9781572301474

Contemporary Intellectual Assessment Theories, Tests, and Issues

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  • ISBN13:

    9781572301474

  • ISBN10:

    1572301473

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1996-10-25
  • Publisher: The Guilford Press
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Summary

In recent years, traditional theories of intelligence and measures of intellectual functioning have come under increased scrutiny by practitioners and researchers seeking a broader understanding of cognitive abilities and personal competence, enhanced diagnostic and treatment utility, and a more culturally sensitive practice. Toward these ends, many new assessment instruments and techniques have been developed and new and revised theories of intelligence have emerged. Bringing professionals up to date with these advances, this unique volume provides a comprehensive conceptual and practical overview of the current state of the art of intellectual assessment. Bridging the gap between applied intelligence testing and the latest in cognitive science, the book covers major theories of intelligence, methods of assessing human cognitive abilities, and issues related to the validity and utility of current test batteries. Contributing authors, who include leading theorists, researchers, and scientist-practitioners, as well as many of the test developers themselves, give special attention to ways in which emerging conceptions of intelligence diverge from traditional paradigms. Taken together, the chapters provide the knowledge needed to effectively use new batteries and to make up-to-date, empirically supported interpretations of older tests.

Author Biography

Dawn P. Flanagan, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor of School Psychology at St. John's University in New York, conducts research on intelligence, psychoeducational and preschool assessment, and professional issues in school psychology. Widely published, she serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment and School Psychology Review and is past president of the New York State Psychological Association's School Division. Judy L. Genshaft, Ph.D., is the Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs at the University at Albany, State University of New York. She has edited two books and written numerous journal articles and book chapters. A licensed psychologist who is on the editorial board of School Psychology Review, she has received several awards and honors for her contributions to the National Association of School Psychologists. Patti L. Harrison, Ph.D., a Professor in the Educational and School Psychology Program and Assistant Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Alabama, has conducted extensive research on intelligence, adaptive behavior, and preschool assessment. Widely published, she is Editor of School Psychology Review, an editorial board member for several journals, a past-chair of the NASP Children's Services Committee, and a past Vice President of Publications, Communications, and Convention Affairs for APA's Division of School Psychology.

