9783540209416

Cell Adhesion

by ; ; ; ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9783540209416

  • ISBN10:

    3540209417

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2004-09-01
  • Publisher: Springer Verlag

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

This book provides an overview of the main topics of current cell adhesion research including structural analyses of cell adhesion molecules and studies to their functional role in vitro and in vivo. The present volume focuses on the four major families of cell-adhesion receptors, i.e. the cadherins, the integrins, the Ig-superfamily and the selectin-based adhesion system which are discussed in detail by numerous experts in the field.

Table of Contents

Part I. Cadherins
Cadherin Adhesion: Mechanisms and Molecular Interactions
3(20)
T.D. Perez
W.J. Nelson
Introduction
3(3)
Ca++ and Cadherin Adhesion
6(1)
Cadherin Adhesion Structure: Trans-Dimer
7(8)
Early Studies
7(4)
Recent Studies, Evolving Models
11(2)
Further Functional Studies of EC Domains in Adhesion
13(2)
Cadherin Adhesion Structure: Cis-Dimer
15(8)
References
19(4)
Structural Aspects of Adherens Junctions and Desmosomes
23(30)
H.-J. Choi
W.I. Weis
Overview
24(1)
Cadherins
25(2)
Classical Cadherin Cytoplasmic Domain
25(1)
Desmosomal Cadherins
26(1)
β-Catenin and Plakoglobin
27(10)
Structure of the β-Catenin Arm Repeat Domain and Implications for Other Arm Proteins
28(2)
The β-Catenin/E-Cadherin Complex
30(3)
Role of Non-arm Repeat Regions
33(1)
Desmosomal Cadherin--Plakoglobin Interactions
34(3)
α-Catenin
37(7)
α-Catenin Homodimerization and β-Catenin Binding Region
37(3)
α-Catenin M Region
40(2)
Actin Binding by α-Catenin
42(1)
Regulation of α-Catenin Interactions
43(1)
Intermediate Filament Binding by Desmoplakin
44(9)
References
46(7)
Cadherins in Development
53(16)
H. Semb
Introduction
53(2)
Cell Adhesion
55(2)
Cell and Tissue Polarity
57(1)
Cell Sorting
58(1)
Cell Migration
59(2)
Cell Survival
61(1)
Tube Formation
62(2)
Future
64(5)
References
65(4)
Cadherins in Cancer
69(36)
K. Strumane
G. Berx
F. Van Roy
E-Cadherin Function in Cancer Cells
70(3)
E-Cadherin Expression in Human Carcinomas
73(2)
Genetic Alterations of the E-Cadherin Gene in Cancer
75(2)
Transcriptional Downregulation of E-Cadherin
77(4)
E-Cadherin Gene Silencing by Promoter Hypermethylation
78(1)
Transacting Regulators
79(2)
Post-translational E-Cadherin Inactivation
81(2)
Tyrosine Phosphorylation
81(1)
E-Cadherin Protein Truncations
82(1)
Cell Surface Proteoglycans and Mucin-Like Glycoproteins
82(1)
Other Cadherins in Cancer
83(2)
Upregulation of E-Cadherin and Tumor Therapy
85(20)
References
86(19)
In Vivo Functions of Catenins
105(32)
T. Brabletz
The E-Cadherin/Catenin Complex
106(1)
β-Catenin
107(16)
The Wnt/Wingless Pathway
109(1)
Physiological Roles of β-Catenin and Wnt Signaling: Embryonic Development and Adult Tissue Homeostasis
109(2)
Roles of β-Catenin in Disease
111(1)
β-Catenin and Cancer
111(1)
Colorectal Cancer
112(9)
Other Cancers Associated with β-Catenin or Wnt Pathway Components
121(1)
Other Diseases Associated with β-Catenin
122(1)
Neurodegenerative Diseases
122(1)
Therapeutical Options
122(1)
Physiological and Pathological Roles of Other Catenins
