(3)
The Limits of Collateral Challenge
106(3)
Concluding Remarks
109(1)
Further Resources
109(1)
Discretionary Power: An Introduction
What is Discretionary Power?
110(2)
Discretion and the Administrative State
112(3)
Further Resources
114(1)
The Scope of Public Law Principles
Introduction
115(1)
Statutory Powers
115(1)
Prerogative Powers
116(14)
The Nature of Prerogative Power
116(1)
The Amenability of the Prerogative to Judicial Review
117(4)
From Form to Substance: Justiciability as the Limiting Factor
121(9)
De Facto Powers
130(14)
The Datafin Case
130(3)
Defining the Scope of Judicial Review
133(1)
The Limits of Review and its Underlying Rationale
134(4)
Contractual Arrangements
138(4)
Public Law and Private Law: Should There Be a Divide?
142(2)
Section 6 of the Human Rights Act 1998
144(9)
Concluding Remarks
153(1)
Further Resources
153(1)
Retention of Discretion
Introduction
154(1)
Delegation of Discretionary Power
154(12)
A Presumption Against Delegation
154(2)
Conflicting Policies
156(1)
The Nature of Delegation
157(2)
Departmental Decision-Making in Central Government
159(7)
Discretion and Policy
166(7)
Distinguishing Policies and Rules
166(1)
The Legality of Policy-Orientated Decision-Making
167(4)
Discretion and Policy: The Underlying Issues
171(2)
Discretionary Power and Contractual Arrangements
173(3)
Concluding Remarks
176(1)
Further Resources
176(1)
Legitimate Expectations
Lawfully Created Expectations
177(24)
Why Protect Legitimate Expectations?
177(2)
Two Variables: Legitimacy and Protection
179(2)
Legitimacy: What is the Claimant Entitled to Expect?
181(11)
Procedural Protection
192(2)
Substantive Protection
194(6)
Revocability of Lawful Administrative Decisions
200(1)
Unlawfully Created Expectations
201(19)
Introduction
201(1)
Fairness to the Individual
202(1)
Constitutionality and the Public Interest
203(3)
A New Approach
206(3)
Representations Issued by Unauthorized Officials
209(4)
Representations Concerning Action which is Ultra Vires the Agency
213(7)
Concluding Remarks
220(1)
Further Resources
220(1)
Abuse of Discretion I
Introduction
221(2)
Loyalty to the Statutory Scheme: The Propriety of Purpose Doctrine
223(6)
Overlapping Principles?
223(1)
Express and Implied Purposes
223(2)
The Purpose Doctrine and the Intensity of Review
225(3)
Multiple Purposes
228(1)
Inputs into the Decision-Making Process: The Relevancy Doctrine
229(12)
Introduction
229(1)
General Principles
230(4)
Relevancy, Judicial Intervention, and Executive Autonomy
234(7)
Concluding Remarks
241(2)
Further Resources
242(1)
Abuse of Discretion II
Introduction
243(1)
Reasonableness and Rationality
244(12)
The Wednesbury and GCHQ Cases
244(5)
Deference and the Variable Standard of Review
249(7)
Proportionality as a Principle of Review
256(35)
The Methodology of Wednesbury Review
256(3)
Wednesbury, Proportionality, and the Intensity of Review
259(5)
Towards Proportionality
264(3)
The Daly Case and the Human Rights Act
267(5)
Deference
272(7)
Democratic and Institutional Considerations
279(9)
Substantive Review: the Future
288(3)
Concluding Remarks
291(1)
Further Resources
291(1)
The Rule Against Bias
The Rule: Its Scope and Rationale
292(3)
Automatic Disqualification
295(14)
Financial Interests
295(8)
Beyond Financial Interests: Pinochet
303(6)
The Apprehension of Bias
309(10)
Suspicion, Likelihood, Danger: Competing Tests
309(4)
Beyond Gough: The Fair-Minded and Informed Observer
313(6)
Bias, Policy, and Politics
319(4)
Article 6
323(17)
Introduction: Article 6 in an Administrative Context
323(4)
When Does Article 6(1) Apply to Administrative Decision-Making?
327(4)
What Does Article 6(1) Require in the Administrative Sphere?
331(9)
Concluding Remarks
340(2)
Further Resources
341(1)
Procedural Fairness
The Idea of Procedural Fairness
342(4)
The Province of Procedural Fairness
346(16)
A Question of Function or of Impact?
346(9)
Natural Justice and Acting Fairly
355(3)
Legitimate Expectations of Fair Treatment
358(1)
Article 6: The Scope of the Right to a Fair and Public Hearing
358(1)
The Limits of Procedural Fairness
359(3)
The Nature of Procedural Fairness
362(29)
Fairness: A Context-Sensitive Phenomenon
362(6)
The Right to Know the Opposing Case
368(6)
Hearings: Cross-Examination, Legal Representation, and Evidence
374(13)
Appeals
387(4)
Concluding Remarks
391(1)
Further Resources
391(1)
Giving Reasons For Decisions
Reasons, Notice, and Rationality
392(1)
Why Require Reasons?