Table of Contents

PART I The Origins of Intellectual Assessment 1(48)
The Early History of Intelligence Testing
3(14)
Robert M. Thorndike
Early Influences
3(1)
Enter Alfred Binet
4(1)
Other Contemporary Work
5(2)
Introduction of the IQ
7(2)
Intelligence Testing In World War I and Its Aftermath
9(1)
Debate Over the Nature of Intelligence
10(2)
Midcentury (1925-1975)
12(2)
Entering the Second Century
14(1)
Note
14(1)
References
15(1)
Suggested Further Reading
16(1)
The History of Test Development
17(15)
Richard F. Ittenbach
Irvin G. Esters
Howard Wainer
The History of Test Development
17(1)
Historical and Philosophical Foundations
18(1)
The Practice of Testing
19(8)
Advances in Technology
27(2)
Notes
29(1)
References
29(3)
A History of Intelligence Test Interpretation
32(17)
Randy W. Kamphaus
Martha D. Petoskey
Anna Walters Morgan
A History of Intelligence Test Interpretation
32(1)
Quantification of a General Level---The First Wave
33(3)
Clinical Profile Analysis---The Second Wave
36(3)
Psychometric Profile Analysis---The Third Wave
39(4)
Applying Theory to Intelligence Test Interpretation---The Fourth Wave
43(2)
Conclusion
45(1)
References
46(3)
PART II Contemporary and Emerging Theoretical Perspectives 49(132)
Human Cognitive Capabilities: Gf-Gc Theory
53(39)
John L. Horn
Jennie Noll
Structural Evidence
54(17)
Evidence From Studies of Development and Function
71(11)
Summary
82(1)
Qualifications and Other Points of Perspective
83(1)
Notes
84(1)
References
85(7)
The Triarchic Theory of Intelligence
92(13)
Robert J. Sternberg
Intelligence and the Internal World of the Individual
93(3)
Intelligence and Experience
96(2)
Intelligence and the External World of the Individual
98(3)
Instructional Interventions Based on the Theory
101(1)
Beyond Traditional Theories of Intelligence
102(1)
References
102(3)
Alternative Assessment from a Multiple Intelligences Theoretical Perspective
105(17)
Jie-Qi Chen
Howard Gardner
The Theory of Multiple Intelligences: Its Origins and Claims
106(1)
Challenges to Traditional Concepts of Intelligence
107(2)
Assessment From a Multiple Intelligence Perspective
109(3)
Project Spectrum: Domain-Specific Assessment
112(5)
Intelligence As Domain-Specific: Evidence From an Empirical Study
117(2)
Beyond Traditional Theories of Intelligence: Implications for Assessment
119(1)
Acknowledgments
119(1)
Note
120(1)
References
120(2)
The Three-Stratum Theory of Cognitive Abilities
122(9)
John B. Carroll
Origin of the Theory
122(2)
Operationalization and Application of the Theory
124(3)
Empirical Support for the Theory
127(1)
Beyond Traditional Theories of Intelligence
127(2)
References
129(2)
The Role of Intelligence in a Broad Model of Personal Competence
131(20)
Stephen Greenspan
John Driscoll
Description of the Model
132(3)
Historical Origins
135(3)
Applications of the Model for Practice and Research
138(4)
Validational Research
142(1)
Future Directions
143(2)
References
145(6)
Analysis of the Major Intelligence Batteries According to a Proposed Comprehensive Gf-Gc Framework
151(30)
Kevin S. McGrew
Carroll's Three-Stratum Model
152(1)
The Horn-Cattell Gf-Gc Model
152(1)
A Synthesized Carroll and Horn-Cattell Gf-Gc Framework
152(1)
The Gf-Gc Classification of Tests in Intelligence Batteries
153(7)
Summary of Gf-Gc Test Classifications
160(11)
Implications for Research and Practice
171(2)
Summary
173(1)
Notes
173(1)
References
173(2)
Appendix
175(6)
PART III New Tests and Alternative Techniques for Assessing Intelligence 181(164)
The Differential Ability Scales
183(26)
Colin D. Elliott
Structure of the DAS
183(1)
Theoretical Underpinnings
183(3)
Organization and Format
186(4)
Psychometric Properties
190(10)
Interpretation
200(4)
Beyond Traditional Intellectual Assessment
204(2)
Conclusion
206(1)
Note
206(1)
References
207(2)
The Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test
209(21)
Alan S. Kaufman
Nadeen L. Kaufman
Theory and Structure
209(3)
Administration and Scoring
212(1)
Psychometric Properties
213(2)
Interpretation
215(4)
Beyond Traditional Intellectual Assessment
219(4)
KAIT Case Study
223(4)
References
227(3)
The Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability---Revised
230(17)
Richard W. Woodcock
Design Objectives
231(1)
Theoretical Underpinnings
232(5)
Organization and Materials
237(4)
Special Features of the WJ and WJ-R COG
241(4)
Conclusion
245(1)
References
245(2)
Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive Theory and the Cognitive Assessment System: A New Theory-Based Measure of Intelligence
247(21)
Jack A. Naglieri
PASS Theory of Cognitive Processing
248(4)
Measures of Planning
252(2)
Measures of Attention
254(1)
Measures of Simultaneous and Successive Processes
255(2)
Validity
257(3)
How PASS and CAS Are Different From Traditional IQ
260(3)
Beyond Traditional Intellectual Assessment
263(1)
Conclusion
264(1)
References
265(3)
The Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test
268(13)
R. Steve McCallum
Bruce A. Bracken
Description of the Unit
268(5)
Psychometric Properties
273(6)
Beyond Traditional Intellectual Assessment: Unique Features of the Unit
279(1)
Conclusion
279(1)
References
279(2)
Dynamic Assessment Approaches
281(16)
Carol S. Lidz
The Concept of Dynamic Assessment
281(1)
Theoretical Bases of Dynamic Assessment
282(1)
Dynamic Assessment In Action
283(1)
Intervention (Mediation) Techniques
284(1)
Psychometric Issues of Dynamic Assessment Approaches
285(2)
Current Research
287(4)
Beyond Traditional Intellectual Assessment