123(4)
α-Catenin
123(1)
γ-Catenin
124(2)
p120 Catenin
126(1)
Conclusions
127(10)
References
128(9)
The Molecular Composition and Function of Desmosomes
137(60)
L.M. Godsel
S. Getsios
A.C. Huen
K.J. Green
Desmosome Ultrastructure, Tissue Distribution, and Composition
138(3)
The Desmosomal Cadherins
141(5)
Armadillo Proteins of the Desmosome
146(4)
Plakoglobin
146(2)
Plakophilins
148(1)
p0071 (Plakophilin 4)
149(1)
Plakins
150(5)
Desmoplakin
151(2)
Plectin
153(1)
Envoplakin and Periplakin
154(1)
Other Desmosome Proteins
155(1)
Diseases Involving Desmosomes
156(7)
Autoimmune and Infectious Disease
156(3)
Pemphigus Vulgaris and Pemphigus Foliaceus
159(1)
Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome
160(1)
Paraneoplastic Pemphigus
160(1)
Genetic Diseases
161(1)
Mutations in the Desmosomal Cadherins
161(1)
Involvement of Armadillo Proteins in Genetic Disease
162(1)
Mutations in Desmoplakin
162(1)
Animal Models Involving Desmosomes
163(7)
Desmosomal Cadherin Models
166(2)
Armadillo Protein Models
168(1)
Desmoplakin Models
169(1)
Regulation of Desmosomes
170(7)
Desmosome Assembly
171(2)
Dependence of Desmosomes on Adherens Junction Formation
173(1)
Transcriptional and Post-translational Mechanisms for Modulating Desmosome Assembly State
174(1)
The Role of Desmosome Components in Signaling and Transcriptional Regulation
175(2)
Future Directions and Concluding Remarks
177(20)
References
178(19)
Part II. Integrins and Extracellular Matrix
Regulation of Signal Transduction by Integrins
197(20)
Y. Miyamoto
P. Reddig
R.L. Juliano
Overview
197(1)
Direct Signaling by Integrins
198(7)
Focal Adhesion Kinase and Other Focal Contact Proteins
198(3)
Direct Activation of MAP Kinase Cascades by Integrins
201(1)
Integrins and Rho GTPases
202(3)
Integrin Regulation of RTK Signaling Cascades
205(4)
Integrin Regulation of Signaling by GPCRs
209(1)
Summary
210(7)
References
210(7)
Integrins and Extracellular Matrix in Animal Models
217(26)
U. Muller
Introduction
218(4)
Integrin--ECM Interactions and Early Embryonic Development
222(1)
Integrin--ECM Interactions During Mesoderm Formation and in the Heart
223(1)
Integrin--ECM Interactions During Epithelial Tubulogenesis
224(1)
Integrin--ECM Interactions and Angiogenesis
225(1)
Integrin--ECM Interactions During Skin Development
226(1)
Integrin--ECM Interactions in Skeletal Development
227(1)
Integrins, ECM Molecules, and Inner Ear Development
227(1)
Integrin--ECM Interactions in Skeletal Muscle Development
228(2)
Integrin--ECM Interactions in Peripheral Nerve and at the Neuromuscular Junction
230(2)
Integrin--ECM Interactions in the CNS
232(2)
Summary
234(9)
References
234(9)
Hemidesmosomes: Molecular Organization and Their Importance for Cell Adhesion and Disease
243(40)
J. Koster
L. Borradori
A. Sonnenberg
Hemidesmosomes
245(8)
General Introduction
245(1)
The α6β4 Integrin
246(4)
BP180
250(1)
CD151
251(1)
Keratins
252(1)
Laminins
252(1)
Plakins
253(9)
General Introduction
253(2)
Plectin
255(3)
BP230
258(1)
Desmoplakin
259(1)
Microtubule--Actin Cross-Linking Factor
260(1)
Envoplakin
260(1)
Periplakin
261(1)
Epiplakin
261(1)
Molecular Interactions Involved in Hemidesmosome Assembly
262(3)
