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Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory,9780130284839
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Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory

by ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780130284839

ISBN10:
0130284831
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $126.70
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Summary

Highly accurate and thoroughly updated, this classic has set the standard in electronic devices and circuit theory for over 25 years. Boylestad offers a complete and comprehensive survey, focusing on all the essentials needed to succeed on the job. Provides a colorful, reader-friendly layout that boasts a large number of stunning photographs. Integrates troubleshooting sections in most chapters, offering general hints on how to isolate a problem, identify its causes, and what action to take to rectify it. Includes over 40 new end-of-chapter practical examples added throughout. Expands coverage of computer software to include Mathcad, illustrating the versatility of the package for use in electronics. Adds summaries to the end of every chapter. Ideal for electronics professionals who want to brush up their software and troubleshooting skills.

Table of Contents

Preface v
Acknowledgments ix
Semiconductor Diodes
1(54)
Introduction
1(1)
Ideal Diode
1(2)
Semiconductor Materials
3(3)
Energy Levels
6(1)
Extrinsic Materials---n- and p-Type
7(3)
Semiconductor Diode
10(7)
Mathcad
17(3)
Resistance Levels
20(6)
Diode Equivalent Circuits
26(3)
Diode Specification Sheets
29(4)
Transition and Diffusion Capacitance
33(1)
Reverse Recovery Time
34(1)
Semiconductor Diode Notation
34(1)
Diode Testing
35(2)
Zener Diodes
37(3)
Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)
40(5)
Diode Arrays---Integrated Circuits
45(1)
Summary
46(1)
Computer Analysis
47(8)
Diode Applications
55(76)
Introduction
55(1)
Load-Line Analysis
56(6)
Diode Approximations
62(2)
Series Diode Configurations with DC Inputs
64(5)
Parallel and Series-Parallel Confiurations
69(3)
AND/OR Gates
72(2)
Sinusoidal Inputs; Half-Wave Rectification
74(3)
Full-Wave Rectification
77(4)
Clippers
81(7)
Clampers
88(4)
Zener Diodes
92(6)
Voltage-Multiplier Circuits
98(2)
Practical Applications
100(12)
Summary
112(1)
Computer Analysis
113(18)
Bipolar Junction Transistors
131(32)
Introduction
131(1)
Transistor Construction
132(1)
Transistor Operation
132(2)
Common-Base Configuration
134(4)
Transistor Amplifying Action
138(1)
Common-Emitter Configuration
139(7)
Common-Collector Configuration
146(1)
Limits of Operation
147(2)
Transistor Specification Sheet
149(4)
Transistor Testing
153(2)
Transistor Casing and Terminal Identification
155(1)
Summary
156(2)
Computer Analysis
158(5)
DC Biasing---BJTs
163(82)
Introduction
163(1)
Operating Point
164(2)
Fixed-Bias Circuit
166(7)
Emitter-Stabilized Bias Circuit
173(4)
Voltage-Divider Bias
177(9)
DC Bias with Voltage Feedback
186(3)
Miscellaneous Bias Configurations
189(6)
Design Operations
195(6)
Transistor Switching Networks
201(5)
Troubleshooting Techniques
206(3)
PNP Transistors
209(1)
Bias Stabilization
210(10)
Practical Applications
220(8)
Summary
228(3)
Computer Analysis
231(14)
Field-Effect Transistors
245(44)
Introduction
211(35)
Construction and Characteristics of JFETs
246(7)
Transfer Characteristics
253(6)
Specification Sheets (JFETs)
259(1)
Instrumentation
260(2)
Important Relationships
262(3)
Depletion-Type MOSFET
265(3)
Enhancement-Type MOSFET
268(8)
MOSFET Handling
276(1)
VMOS
277(1)
CMOS
278(2)
Summary Table
280(1)
Summary
281(1)
Computer Analysis
282(7)
Fet Biasing
289(66)
Introduction
289(1)
Fixed-Bias Configuration
290(4)
Self-Bias Configuration
294(7)
Voltage-Divider Biasing
301(6)
Depletion-Type MOSFETs
307(4)
Enhancement-Type MOSFETs
311(6)
Summary Table
317(2)
Combination Networks
319(3)
Design
322(2)
Troubleshooting
324(1)
P-Channel FETs
325(3)
Universal JFET Bias Curve
328(3)
Practical Applications
331(12)
Summary
343(1)
Computer Analysis
344(11)
BJT Transistor Modeling
355(34)
Introduction
355(1)
Amplification in the AC Domain
355(1)
BJT Transistor Modeling
356(2)
The Important Parameters: Zi, Zo, Av, Ai
358(6)
The re Transistor Model
364(7)
The Hybrid Equivalent Model
371(6)
Graphical Determination of the h-Parameters
377(4)
Variations of Transistor Parameters
381(8)
BJT Small-Signal Analysis
389(72)
Introduction
389(1)
Common-Emitter Fixed-Bias Configuration
389(4)
Voltage-Divider Bias
393(3)
CE Emitter-Bias Configuration
396(8)
Emitter-Follower Configuration
404(5)
Common-Base Configuration
409(2)
Collector Feedback Configuration
411(6)
Collector DC Feedback Configuration
417(3)
Approximate Hybrid Equivalent Circuit
420(6)
Complete Hybrid Equivalent Model
426(7)
Summary Table
433(1)
Troubleshooting
433(3)
Practical Applications
436(8)
Summary
444(2)
Computer Analysis
446(15)
FET Small-Signal Analysis
461(64)
Introduction
461(1)
FET Small-Signal Model
462(7)
JFET Fixed-Bias Configuration
469(3)
JFET Self-Bias Configuration
472(7)
JFET Voltage-Divider Configuration
