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9789004142039

Collecting The Self

by
  • ISBN13:

    9789004142039

  • ISBN10:

    9004142037

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2004-12-31
  • Publisher: Brill Academic Pub
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Summary

Chinese strange tale collections contain short stories about ghosts and animal spirits, supra-human heroes and freaks, exotic lands and haunted homes, earthquake and floods, and other perceived anomalies to accepted cosmic and social norms. As such, this body of literature is a rich repository of Chinese myths, folklore, and unofficial histories . These collections also reflect Chinese attitudes towards normalcy and strangeness, perceptions of civilization and barbarism, and fantasies about self and other. Inspired in part by Freud s theory of the uncanny, this book explores the emotive subtexts of late imperial strange tale collections to consider what these stories tell us about suppressed cultural anxieties, the construction of gender, and authorial self-identity.

Author Biography

Sing-chen Lydia Chiang is Assistant Professor of Chinese at Tufts University.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements ix
CHAPTER ONE: Introduction: Theorizing Chinese Strange Tale Collections 1(59)
1. Theoretical Foundation
4(3)
2. Methodological Issues
7(2)
3. Thematic Parameters
9(1)
4. Generic Traditions
10(18)
I. Zhiguai
12(5)
II. Zhiren
17(1)
III Chuanqi
18(8)
IV. Xiaoshuo and Baiguan
26(1)
V. Biji and Xiaoshuo
27(1)
5. Historical Context
28(17)
I. Pu Songling and the Kangxi Reign
28(7)
II. Culture and Collecting During the Late Qianlong Reign
35(3)
III. Yuan Mei
38(3)
IV. Ji Yun
41(4)
6. Literary and Artistic Trends
45(6)
7. Case Studies
51(5)
8. Outline of Following Chapters
56(4)
CHAPTER TWO: The Uncanny and Boundaries of the Self in Liaozhai zhiyi 60(67)
1. The Problem
62(6)
2. Textual and Commentary Histories of Liaozhai
68(12)
3. Horror Fiction and the Recursive Structure of Liaozhai zhiyi
80(3)
4. The Uncanny in Liaozhai zhiyi
83(3)
5. The Deconstructed Male Gaze and Ming-Qing Literati Anxiety
86(3)
6. The Recurrent Nightmare
89(8)
7. Horrors Within the Patriarchal Order
97(16)
8. The Haunted Home as the Haunted Mind
113(6)
9. The Grotesque Male Body and Ambiguous Masculine Identity
119(3)
10. The Terrified Exorcist
122(1)
11. Conclusion
123(4)
CHAPTER THREE: Body, Power, and Fantastic Discourse in Liaozhai zhiyi 127(30)
1. Portrait of Pu Songling
127(4)
2. Body and Identity in Liaozhai zhiyi
131(1)
3. The Body in Late Imperial Cultural and Fictional Discourses
132(2)
4. The Confucian Body and Literati Identity in "Jiaonuo"
134(9)
5. The Phallic Woman, the Castrated Man, and the Problem of Normative Gender Construction in "A Woman Warrior'
143(5)
6. Masquerade and Self-Identity in "The Merchant's Son"
148(5)
7. Sign and Meaning in Liaozhai zhiyi
153(4)
CHAPTER FOUR: The Grotesque Body and Literati Identities in Zi buyu 157(40)
1. Forbidden Subjects and the Literati Subject
160(6)
2. The Literati Self and the Shifting Boundaries of Humanhood
166(10)
3. The Sexed Body as Grotesque
176(18)
4. Conclusion
194(3)
CHAPTER FIVE: Creation, Transmission, and the Ghostly Poet in Yuewei caotang 197(47)
1. "Nothing but Self-torture"
197(4)
2. Discourse of a (Ghost)writer
201(16)
3. The Uncanny Other as Self
217(14)
4. Ghostly Origin and the Problem of Originality
231(11)
5. Conclusion
242(2)
EPILOGUE: Theoretical Implications 244(8)
1. The Uncanny in Comparative Perspective
244(2)
2. The Uncanny and Correlative Cosmology
246(3)
3. The Uncanny and Literati Self-Representation
249(3)
APPENDIX: "The Merchant's Son" by Pu Songling 252(7)
Bibliography 259(11)
Index 270

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