9781118393239

Emerging Epidemics Management and Control

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781118393239

  • ISBN10:

    1118393236

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2013-09-23
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
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Summary

A global perspective on the management and prevention of emerging and re-emerging diseases

Emerging infectious diseases are newly identified or otherwise previously unknown infections that cause public health challenges. Re-emerging infectious diseases are due to both the reappearance of and an increase in the number of infections from a disease that is known, but which had formerly caused so few infections that it was no longer considered a public health problem. The factors that cause the emergence or re-emergence of a disease are diverse.

This book takes a look at the world's emerging and re-emerging diseases. It covers the diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and control of a variety of individual diseases, and examines the social and behavioral issues that could contribute to epidemics. Each chapter focuses on an individual disease and provides scientific background and social history as well as the current basics of infection, epidemiology, and control.

Emerging Epidemics: Management and Control offers five topics of coverage:

FUNDAMENTALS

  • Epidemics fundamentals
  • Disasters and epidemics
  • Biosafety

RE-EMERGING EPIDEMICS

  • Tuberculosis
  • Plague

NEWLY EMERGING EPIDEMICS

  • Leptospirosis
  • Dengue
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • Chikungunya Fever
  • West Nile Virus
  • Chandipura Virus Encephalitis
  • Kyasanur Forest Disease
  • Hantavirus
  • Human, Avian, and Swine Influenza
  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
  • Nipah Virus
  • Paragonimiasis
  • Melioidosis

POTENTIAL EPIDEMICS

  • Biowarfare and bioterrorism
  • Food contamination and food terrorism
  • Antimicrobial resistance

VECTOR CONTROL METHODS

  • Mosquito control
  • Other disease vectors and their control

Offering an integrated, worldwide overview of the complexity of the epidemiology of infections, Emerging Epidemics will be a valuable resource for students, physicians, and scientists working in veterinary, medical, and the pharmaceutical sciences.

Table of Contents


SECTION-1: FUNDAMENTALS

Chapter 1
Prologue
1.1 - Introduction
1.2 - Causative factors
1.3 - Salient features
1.4 - "Emerging" epidemics
1.5 - "Re-emerging" epidemics
1.6 - Antimicrobial resistance
1.7 - Public health implications

Chapter 2
Epidemics: Fundamentals
2.1 - Introduction
2.2 - Definitions
2.3 - Types of epidemics
2.4 - Epidemiological triad
2.5 - Forecasting epidemics
2.6 - Contingency plan
2.7 - Investigation of epidemics
2.8 - Managing epidemics
2.9 - Control of epidemics
2.10 - Principles of planning emergency services

Chapter 3
Disasters and epidemics
3.1 - Fundamentals
3.2 - Contributory factors
3.3 - Investigation of rumours

Chapter 4
Biosafety
4.1 - Introduction
4.2 - Components
4.3 - Hand washing
4.4 - Preventing needle stick injuries
4.5 - Safe transport of biological materials
4.6 - Safe decontamination of spills
4.7 - Safe handling of dead bodies
4.8 - Personal protective equipment
4.9 - Management of biomedical waste
4.10 - Infection control checklist
4.11 - Biosafety levels
4.12 - Accreditation of hospitals and laboratories

SECTION-2: RE-EMERGING EPIDEMICS

Chapter 5
Tuberculosis
5.1 - History of tuberculosis
5.2 - Magnitude
5.3 - Agent factors
5.4 - Host factors and high-risk groups
5.5 - Environmental factors
5.6 - Mode of transmission
5.7 - Pathology and immunology
5.8 - Clinical manifestations in adults and children
5.9 - Diagnosis
5.10 - Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS)
5.11 - MDR & XDR tuberculosis
5.12 - Prevention and control
5.13 - Social and cultural factors

Chapter 6
Plague
6.1 - History of plague
6.2 - Magnitude
6.3 - Agent factors
6.4 - Host factors
6.5 - Environmental factors
6.6 - Reservoir
6.7 - Mode of transmission
6.8 - Clinical manifestations
6.9 - Diagnosis
6.10 - Clinical management
6.11 - Prevention and control

