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The Elements of Moral Philosophy,9780070525603

The Elements of Moral Philosophy

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780070525603

ISBN10:
0070525609
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/1/1998
Publisher(s):
McGraw Hill College Div
List Price: $24.85
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Summary

Firmly established as the standard text for undergraduate courses in ethics, this concise, lively book combines clear explanations of the main theories of ethics with discussions of interesting examples. Topics covered include famine relief, euthanasia, homosexuality, and the treatment of animals. The text's versatility allows it to be widely used not only in ethical theory courses, but also in applied ethics courses of all kinds.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
About the Third Edition xiii
What is Morality?
1(19)
The Problem of Definition
1(1)
An Infant with No Prospects: Baby Theresa
1(4)
An Infant with Uncertain Prospects: Baby Jane Doe
5(8)
A Child with No Further Prospects: Tracy Latimer
13(2)
Reason and Impartiality
15(4)
The Minimum Conception of Morality
19(1)
The Challenge Of Cultural Relativism
20(17)
How Different Cultures Have Different Moral Codes
20(2)
Cultural Relativism
22(1)
The Cultural Differences Argument
23(2)
The Consequences of Taking Cultural Relativism Seriously
25(2)
Why There Is Less Disagreement Than It Seems
27(2)
How All Cultures Have Some Values in Common
29(2)
Judging a Cultural Practice to Be Undesirable
31(3)
What Can Be Learned from Cultural Relativism
34(3)
Subjectivism In Ethics
37(16)
The Basic Idea of Ethical Subjectivism
37(1)
The Evolution of the Theory
38(1)
The First Stage: Simple Subjectivism
39(2)
The Second Stage: Emotivism
41(4)
Emotivism, Reason, and ``Moral Facts''
45(2)
Are There Proofs in Ethics?
47(3)
The Question of Homosexuality
50(3)
Does Morality Depend On Religion?
53(17)
The Presumed Connection between Morality and Religion
53(2)
The Divine Command Theory
55(4)
The Theory of Natural Law
59(5)
Christianity and the Problem of Abortion
64(6)
Psychological Egoism
70(12)
Is Unselfishness Possible?
70(1)
The Strategy of Reinterpreting Motives
71(2)
Two Arguments in Favor of Psychological Egoism
73(4)
Clearing Away Some Confusions
77(2)
The Deepest Error in Psychological Egoism
79(3)
Ethical Egoism
82(14)
Is There a Duty to Contribute for Famine Relief?
82(3)
Three Arguments in Favor of Ethical Egoism
85(5)
Three Arguments against Ethical Egoism
90(6)
The Utilitarian Approach
96(11)
The Revolution in Ethics
96(3)
First Example: Euthanasia
99(3)
Second Example: Nonhuman Animals
102(5)
The Debate Over Utilitarianism
107(15)
The Resilience of the Theory
107(1)
Is Happiness the Only Thing That Matters?
108(2)
Are Consequences All That Matter?
110(5)
The Defense of Utilitarianism
115(7)
Are There Absolute Moral Rules?
122(10)
Kant and the Categorical Imperative
122(3)
Absolute Rules and the Duty Not to Lie
125(3)
Conflicts between Rules
128(1)
Another Look at Kant's Basic Idea
129(3)
Kant And Respect For Persons
132(11)
The Idea of ``Human Dignity''
132(3)
Retribution and Utility in the Theory of Punishment
135(3)
Kant's Retributivism
138(5)
The Idea Of A Social Contract
143(19)
Hobbes's Argument
143(4)
The Prisoner's Dilemma
147(5)
Some Advantages of the Social Contract Theory of Morals
152(3)
The Problem of Civil Disobedience
155(3)
Difficulties for the Theory
158(4)
Feminism And The Ethics Of Care
162(13)
Do Women and Men Think Differently about Ethics?
162(7)
Implications for Moral Judgment
169(4)
Implications for Ethical Theory
173(2)
The Ethics Of Virtue
175(19)
The Ethics of Virtue and the Ethics of Right Action
175(2)
The Virtues
177(10)
Some Advantages of Virtue Ethics
187(2)
The Incompleteness of Virtue Ethics
189(5)
What Would A Satisfactory Moral Theory Be Like?
194(14)
Morality without Hubris
194(7)
The Moral Community
201(1)
Justice and Fairness
202(6)
Suggestions for Further Reading 208(10)
Notes on Sources 218(9)
Index 227


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