291(2)
Conclusion
293(1)
References
293(4)
The Learning Potential Assessment Device
297(17)
Reuven Feuerstein
Rafi Feuerstein
Stephen Gross
Historical Origins
297(3)
The LPAD Theory, Instruments, and Techniques
300(4)
The Test Situation
304(4)
Interpretation of Results
308(1)
Individual Profile of Modifiability
309(1)
Beyond Traditional Intellectual Assessment
310(1)
Acknowledgments
310(1)
References
311(1)
Appendix
312(2)
A Cross-Battery Approach to Assessing and Interpreting Cognitive Abilities: Narrowing the Gap Between Practice and Cognitive Science
314(12)
Dawn P. Flanagan
Kevin S. McGrew
Foundations of the ``Cross-Battery'' Approach
315(5)
Operationalizing the Cross-Battery Approach
320(2)
Implications of the Cross-Battery Approach
322(1)
Conclusion
323(1)
References
323(3)
Issues and Suggestions for Training Professionals in Assessing Intelligence
326(19)
Vincent C. Alfonso
Sarah I. Pratt
The Importance of Quality Training in Cognitive Assessment
327(5)
Suggestions for Training
332(5)
Accountability
337(3)
Conclusion
340(1)
References
340(5)
PART IV Emerging Issues and New Directions in Intellectual Assessment 345(218)
Ontology, Structure, and Diagnostic Benefits of a Normative Subtest Taxonomy from the WISC-III Standardization Sample
349(24)
Joseph J. Glutting
Paul A. McDermott
Timothy R. Konold
Moving Beyond Traditional Schemes of Analysis
349(1)
Rationale Underlying Subtest Analysis
350(1)
Decision Rules
351(1)
Limitations of Current Methods
352(1)
Appropriate Strategy
353(1)
Method
354(3)
Results
357(8)
Discussion
365(3)
Conclusion
368(1)
Notes
369(1)
References
369(4)
Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis to Aid in Understanding the Constructs Measured by Intelligence Tests
373(30)
Timothy Z. Keith
A Sample Confirmatory Analysis
374(5)
Hierarchical Confirmatory Factor Analysis
379(4)
Comparing Alternative Methods
383(2)
Testing the Similarity of Factors
385(10)
Testing Theories of Intelligence
395(3)
Summary
398(2)
Acknowledgments
400(1)
Notes
400(1)
References
401(2)
Contemporary Models for the Biometric Genetic Analysis of Intellectual Abilities
403(34)
John J. McArdle
Carol A. Prescott
Selected BGIA Studies
403(2)
Controversy in BGIA Studies
405(1)
Structural Models in Behavior Genetics
406(2)
Basic Issues in BGIA Modeling Studies
408(9)
Advanced Issues in BGIA Modeling
417(5)
Future Questions for BGIA Studies
422(6)
Acknowledgments
428(1)
Notes
428(2)
References
430(7)
Diagnostic and Treatment Utility of Intelligence Tests
437(20)
Daniel J. Reschly
Overview
437(2)
Standardized Testing in Current Practice
439(1)
Current Uses of Intelligence Tests
439(8)
Alternative Instruments and Uses
447(4)
Summary
451(1)
References
451(6)
The Functional Utility of Intelligence Tests with Special Education Populations
457(27)
Dawn P. Flanagan
Ted J. Andrews
Judy L. Genshaft
The Link Between Psychology and Special Education in Historical Perspective, Criticisms of Traditional Intelligence Tests
458(1)
The Functional Utility of Intelligence Tests
459(18)
Conclusion
477(1)
Note
477(1)
References
477(7)
The Utility of Intelligence Tests for Preschool Children
484(19)
Bruce A. Bracken
Kathryn C. Walker
History of Preschool Intelligence Testing
484(3)
The Utility of Intelligence Testing
487(1)
Criteria For Technical Adequacy of Preschool Intelligence Measures
487(2)
Special Issues in the Assessment of Preschool Children
489(1)
Issues Concerning Traditional Preschool Intellectual Assessment
490(1)
Traditional and Nontraditional Approaches to the Assessment of Preschool Intelligence
491(8)
Recommendations for the Development of Preschool Intelligence Tests
499(1)
References
499(4)
The Cognitive Assessment of Limited English Proficient and Bilingual Children
503(14)
Emilia C. Lopez
Background and Definitions
503(1)
Legislative Guidelines and Professional Standards Relevant to LEP and Bilingual Children
504(2)
Assessment Issues and Procedures
506(3)
Utility of Cognitive Measures for LEP and Bilingual Children
509(2)
Future Trends in the Assessment of LEP and Bilingual Children
511(2)
Conclusion
513(1)
References
513(4)
The Triple Quandary of Race, Culture, and Social Class in Standardized Cognitive Ability Testing
517(16)
Janet E. Helms
Definitional and Cultural Equivalence Considerations
519(7)
Evaluation of Cultural Equivalence Enhancement Strategies
526(4)
Future Directions
530(1)
References
531(2)
An Integration and Synthesis of Contemporary Theories, Tests, and Issues in the Field of Intellectual Assessment
533(30)
Patti L. Harrison
Dawn P. Flanagan
Judy L. Genshaft
Current Practice
533(15)
Conclusion
548(7)
Acknowledgments
555(1)
References
555(8)
APPENDIX A Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethical Standard 2) 563(2)
2. Evaluation, Assessment, or Intervention
561(4)
APPENDIX B Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education 565(4)
Prepared By the Joint Commitee on Testing Practices
563(1)
A. Developing/Selecting Appropriate Tests
564(1)
B. Interpreting Scores
565(1)
C. Striving For Fairness
565(1)
D. Informing Test Takers
566(3)
APPENDIX C Code of Professional Responsibilities in Educational Measurement 569(10)
Prepared by the NCME Ad Hoc Committee on the Development of a Code of Ethics
567(1)
General Responsibilities
568(5)
Afterword
573(1)
Supplementary Resources
574(1)
Index to the Code of Professional Responsibilities in Educational Measurement
575(4)
Author Index 579(10)
Subject Index 589

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