9781474437547

Eclipsed Cinema The Film Culture of Colonial Korea

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781474437547

  • ISBN10:

    1474437540

  • Edition: Reprint
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2018-09-01
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

In this ground-breaking investigation into the seldom-studied film culture of colonial Korea (1910-1945), Dong Hoon Kim brings new perspectives to the associations between colonialism, modernity, film historiography, and national cinema. In its attempt to reconstruct lost intricacies of colonial film history, Eclipsed Cinema explores the under-investigated aspects of colonial film culture such as the representational politics of colonial cinema, the film unit of the colonial government, the social reception of Hollywood cinema in relation to emerging Korean nationalism, Japanese settlers' film culture, and gendered film spectatorship. By filling a significant void in Asian film history, Eclipsed Cinema greatly expands the critical and historical scopes of early cinema, Korean and Japanese film histories, modern Asian culture, and colonial and postcolonial studies.

Author Biography


Dong Hoon Kim is Assistant Professor in East Asian Languages and Literatures and a member of the committee on Cinema Studies at the University of Oregon.

Table of Contents


List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements

INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCING JOSEON CINEMA: THE QUESTION OF FILM HISTORY AND THE FILM CULTURE OF COLONIAL KOREA

CHAPTER 1
THE BEGINNING: TOWARD A MASS ENTERTAINMENT
Film Culture Begins: The Development of Early Film Culture
Film Production Begins: Moving Picture Unit of the Office of the Governor-General

CHAPTER 2
JOSEON CINEMA, CINEMATIC JOSEON: ON SOME CRITICAL QUESTIONS OF JOSEON CINEMA
Desperately Seeking the Joseon Image: Arirang (1926) and the Making of Joseon Film Aesthetics
Joseon Film Lyricism: Joseon Colour and Joseon Films 'Exported' to Japan

CHAPTER 3
MIGRATING WITH THE MOVIES: JAPANESE SETTLER FILM CULTURE
The Formation and Characteristics of Settler Film Culture
'A Film Practice Distinctly Joseon': The Ethnic Segregation of Movie Theatres

CHAPTER 4
COLONIAL FILM SPECTATORSHIP: NATIONALIST ENOUGH?
Korean Spectators or How They Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Hollywood
Performing Colonial Identity: The Transcolonial Practice of Byeonsa/Benshi

CHAPTER 5
FILM SPECTATORSHIP AND THE TENSIONS OF MODERNITY
Modern Girls and Boys Go to the Movies: Cinema, Modernity, and the Colonised Nation
Mobility, Movie Theatres, and Female Film Spectatorship

CONCLUSION
INTEGRATING INTO THE IMPERIAL CINEMA
Appendix
Bibliography

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