479(1)
JFET Source-Follower (Common-Drain) Configuration
480(3)
JFET Common-Gate Configuration
483(4)
Depletion-Type MOSFETs
487(2)
Enhancement-Type MOSFETs
489(1)
E-MOSFET Drain-Feedback Configuration
490(3)
E-MOSFET Voltage-Divider Configuration
493(1)
Designing FET Amplifier Networks
494(3)
Summary Table
497(3)
Troubleshooting
500(1)
Practical Applications
500(10)
Summary
510(2)
Computer Analysis
512(13)
Systems Approach---Effects of Rs and RL
525(44)
Introduction
525(1)
Two-Port Systems
525(2)
Effect of a Load Impedance (RL)
527(5)
Effect of a Source Impedance (Rs)
532(2)
Combined Effect of Rs and RL
534(2)
BJT CE Networks
536(6)
BJT Emitter-Follower Networks
542(3)
BJT CB Networks
545(2)
FET Networks
547(3)
Summary Table
550(4)
Cascaded Systems
554(1)
Summary
555(2)
Computer Analysis
557(12)
BJT and JFET Frequency Response
569(58)
Introduction
569(1)
Logarithms
569(6)
Decibels
575(1)
General Frequency Considerations
576(3)
Low-Frequency Analysis---Bode Plot
579(7)
Low-Frequency Response---BJT Amplifier
586(8)
Low-Frequency Response---FET Amplifier
594(6)
Miller Effect Capacitance
600(2)
High-Frequency Response---BJT Amplifier
602(7)
High-Frequency Response---FET Amplifier
609(4)
Multistage Frequency Effects
613(2)
Square-Wave Testing
615(2)
Summary
617(3)
Computer Analysis
620(7)
Compound Configurations
627(48)
Introduction
627(1)
Cascade Connection
627(5)
Cascode Connection
632(1)
Darlington Connection
633(5)
Feedback Pair
638(4)
CMOS Circuit
642(2)
Current Source Circuits
644(2)
Current Mirror Circuits
646(5)
Differential Amplifier Circuit
651(6)
BIFET, BIMOS, and CMOS Differential Amplifier Circuits
657(1)
Summary
658(2)
Computer Analysis
660(15)
Operational Amplifiers
675(40)
Introduction
675(2)
Differential and Common-Mode Operation
677(4)
Op-Amp Basics
681(4)
Practical Op-Amp Circuits
685(6)
Op-Amp Specifications---DC Offset Parameters
691(3)
Op-Amp Specifications---Frequency Parameters
694(4)
Op-Amp Unit Specifications
698(6)
Summary
704(1)
Computer Analysis
705(10)
Op-Amp Applications
715(32)
Constant-Gain Multiplier
715(4)
Voltage Summing
719(3)
Voltage Buffer
722(1)
Controller Sources
723(2)
Instrumentation Circuits
725(4)
Active Filters
729(4)
Summary
733(1)
Computer Analysis
733(14)
Power Amplifiers
747(44)
Introduction---Definitions and Amplifier Types
747(2)
Series-Fed Class A Amplifier
749(5)
Transformer-Coupled Class A Amplifier
754(7)
Class B Amplifier Operation
761(4)
Class B Amplifier Circuits
765(7)
Amplifier Distortion
772(4)
Power Transistor Heat Sinking
776(4)
Class C and Class D Amplifiers
780(2)
Summary
782(2)
Computer Analysis
784(7)
Linear-Digital ICs
791(30)
Introduction
791(1)
Comparator Unit Operation
791(7)
Digital-Analog Converters
798(4)
Timer IC Unit Operation
802(3)
Voltage-Controlled Oscillator
805(3)
Phase-Locked Loop
808(4)
Interfacing Circuitry
812(3)
Summary
815(1)
Computer Analysis
815(6)
Feedback and Oscillator Circuits
821(38)
Feedback Concepts
821(1)
Feedback Connection Types
822(6)
Practical Feedback Circuits
828(7)
Feedback Amplifier---Phase and Frequency Considerations
835(2)
Oscillator Operation
837(2)
Phase-Shift Oscillator
839(3)
Wien Bridge Oscillator
842(1)
Tuned Oscillator Circuit
843(3)
Crystal Oscillator
846(4)
Unijunction Oscillator
850(2)
Summary
852(1)
Computer Analysis
853(6)
Power Supplies (Voltage Regulators)
859(30)
Introduction
859(1)
General Filter Considerations
859(3)
Capacitor Filter
862(3)
RC Filter
865(3)
Discrete Transistor Voltage Regulation
868(7)
IC Voltage Regulators
875(5)
Practical Applications
880(3)
Summary
883(1)
Computer Analysis
884(5)
Other Two-Terminal Devices
889(34)
Introduction
889(1)
Schottky Barrier (Hot-Carrier) Diodes
889(3)
Varactor (Varicap) Diodes
892(5)
Power Diodes
897(1)
Tunnel Diodes
898(4)
Photodiodes
902(4)
Photoconductive Cells
906(2)
IR Emitters
908(1)
Liquid-Crystal Displays
909(3)
Solar Cells
912(4)
Thermistors
916(2)
Summary
918(5)
pnpn And Other Devices
923(42)
Introduction
923(1)
Silicon-Controlled Rectifier
923(1)
Basic Silicon-Controlled Rectifier Operation
923(2)
SCR Characteristics and Ratings
925(2)
SCR Construction and Terminal Identification
927(1)
SCR Applications
928(4)
Silicon-Controlled Switch
932(2)
Gate Turn-Off Switch
934(1)
Light-Activated SCR
935(2)
Shockley Diode
937(1)
DIAC
938(2)
TRIAC
940(1)
Unijunction Transistor
941(9)
Phototransistors
950(2)
Opto-Isolators
952(3)
Programmable Unijunction Transistor
955(5)
Summary
960(5)
Oscillosope and Other Measuring Instruments
965(48)
Introduction
965(1)
Cathode Ray Tube---Theory and Construction
965(1)
Cathode Ray Oscilloscope Operation
966(1)
Voltage Sweep Operation
967(3)
Synchronization and Triggering
970(4)
Multitrace Operation
974(1)
Measurement Using Calibrated CRO Scales
974(5)
Special CRO Features
979(1)
Signal Generators
980(2)
Computer Analysis
982(1)
APPENDICES
A Making the Chips that Run the World
983(13)
B Hybrid Parameters---Conversion Equations (Exact and Approximate)
996(2)
C Ripple Factor and Voltage Calculations
998(7)
D Charts and Tables
1005(2)
E Solutions to Selected Odd-Numbered Problems
1007(6)
Index 1013

