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9780131118195

Curriculum Wisdom Educational Decisions in Democratic Societies

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780131118195

  • ISBN10:

    0131118196

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-10-06
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

Written by two of the most-recognized names in the field, the heart of this book revolves around the seven "modes of inquiry" that serve as guiding principles for designing curriculum that meets the needs of students, educators, parents, and the community at large.Coverage carefully balances theory and practicality, draws inspiration from a wide range of disciplines and contexts, and incorporates the wisdom of practicing curriculum designers from this country and others. Chapter titles include Curriculum Wisdom in Democratic Societies, Pragmatism: A Philosophy for Democratic Educators, The Arts of Inquiry: Toward Holographic Thinking, Personal and Structural Challenges, and Implications for Educational Practice.For teachers and administrators responsible for designing and implementing curriculum.

Table of Contents

1 Curriculum Wisdom in Democratic Societies 1(24)
The Quality of Curriculum Judgments
1(2)
A Rationale for the Book's Approach to Reform
3(1)
Introducing the Curriculum Wisdom Concept
4(3)
Staying Focused on Envisioning and Enacting
7(1)
Curriculum Wisdom as Problem Solving
8(1)
Understanding Democratic Morality
9(2)
Curriculum Wisdom as Authentic Enactment
11(6)
Collaboration
12(1)
Caring
13(1)
Character
13(1)
Challenge
14(2)
Calling
16(1)
A Teacher Reflects on Curriculum Wisdom
17(1)
A Preview of the Remaining Chapters
18(2)
Acknowledging Other Curriculum Interpretations
20(1)
Conclusion: A Faith in Educators
21(4)
2 Pragmatism: A Philosophy for Democratic Educators 25(16)
Introduction
25(1)
Pragmatism and the Pragmatists
26(4)
Contemporary Critiques of Pragmatism
30(2)
Current Challenges Facing Democracy
32(3)
Democratic Renewal: Toward Strong Democracy
35(6)
3 The Arts of Inquiry: Toward Holographic Thinking 41(26)
Introduction
41(3)
The Process of Making Judgments
44(2)
The Map and the Territory
46(2)
The Seven Modes of Inquiry
48(15)
Techné
48(2)
Poesis
50(1)
Praxis
51(2)
Dialogos
53(2)
Phronesis
55(3)
Polis
58(3)
Theoria
61(2)
Conclusion
63(4)
4 Personal and Structural Challenges 67(24)
Introduction
67(1)
Adult Identity Development
68(1)
Personal Challenges: Resistance, Relevance, and Readiness
69(1)
Kegan's Developmental Theory: Maintaining a Balance
70(1)
Resistance without Relevance
71(2)
Resistance with Relevance
73(1)
Readiness
74(2)
Developmental Resolutions-Understanding the Fit
76(1)
Developing Your Capacity to Meet the Demand
77(1)
Modes of Inquiry as Wisdom Guidance
78(3)
The Traditional Way of Knowing
78(1)
The Modern Way of Knowing
79(1)
The Postmodern Way of Knowing
79(2)
Structural Challenges to the Practice of Curriculum Wisdom
81(7)
Points to Ponder
88(3)
5 Implications for Educational Practice 91(10)
Introduction
91(1)
Practical Implications: Three Lenses
92(9)
A Paradigm Shift
93(3)
A Way of Professional Living
96(1)
Systemic Reform
97(4)
6 Three Practitioner Commentaries 101(34)
Introduction
101(1)
A Teacher's Commentary
101(14)
The Way of Living Lens
101(1)
A Paradigm Shift
102(9)
Systemic Reform
111(4)
A Teacher Educator's Commentary
115(10)
Building Inquiry Capacity for Preservice Teachers
115(2)
Possibilities for Building Inquiry Capacity
117(1)
Drawing From Dewey's Beliefs About Reflection
118(1)
One Possible Format for Collaborative Conversations
118(1)
The Challenge to Understand Curriculum Wisdom
119(2)
The "Why" of Teaching
121(1)
Teacher Critique
122(1)
The Importance of Collaborative Conversation
123(1)
Building Inquiry Capacity: Concluding Remarks
124(1)
A School Superintendent's Commentary
125(10)
7 Two Teacher Narratives 135(24)
Introduction
135(1)
A Teacher's Story
135(9)
A Teacher Educator's Story
144(15)
Critical Democratic Pedagogy: The 3 C's and the 3 A's
145(1)
Teachers Are Already (Tacit) Democratic Visionaries: Autobiographical Archeology
146(1)
The Pragmatic Prescription: Co-constructing a Democratic Culture
147(2)
Framing Controversial Discussions
149(2)
Can Truth and Youth Speak to Power: Advocacy Projects
151(1)
Looking Backward Is Super-Visionary: Constructing Critical Authentic Curriculum Projects
152(3)
Doubled Problem Solving: Particularizing the Real While Advancing the Ideal
155(1)
Concluding Comments
156(3)
8 Two Administrative Narratives 159(16)
Introduction
159(1)
A Central Office Administrator's Story
159(7)
A Principal's Story
166(9)
9 Three International Commentaries 175(28)
Introduction
175(1)
An Australian Commentary on Curriculum Wisdom
175(8)
Cultural Context
175(1)
Introduction
176(1)
A Broad-Brush Picture to Set the Scene
176(1)
A Summary of Our Recent Curriculum Work
177(4)
Some Observations to Finish for Now
181(2)
An African Commentary on Curriculum Wisdom
183(10)
Cultural Context
183(1)
Introduction
183(3)
Democratization and Education
186(2)
A Continent of Multiple Educational Ideologies
188(1)
National Priorities and the Arts of Inquiry
189(1)
The Change Process: Inquiry into a New Form of Dialogos in the African Context
190(1)
On Moral and Ethical Inquiry Needs
191(1)
Concluding Comments
192(1)
An Indian Commentary on Curriculum Wisdom
193(10)
Cultural Context
193(1)
Introduction
194(1)
Education Traditions and Curriculum Artistry
194(2)
Gandhi's Educational Philosophy
196(1)
Tagore's Educational Philosophy
197(1)
Reality versus Illusion: Colonized in Body and Mind
198(1)
Old Wine, New Bottle: Dialogos, Praxis, and Phronesis?
199(4)
Afterword 203(8)
The Accelerating Crisis of Democracy
203(1)
The Crisis in Democracy and the Crisis in Teaching
204(2)
Where Do We Go from Here?
206(5)
Glossary 211(2)
Author Index 213(4)
Subject Index 217