The Role of β4 in HD Assembly
262(1)
The Role of BP180 in HD Assembly
263(1)
The Linkage of Keratins to Hemidesmosomes
264(1)
A Hierarchical Interaction Model for the Assembly of HDs
265(1)
General Conclusions and Future Perspectives
266(17)
References
267(16)
Part III. Immunoglobulin Superfamily
CEA-Related CAMs
283(60)
A.K. Horst
C. Wagener
Introduction
284(3)
Genomic Organization and Regulation of Transcription
287(1)
Gene Structure
287(1)
Regulation of Transcription
288(1)
Three-Dimensional Structure
288(3)
Expression Pattern
291(8)
Expression of CEACAMs in Healthy Adult Tissues
291(3)
Expression of CEACAMs in Healthy Adult Colon
294(1)
Expression of CEACAMs During Gestation and Embryonic Development
295(1)
Dysregulation of the Expression of CEACAMs in Human Tumors
296(3)
Biological Functions of CEACAMs
299(23)
CEACAMs Are Cellular Adhesion Molecules
299(2)
CEACAMs Display Versatile Signal Transduction Properties
301(1)
Mechanisms of Signal Transduction by CEACAM1
301(2)
CEACAM1 Interacts with Components of the Cytoskeleton
303(1)
CEACAM1 Acts as a Tumor Suppressor
304(2)
CEACAM1 Promotes Invasion
306(1)
CEACAM1 Is a Substrate for the Insulin Receptor and Regulates Insulin Clearance
307(2)
CEACAMs Are Modulators of the Innate and Adaptive Immune Response
309(1)
CEACAM1 Is a Positive Regulator of Neutrophil Effector Function
309(2)
CEACAM1 Regulates T and B Lymphocyte Function
311(1)
CEACAM1 Is a Novel Co-inhibitory Receptor on Human Natural Killer Cells
312(1)
CEACAMs Are Receptors for Microbes and Viruses
313(1)
CEACAMs Are Receptors for Salmonellae and Escherichia coli
313(1)
CEACAMs Are Receptors for Neisseria
314(2)
CEACAMs Are Receptors for Haemophilus Influenzae
316(1)
CEACAMs Are Receptors for Murine Hepatitis Virus
317(2)
CEACAM1 Modulates Angiogenesis
319(1)
CEACAM1 Is an Angiogenic Growth Factor
319(2)
CEACAM1 Induces Secretion of Angiostatic Factors in CEACAM1-Transfected Prostate Carcinoma Cells
321(1)
Perspectives
322(21)
References
324(19)
Roles of Nectins in Cell Adhesion, Signaling and Polarization
343(30)
K. Irie
K. Shimizu
T. Sakisaka
W. Ikeda
Y. Takai
Introduction
345(2)
General Properties of Nectins as CAMs
347(3)
Molecular Structures of Nectins
347(1)
Cell--Cell Adhesion Activity of Nectins
348(1)
Tissue Distribution and Subcellular Localization of Nectins
349(1)
Roles of Nectins in Cell--Cell Adhesion
350(9)
Cooperative Roles of Nectins with Cadherins
350(1)
Role of Nectins in Organization of AJs and TJs
350(2)
Role of Nectins in Formation of Synapses
352(2)
Association Mechanisms of Nectins, Cadherins, and TJ Components
354(1)
Cadherin-Independent Roles of Nectins
355(1)
Possible Roles of Nectins in Axonal Pathfinding
355(2)
Role of Nectins in Organization of Sertoli Cell--Spermatid Junctions
357(2)
Association of Nectins with the Actin Cytoskeleton
359(1)
Role of Nectins in Cell Signaling
359(2)
Activation of Cdc42 and Rac by Nectins
359(2)
Activation of JNK by Nectins
361(1)
Role of Nectins in Cell Polarization
361(3)
Nectins as Viral Receptors
364(1)
Conclusions and Perspectives
365(8)
References
366(7)
Ig Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in the Brain
373(32)
E.T. Stoeckli
Introduction
374(2)
