9781405118989

Biogeography: An Ecological and Evolutionary Approach, 7th Edition

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781405118989

  • ISBN10:

    1405118989

  • Edition: 7th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-02-01
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

The latest edition of this highly successful and popular textbook has been completely revised and updated to include the latest developments in biogeography. It offers excellent insight into the multi-disciplinary nature of biogeography, providing the student with a sound historical base, up-to-date factual content and a clear explanation of current controversies. New chapter on molecular evidence for the interpretation of patterns of biogeography New section on the biogeography of parasitic diseases Strong use of references providing a platform for advanced students to follow further debate in the current literature Balanced treatment of continental biogeography, island biogeography and marine biogeography

Author Biography

Barry Cox was formerly head of Biological Sciences at King’s College London. He was originally a vertebrate palaeontologist, but soon became also interested in the patterns of distribution of life in the past. He has published extensively on the relations between fossil distributions and plate tectonics, how and when the mammals dispersed across the planet, competing theories on how to interpret past patterns, and the basic patterns of life today at the worldwide level.


Peter Moore is a Reader in Ecology at King’s College London. He first trained as a botanist/biochemist, later turning to palaeoecology and vegetation history and, ultimately, wider ecological issues including global environmental change. He retains a particular interest in wetlands.

Table of Contents

Preface x
Introduction to biogeography
1(14)
Order of chapters
11(1)
Further reading
12(1)
References
13(2)
A history of biogeography
15(30)
Lessons from the past
15(3)
Ecological versus historical biogeography, and plants versus animals
18(1)
Biogeography and Creation
19(2)
Distribution of life today
21(2)
Evolution--a flawed and dangerous idea!
23(1)
Enter Darwin
24(1)
World maps: the biogeographical regions of plants and animals
25(3)
Getting around the world
28(3)
The origins of modern historical biogeography
31(5)
The development of ecological biogeography
36(1)
Living together
37(2)
Marine biogeography
39(2)
Island biogeography
41(2)
Summary
43(1)
Further reading
43(1)
References
43(2)
Patterns of biodiversity
45(28)
How many species are there?
46(6)
Gradients of diversity
52(8)
Biodiversity hotspots
60(2)
Diversity in time
62(6)
Marine biodiversity
68(1)
Dynamic biodiversity
68(2)
Summary
70(1)
Further reading
70(1)
References
70(3)
Patterns of distribution
73(46)
Limits of distribution
74(1)
Overcoming the barriers
75(2)
A successful family: the daisies (Asteraceae)
77(3)
Patterns of dragonflies
80(3)
Magnolias: evolutionary relicts
83(2)
Climatic relicts
85(4)
Endemic organisms
89(1)
Physical limitations
90(1)
Environmental gradients
91(5)
Interaction of factors
96(3)
Species interaction
99(2)
Invasion
101(6)
Reducing competition
107(3)
Migration
110(2)
Predators and prey
112(4)
Summary
116(1)
Further reading
116(1)
References
116(3)
Communities and ecosystems
119(24)
The community
120(2)
The ecosystem
122(3)
Ecosystems and biodiversity
125(3)
Biotic assemblages on a global scale
128(4)
Patterns of climate
132(6)
Modelling biomes and climate
138(2)
Biomes in a changing world
140(1)
Summary
141(1)
Further reading
141(1)
References
142(1)
The source of novelty
143(22)
Natural selection
144(1)
Darwin's explanation and Darwin's finches
145(4)
Controlling forces within the organism
149(1)
From populations to species
150(2)
Polyploids
152(1)
Barriers to interbreeding
153(2)
Competition for life
155(1)
The `theory' of natural selection
156(2)
Controversies and evolutionary theory
158(2)
Evolution and the human race(s)
160(2)
Summary
162(1)
Further reading
162(1)
References
162(3)
Life, death and evolution on islands
165(36)
Types of island
166(2)
Getting there: problems of access
168(2)
Dying there: problems of survival
170(2)
Integrating the data: the Theory of Island Biogeography
172(2)
Second thoughts about the Theory
174(2)