Excerpts

THREE WORKING ASSUMPTIONSThree basic assumptions have guided the creation of this book. First, we believe that it is possible to approach curriculum work as an exercise in "practical wisdom:" As you will read in Chapter 1, human wisdom is defined in theOxford English Dictionaryas "the capacity of judging rightly in matters relating to life and conduct; soundness of judgment in the choice of means and ends; sometimes, less strictly, sound sense, especially in practical affairs:' Curriculum workers who adopt a wisdom orientation are, therefore, challenging themselves To consider the "good conduct" and "enduring values" implications and consequences of their decisions; To think about the relationship between educational means and ends; and To engage in sophisticated practical reasoning.Aristotle's philosophy is an important foundational source for understanding practical wisdom. He writes that the practically wise person is someone who can carefully deliberate over the concrete specifics of individual matters while keeping an eye on what is "the best for man of things attainable by action" (Aristotle, 1941, p. 1028). Aristotle continues, "Nor is practical wisdom concerned with universals only--it must also recognize particulars; for it is practical, and practice is concerned with particulars" (p. 1028). Practical wisdom requires a doubled problem solving. The intent is to solve an immediate problem while advancing enduring values. This is a "means/end"and"means/visionary end" way of operating. The problem solving is situated in both the immediate present and the visionary future. The search for the resolution of a particular problem is, at the same time, an aspiration to advance a critically informed moral vision. Sensitive perception and venturesome imagination are equally important. Though this is a very demanding professional standard for curriculum decision making, we think many educators are capable of working in this way.Egan (2002) clarifies this standard for curriculum work. He notes that "it is always easier and more attractive to engage in technical work under an accepted paradigm than do hard thinking about the value-saturated idea of education" (p. 181). To avoid this trap, Egan writes, educators must think very broadly and deeply; they must make their conceptions of education "more elaborate and comprehensive" (p. 181), and as part of their decision making, they must carefully consider what "is the best way to be human, the best way to live" (p. 182). Approaching curriculum work in this way requires educators' best efforts to enact practical wisdom.Second, we will approach curriculum wisdom from alove of wisdom perspective--the frame of reference that serves as the etymological source for philosophy. To love wisdom is not the same as assuming that one is wise. In fact, it is its humble opposite. To love wisdom is to practice an open-hearted and open-minded life of inquiry. Hadot (2002) presents a Western history of the practice of the love of wisdom from Socrates through Kant and Nietzsche to the present and describes Socrates' insight into this practice:In theApologyPlato reconstructs, in his own way, the speech which Socrates gave before his judges in the trial in which he was condemned to death. Plato tells how Chaerephon, one of Socrates' friends, had asked the Delphic oracle if there was anyone wiser (sophos) than Socrates. The oracle had replied that no one was wiser than Socrates. Socrates wondered what the oracle could possibly have meant, and began a long search among politicians, poets, and artisans--people... who possessed wisdom or know-how--in order to find someone wiser than he. He noticed that all these people thought they knew everything, whereas in fact they knew nothing. Socrates then concluded that if in fact he was the wisest person, it was because he did

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