Excerpts

In this edition we have written additional practical examples and summaries at the end of each chapter, and have expanded coverage of computer software. The chapter on IC construction was deleted and replaced with a well-written description of the process that first appeared inSmithsonian Magazine.It has some stunning photographs and content that is excellent for the new students of this rapidly changing field. Over the years we have learned that improved readability can be obtained through the general appearance of the text, so we are committed to the format you find in this and recent editions of the text. We hope you agree that it makes the text material appear "friendlier" to the broad range of students using the text. As in the past, we continue to be committed to the strong pedagogical sense of the text, accuracy, completeness, and a broad range of ancillary materials that support the educational process. PEDAGOGY Reviewers and current users appear to be quite satisfied with the manner in which the content lends itself to a typical course syllabus. The improved pedagogy of the last two editions seems to support the instructor's lecture and helps students build the foundation necessary for future studies. The number of examples continues to grow, and isolated boldface statements continue to identify important concepts and conclusions. Color continues to be employed in a manner that helps define important regions of characteristics, or identifies important regions or parameters of a network. Icons at the top of the page, developed for each chapter of the text, facilitate referencing a particular area of text as quickly as possible. Problems which have been developed for each section of the text, progress from the simple to the more complex. The title of each section is repeated in the problem section to identify the problems associated with a particular subject matter. SYSTEMS APPROACH There is no question that the growing development of packaged systems requires that the student become aware at the earliest opportunity of a "systems approach" to the design and analysis of electronic systems. Isolated no-load networks are first discussed in Chapters 8 and 9 to introduce the important parameters of any package and develop the important equations for the configuration. The impact of a source or load impedance on the individual package is then defined in Chapter 10 on a general basis before examining specific networks. Finally, the impact of tying the individual packages together is examined in the same chapter to establish some understanding of the systems approach. The later chapters on op-amps and IC units further develop the concepts introduced in these early chapters. ACCURACY The goal of any educational publication is to be absolutely free of errors. There is nothing more distressing to a student than to find that he or she has suffered for hours over a simple printing error. In fact, after all the hours that go into preparing a manuscript and checking every word, number, or letter there is nothing more distressing to an author than to find that errors have crept into the publication. Based on past history and the effort put into this publication, we believe you will find the highest level of accuracy obtainable for a publication of this kind. SUMMARIES In response to current users, summaries are added at the end of eactl chapter, reviewing the salient concepts and conclusions. To emphasize specific words and phrases, boldface lettering is used in much the same manner as a student would use a highlighting marker. The list of equations appearing with each summary was limited to those an instructor realistically hopes the student will bring away from the course. PRACTICAL EXAMPLES While the text now has over 80 practical examples, over 40 were added to this edition and they appear in their own sections. They provide an understanding of t


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