The Role of IgSF CAMs in Axon Guidance
376(6)
IgSF CAMs, the Vanguard of Axon Guidance Cues
376(1)
Axon Guidance Across the Midline of the Nervous System
377(3)
Midline Contact Elicits a Switch in Growth Cones' Response from Attraction to Repulsion
380(1)
The Interaction Between Dcc and Unc-5 Induces a Switch from Short- to Long-Range Effects
381(1)
IgSF CAMs Play a Role in Subpopulation-Specific Guidance of Sensory Afferents
381(1)
IgSF CAMs in Cell Migration
382(2)
IgSF CAMs in Cerebellar Development
384(1)
IgSF CAMS in Synaptogenesis
385(1)
IgSF CAMs in Synaptic Maintenance and Plasticity
386(1)
Intracellular Signaling Associated with IgSF CAMs
387(5)
Intracellular Signaling Associated with Transmembrane IgSF CAMs
387(1)
Intracellular Signaling Associated with Glycosylphosphatidyl-Inositol Anchored IgSF CAMs
388(1)
Conformational Changes Are Sufficient to Induce a Switch in Intracellular Signaling Associated with IgSF CAMs
389(1)
Changes in Signaling by Removal of IgSF CAMs from the Membrane
389(2)
Silencing of IgSF CAM-Derived Signals
391(1)
Outlook
392(13)
References
392(13)
Part IV. Physiology and Pathology of Cell Adhesion
Adhesion Mechanisms of Endothelial Cells
405(32)
P.F. Bradfield
B.A. Imhof
Immune Surveillance and Homeostasis: The Role of the Endothelium
406(1)
Cell Adhesion Molecules
406(2)
Targeting Leukocyte Adhesion
408(5)
Primary Adhesion
409(1)
Activation
410(1)
Secondary Adhesion
410(1)
Diapedesis
410(3)
Regulation of Cell Trafficking by Distinct Populations of Endothelial Cells
413(3)
Recirculation of Leukocytes: Deciphering the Role of the Lymphatic Endothelium
415(1)
Inflammation and Wound Healing: Synergy Between the Endothelium and the Extra-vasculature
416(2)
Cell Adhesion Molecules, the Players in Mediating Endothelial Function
418(19)
Selectins and Their Ligands
418(1)
Selectins
418(1)
Selectin Ligands: Sialomucins and Carbohydrate Moieties
419(1)
Function and Patterns of Expression
420(1)
Integrins
421(3)
The Immunoglobulin Superfamily
424(1)
ICAM and VCAM
425(1)
Mucosal Adressin Cell Adhesion Molecule 1
426(1)
CD31
426(1)
Junctional Adhesion Molecules
427(1)
CD99
428(1)
CD44
428(1)
Vascular Adhesion Protein-1
429(1)
References
429(8)
Pharmacology of Platelet Adhesion and Aggregation
437(36)
B. Nieswandt
S. Offermanns
Introduction
438(1)
Adhesion of Platelets to the Extracellular Matrix
439(10)
von Willebrand Factor
440(1)
Glycoprotein Ib-V-IX
441(1)
Collagen
442(1)
Glycoprotein VI
443(2)
Integrin α2β1
445(2)
Integrins α5β1/α6β1
447(1)
Integrin αIIbβ3 (GPIIb/IIIa)
447(2)
Platelet Aggregation
449(6)
Integrin αIIbβ3 in Aggregation
449(1)
Inside-Out Activation
450(4)
Outside-In Activation
454(1)
Stabilization of Platelet Aggregates
454(1)
Platelet-Endothelial Cell Interaction
455(1)
Pharmacological Strategies to Interfere with Platelet Adhesive Functions
456(5)
Inhibition of Platelet Adhesion
456(2)
Inhibition of Integrin αIIbβ3 (GPIIb/IIIa) Activation
458(1)
Inhibition of TXA2 Production or Action
458(1)
Inhibition of ADP-Dependent Platelet Activation
459(1)
Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Antagonists
460(1)
Conclusions
461(12)
References
462(11)
Subject Index 473

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