The Theory of Island Biogeography and the design of nature reserves
176(3)
Starting afresh: the story of Rakata
179(7)
The coastal environment
180(1)
Life inland
181(5)
Evolving there: opportunities for adaptive radiation
186(4)
The Hawaiian Islands
190(7)
Mechanisms of arrival
192(1)
Evolutionary radiations within the Hawaiian Islands
193(4)
Summary
197(1)
Further reading
197(1)
References
197(4)
Living in the past
201(24)
Plate tectonics
202(3)
Evidence for past geographies
205(1)
Early land life on the moving continents
206(3)
One world-for a while
209(5)
Rise of the flowering plants
214(2)
Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic changes in geography, ocean currents and climate
216(3)
Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic floral changes
219(3)
Summary
222(1)
Further reading
222(1)
References
222(3)
The geography of life today
225(36)
Mammals: the final patterns
227(6)
The distribution of flowering plants today
233(2)
Mammalian versus flowering plant geography: comparisons and contrasts
235(2)
The Old World tropics: Africa, India and South-East Asia
237(6)
Africa
238(2)
The Cape flora
240(1)
Madagascar
241(1)
India and South-East Asia
242(1)
Australia
243(2)
New Zealand
245(2)
The West Indies
247(4)
South America
251(4)
Late Cretaceous/Early Cenozoic
251(1)
Later in the Cenozoic
251(1)
Late Cenozoic/Pleistocene
252(3)
The Northern Hemisphere: Holarctic mammals and Boreal plants
255(3)
Summary
258(1)
Further reading
258(1)
References
258(3)
Ice and change
261(36)
Climatic wiggles
262(2)
Interglacials and interstadials
264(2)
Biological changes in the Pleistocene
266(2)
The last glacial
268(6)
Causes of glaciation
274(5)
The current interglacial: a false start
279(3)
Forests on the move
282(5)
The dry lands
287(1)
Changing sea levels
288(2)
Time of warmth
290(1)
Climatic cooling
291(2)
Recorded history
293(1)
Summary
294(1)
Further reading
294(1)
References
295(2)
Transforming the planet
297(22)
The emergence of humans
297(6)
Modern humans and the megafaunal extinctions
303(1)
Domestication and agriculture
304(7)
The biogeography of human parasitic diseases
311(3)
Environmental impact of early human cultures
314(1)
Summary
315(1)
Further reading
316(1)
References
316(3)
Drawing lines in the water
319(34)
Zones in the ocean and upon the sea floor
323(2)
Basic biogeography of the seas
325(1)
The open-sea realm
326(11)
Dynamics of the ocean basins
326(3)
Patterns of life in the ocean waters: biomes and provinces within the oceans
329(4)
Patterns of life on the ocean floor
333(3)
Biogeography of hydrothermal vent faunas
336(1)
The shallow-sea realm
337(13)
Faunal breaks within the shelf faunas
339(2)
Coastal faunas of islands
341(1)
Trans-oceanic links and barriers between shelf faunas
341(2)
Latitudinal patterns in the shelf faunas
343(1)
Coral reefs
344(6)
Summary
350(1)
Further reading
350(1)
References
350(3)
Interpreting the past: I. Molecular and isotopic biogeography
353(18)
The molecules of life
354(2)
DNA, RNA, enzymes and phylogeny
356(2)
The molecular clock
358(1)
Molecular evolution and bird biogeography
359(3)
Human biogeography and molecular methods
362(1)
Population crashes, bottlenecks and catastrophes
363(2)
Isotopes in biogeography
365(2)
Isotopes in biogeochemical cycles
367(1)
New horizons
368(1)
Summary
369(1)
Further reading
369(1)
References
369(2)
Interpreting the past: II. Principles and practice
371(20)
The great divide: dispersal versus vicariance
371(3)
Centres of dispersal and centres of origin
374(1)
Current methods of biogeographical analysis
374(2)
Phylogenetic biogeography
376(1)
Phylogeography
377(2)
Cladistic biogeography
379(1)
Generalized tracks
380(1)
Parsimony analysis of endemicity
381(1)
Endemicity and Pleistocene problems
382(3)
The `New Zealand school' of panbiogeography
385(2)
Palaeogeography
387(1)
Summary
388(1)
Further reading
388(1)
References
389(2)
Foretelling the future
391(26)
The human population
392(3)
The changing climate
395(4)
Nitrogen and sulphur overload
399(2)
Other pollutants
401(1)
Biogeographical consequences of global change
402(4)
Population declines and extinctions
406(3)
Changing communities and biomes
409(1)
Where do we go from here?
410(3)
Summary
413(1)
Further reading
413(1)
References
413(4)
Index 417

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