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9780742538702

The Election After Reform Money, Politics, and the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act

by ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780742538702

  • ISBN10:

    0742538702

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2006-03-30
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

These groundbreaking studies, rich with data, include chapters on political parties, 527 committees and interest groups, television ads, the ground war, Congressional politics, and presidential campaigns. A must-read for its insightful and nuanced assessments of the effects of reform. Visit our website for sample chapters!

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables
ix
Acknowledgments xiii
Assessing the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act
1(18)
Michael J. Malbin
Summary Overview
2(2)
The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act
4(4)
How to Assess Moving Targets
8(1)
Preview of the Book
9(6)
Conclusions and Questions for the Future
15(4)
Part I: The Political Parties Post-BCRA
Party Finance in the Wake of BCRA: An Overview
19(19)
Anthony Carrado
Questions
20(2)
National Party Adaptation and Response
22(2)
Party Fundraising
24(5)
Party Expenditures
29(6)
Looking Ahead
35(1)
Notes
36(2)
The Parties' Congressional Campaign Committees in 2004
38(19)
Diana Dwyre
Robin Kolodny
What Has Changed? Resources
39(8)
Party Spending Post-BCR
47(9)
Conclusion
56(1)
State and Local Political Parties
57(22)
Raymond J. La Raja
The Setting
57(2)
Background on Campaign Finance Laws Affecting State Parties
59(1)
The Transition from FECA to BCRA
60(7)
How Did State Parties Spend Funds?
67(2)
Targeting of Party Expenditures
69(2)
Conclusion
71(3)
Notes
74(5)
Part II: Interest Groups and Advocacy Organizations
BCRA and the 527 Groups
79(33)
Stephen R. Weissman
Ruth Hassan
527s Replaced Some, but Not the Majority, of Soft Money
80(2)
``Repeaters'' and ``First Timers'' in 2004
82(2)
Parties, Presidential Campaigns, and the New 527s
84(6)
The Changing Mix of 527 Donors
90(1)
More Donors Gave at High Levels in 2004
91(2)
The Large Donors Gave Much More
93(4)
The Future of 527s
97(2)
Notes
99(2)
Appendix
101(11)
Interest Groups and Advocacy Organizations After BCRA
112(29)
Robert G. Boatright
Michael J. Malbin
Mark J. Rozell
Clyde Wilcox
Soft Money Donors
114(7)
Electioneering
121(16)
Number and Timing of Interest Group Ads
121(5)
Shifts in Activities: Coalitions and Mobilization
126(11)
Conclusion
137(1)
Notes
138(3)
Part III: Air Wars and Ground Wars
Much More of the Same: Television Advertising Pre- and Post-BCRA
141(20)
Michael M. Franz
Joel Rivlin
Kenneth Goldstein
BCRA and Political Advertising
143(3)
About the University of Wisconsin Advertising Project
146(1)
The Lessons of 2004
146(1)
Competitiveness
147(1)
Stand by Your Ad
148(3)
Parties and Groups
151(5)
Swift Boat and the Early Start
156(3)
Conclusion
159(1)
Notes
160(1)
Stepping Out of the Shadows? Ground-War Activity in 2004
161(24)
David B. Magleby
Kelly D. Patterson
BCRA and Its Effects on Ground-War Strategy in 2004
163(2)
The Competitive Environment of the 2004 Election
165(1)
Distribution of Ground-War Activity in 2004
166(4)
Ground-War Activity in Battleground States/Races
170(1)
Assessing the Ground War across Election Cycles
171(6)
Conclusion: Where Does the Ground War Go from Here?
177(3)
Notes
180(1)
Appendix A
180(1)
Appendix B
181(4)
Part IV: Candidates and Elections
The First Congressional Elections After BCRA
185(19)
Gary C. Jacobson
The Context of House Elections in 2004
186(2)
Campaign Money in the House Elections
188(4)
The Senate
192(1)
Campaign Money in the Senate Elections
193(4)
Outside Money, Negative Campaigns, and Millionaire Candidates
197(4)
Conclusion
201(1)
Notes
202(2)
Self-Financed Candidates and the ``Millionaires' Amendment''
204(15)
Jennifer A. Steen
The Benchmark: Goals of the Millionaires' Amendment
205(2)
Self-Financing in the 2004 Congressional Elections
207(8)
Consequences
215(1)
Notes
216(1)
Appendix
217(2)
A Public Funding System in Jeopardy: Lessons from the Presidential Nomination Contest of 2004
219(28)
Michael J. Malbin
Intersecting Rules
220(3)
The Political Context in 2004: ``It's All About Bush''
223(6)
The Democrats' Money Primary: The Insiders Seek Big Donors
229(1)
Large and Small Donor Fundraising
230(2)
Howard Dean Tests the Logic
232(4)
The Rest of 2003 and the Decision to Reject Public Funding
236(1)
Spend-Down Time: Iowa and New Hampshire through Super Tuesday
237(3)
Super Tuesday through the Conventions
240(2)
Conclusions and Policy Implications
242(3)
Notes
245(2)
Appendix 1: The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act A Summary 247(4)
Appendix 2: McConnell v. FEC 540 U.S. 93 [2003]: A Summary 251(2)
Introduction to Appendices 3 through 5 253(1)
Appendix 3: FEC Regulations: Soft Money 254(5)
Appendix 4: FEC Regulations: Coordinated and Independent Expenditures 259(7)
Appendix 5: FEC Regulations: Electioneering Communications 266(5)
Works Cited 271(12)
Index 283(8)
About the Authors
The Editor 291(1)
The Contributors 291

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