393(5)
The Virtues of Reason-Giving
393(3)
A General Duty to Give Reasons?
396(2)
The Duty to Give Reasons at Common Law
398(9)
The Emergence of a Common Law Duty to Give Reasons
398(2)
Reasons, Appeal, and Review
400(2)
A `Unitary' Test
402(5)
Reason-Giving and Legitimate Expectation
407(1)
Statutory and Other Duties to Give Reasons
407(4)
Introduction
407(1)
The Freedom of Information Act 2000
408(2)
Article 6 ECHR
410(1)
Implications of the Duty to Give Reasons
411(2)
Concluding Remarks
413(1)
Further Resources
413(1)
Remedies
Introduction
414(1)
Injunctions
415(12)
The Role of Injunctions in Public Law
415(1)
The Availability of Interim Injunctions
416(3)
Injunctions and the Crown
419(8)
Declarations
427(3)
The Role of Declarations in Public Law
427(1)
Interim Declarations
428(2)
Relator Proceedings
430(4)
Prerogative Remedies
434(4)
Quashing Orders
434(2)
Prohibiting Orders
436(1)
Mandatory Orders
437(1)
Concluding Remarks
438(1)
Further Resources
438(1)
The Judicial Review Procedure
Introduction
439(1)
What is the Judicial Review Procedure?
440(5)
The Origins of Today's Judicial Review Procedure
440(2)
The Nature of the Judicial Review Procedure
442(3)
When Must the Judicial Review Procedure be Used?
445(25)
Procedural Exclusivity
445(10)
Waiver
455(1)
Resolution of Factual Disputes
456(1)
Defensive Use of Public Law Arguments
456(1)
Private Law Rights Dependent upon Public Law
457(4)
Private Law Rights Affected by Public Law
461(4)
Procedural Exclusivity and the Civil Procedure Rules
465(1)
A More Substantive Approach
465(4)
Transfer into Part 54
469(1)
Concluding Remarks
470(1)
Further Resources
470(1)
Restriction of Remedies
Introduction
471(1)
Permission
472(4)
The Pre-Action Protocol
472(1)
Judicial Review: A Two-Stage Process
472(1)
Reform of the Permission Stage
473(1)
The Operation of the Permission Stage
474(2)
Exhaustion of Alternative Remedies
476(3)
The Principle and its Rationale
476(2)
Exceptions to the General Principle
478(1)
Time Limits
479(9)
Introduction
479(2)
Interpreting the Rules
481(2)
A Three-Stage Analysis
483(5)
Prematurity and Ripeness
488(9)
Introduction
488(1)
Preliminary and Interlocutory Decisions
489(2)
Advice, Guidance, Recommendations, and Views
491(3)
Hypothetical Issues and Advisory Declarations
494(3)
Exclusion of Judicial Review
497(16)
Introduction
497(1)
Finality Clauses
498(1)
`No Certiorari' and `as if Enacted' Clauses
499(1)
`Shall not be Questioned' Clauses
500(4)
Further Issues
504(1)
Statutory Review
505(6)
Statutory Remedies and Anisminic
511(1)
Review of Decisions by the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal
512(1)
Standing
513(30)
Introduction
513(3)
The Law Prior to the National Federation Case
516(1)
The National Federation Case
517(14)
Representative Standing
531(6)
The Foundations of the Law of Standing
537(3)
Standing in Human Rights Cases
540(3)
Concluding Remarks
543(2)
Further Resources
543(2)
Liability of Public Authorities and Crown Proceedings
General Matters
545(2)
Introduction
545(1)
Relationship with Judicial Review
545(1)
The Meaning of `the Crown' in this Context
546(1)
Tort
547(35)
Liability in Tort Generally
547(1)
The Crown's Position in Tort
547(1)
Breach of Statutory Duty
548(1)
The Search for Legislative Intention
548(3)
The Level of Liability
551(1)
Relationship with Ultra Vires
552(1)
Breach of European Community Law Obligations by the State
552(2)
The Human Rights Act 1998: Introduction
554(1)
The Statutory Provisions
555(1)
Is Fault Required?
556(1)
`Just Satisfaction'
556(2)
Procedural Matters
558(1)
Misfeasance in Public Office
558(5)
Causation and Damage
563(1)
The Tort of Negligence: Introduction
563(1)
Development of the Law: The Rise and Fall of Ultra Vires
564(6)
Particular Examples from the Administrative Law Sphere
570(1)
The Question of Liability for Omissions
571(5)
When can there be Liability?
576(2)
Nuisance, Rylands v. Fletcher, and Statutory Authority
578(3)
Other Compensation Possibilities
581(1)
Public Authorities and Other Aspects of the Tort of Nuisance and Rylands v. Fletcher
581(1)
Contract
582(22)
Introduction
582(1)
(Basic) Contractual Capacity
583(2)
Freedom to Contract
585(2)
Is Parliamentary Appropriation of Funds Necessary?
587(4)
The Non-Fettering Rule
591(4)
Agency and Public Authorities' Contracts
595(2)
The Law of Crown Service
597(2)
Is there a Contract of Employment?
599(4)
Can a Claim in Judicial Review be Brought?
603(1)
Restitution
604(6)
Introduction
604(1)
The `Woolwich Principle'
605(1)
The Scope of the `Woolwich Principle'
606(2)
Relationship with Statute
608(1)
Defences
608(1)
Claims by a Public Body
609(1)
Procedural Matters
609(1)
A Public Law or a Private Law Right?
610(1)
Remedies, Procedure, and Public Interest Immunity
610(23)
Remedies and Procedure in General
610(2)
Exemplary (or Punitive) Damages
612(2)
Public Interest Immunity
614(4)
Crown Privilege Becomes Public Interest Immunity
618(1)
Evolution of the Doctrine
619(9)
The Questions of who should Raise the Claim and of Waiver
628(4)
Article 6 ECHR, the HRA, and Public Interest Immunity
632(1)
Further Resources
632(1)
Delegated Legislation
Introduction
633(7)
General Matters
633(1)
Enabling Provisions
634(1)
The Nature of Delegated Powers
635(1)
The Extent of Delegated Powers
636(2)
Legislative and Administrative Measures
638(2)
The Making of Delegated Legislation
640(9)
Publication
640(2)
Consultation
642(6)
The Role of Parliament
648(1)
Parliamentary Scrutiny
649(5)
The Conferral of Administrative Rule-Making Powers
649(1)
The Exercise of Administrative Rule-Making Powers
650(1)
Technical Scrutiny
650(1)
Policy Scrutiny
651(2)
EU Legislation
653(1)
Regulatory Reform Orders
654(1)
Judicial Scrutiny
654(7)
Introduction
654(1)
Compatibility with Primary Legislation
655(1)
General Principles of Judicial Review
656(2)
Wider Constitutional Principles and Human Rights
658(3)
Concluding Remarks
661(1)
Further Resources
661(1)
Inquiries
Introduction
662(2)
Background to the Modern Law
664(1)
Statutory Inquiries Today
665(14)
General
665(2)
The Right to Know the Opposing Case
667(3)
Participation and Procedure
670(4)
Procedure Following the Inquiry
674(5)
Ad Hoc Inquiries
679(9)
Introduction
679(3)
The Role of Judges in Public Inquiries
682(2)
Questions of Procedure
684(4)
Concluding Remarks
688(1)
Further Resources
688(1)
Statutory Tribunals
Introduction
689(5)
The Growth of Tribunals
689(1)
Are Tribunals a Desirable Feature of the Administrative System?
689(2)
The Franks Report
691(3)
The Independence of Tribunals
694(2)
Tribunals and Government
694(1)
Judicial Leadership of Tribunals
695(1)
Appointment to Tribunals
696(1)
Procedure in Tribunals
696(11)
Introduction
696(1)
Formality, Representation, and the Style of Tribunal Proceedings
697(4)
Knowledge of Rights and Grounds of Appeal
701(1)
Knowledge of the Case to be Met
702(1)
Reasons for Tribunals' Decisions
702(5)
Appeals and the System of Tribunals
707(4)
Towards a Tribunals System
707(1)
Appeal From and Review of First-Tier Tribunals' Decisions
708(3)
The Supervision and Accountability of Tribunals
711(2)
Concluding Remarks
713(2)
Further Resources
714(1)
Ombudsmen
Introduction
715(6)
Ombudsmen in the UK
715(1)
The Need for and Role of Ombudsmen
716(3)
Ombudsmen in a Changing Administrative Landscape
719(2)
Bodies Subject to Investigation
721(1)
Matters Subject to Investigation
722(7)
`Maladministration'
723(3)
Other Modes of Redress
726(1)
Excluded Matters
726(2)
Discretion to Investigate
728(1)
The Conduct of Investigations
729(8)
Own-Initiative Investigations
732(1)
The MP Filter
733(2)
Co-operation with the Ombudsman
735(1)
Securing Redress
736(1)
Problems and Reform
737(3)
The Ombudsmen's Concerns
737(1)
Institutional Reform
737(2)
Throughput
739(1)
Concluding Remarks
740(3)
Further Resources
741(2)
Appendix 743(10)
Index 753

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