SECTION-3: NEWLY EMERGING EPIDEMICS

Chapter 7
Leptospirosis
7.1 - Introduction
7.2 - Magnitude
7.3 - Agent factors
7.4 - Host and behavioural factors
7.5 - Environmental factors
7.6 - Mode of transmission
7.7 - Pathology and immunology
7.8 - Clinical manifestations
7.9 - Laboratory diagnosis
7.10 - Clinical management
7.11 - Surveillance
7.12 - Investigation of an outbreak
7.13 - Prevention and control

Chapter 8
Dengue
8.1 - Introduction
8.2 - Magnitude
8.3 - The dengue virus
8.4 - Host factors
8.5 - Environmental factors
8.6 - Vector biology
8.7 - Clinical features
8.8 - Laboratory diagnosis
8.9 - Clinical management
8.10 - Investigation of outbreaks
8.11 - Prevention and control

Chapter 9
Japanese encephalitis
9.1 - Historical aspects
9.2 - Magnitude of the problem
9.3 - Epidemiology
9.4 - Vector biology
9.5 - Clinical features
9.6 - Differential diagnosis
9.7 - Laboratory diagnosis
9.8 - Case management
9.9 - Prevention and Control

Chapter 10
Chikungunya fever
10.1 - Magnitude
10.2 - Epidemiology
10.3 - Clinical features
10.4 - Laboratory diagnosis
10.5 - Clinical management
10.6 - Investigation of outbreaks
10.7 - Prevention and control

Chapter 11
West Nile fever
11.1 - Global scenario
11.2 - Epidemiology
11.3 - Clinical features
11.4 - Laboratory diagnosis
11.5 - Clinical management
11.6 - Investigation of outbreaks
11.7 - Prevention and control

Chapter 12
Chandipura virus encephalitis
12.1 - Magnitude
12.2 - Epidemiology
12.3 - Clinical features
12.4 - Laboratory diagnosis
12.5 - Clinical management
12.6 - Investigation of outbreaks
12.7 - Prevention and control

Chapter 13
Kyasanur forest disease
13.1 - Introduction
13.2 - Magnitude of the problem
13.3 - Epidemiology
13.4 - Vector biology
13.5 - Clinical features
13.6 - Differential diagnosis
13.7 - Laboratory diagnosis
13.8 - Case management
13.9 - Prevention and Control

Chapter 14
Hanta virus disease
14.1 - Introduction
14.2 - Global scenario
14.3 - Epidemiology
14.4 - Clinical features
14.5 - Differential diagnosis
14.6 - Laboratory diagnosis
14.7 - Case management
14.8 - Prevention and Control

Chapter 15
Human influenza
15.1 - Historical aspects
15.2 - Global scenario
15.3 - Agent factors
15.4 - Host factors
15.5 - Environmental factors
15.6 - Mode of transmission
15.7 - Clinical manifestations
15.8 - Laboratory diagnosis
15.9 - Clinical management
15.10 - Surveillance
15.11 - Investigation of an outbreak
15.12 - Prevention and control

Chapter 16
Avian influenza
16.1 - Magnitude of the problem
16.2 - H5N1 influenza virus
16.3 - Host factors
16.4 - Reservoir
16.5 - Mode of transmission
16.6 - Clinical manifestations
16.7 - Laboratory diagnosis
16.8 - Clinical management
16.9 - Surveillance
16.10 - Investigation of an outbreak
16.11 - Prevention and control

CHapter 17
Paragonimiasis
17.1 - Magnitude of the problem
17.2 - Paragonimus westermani
17.3 - Epidemiology
17.4 - Clinical manifestations
17.5 - Laboratory diagnosis
17.6 - Clinical management
17.7 - Public health importance

Chapter 18
Melioidosis
17.1 - Magnitude of the problem
17.2 - Burkholdera pseudomallei
17.3 - Epidemiology
17.4 - Clinical manifestations
17.5 - Laboratory diagnosis
17.6 - Clinical management
17.7 - Public health importance

SECTION-4: POTENTIAL EPIDEMICS

Chapter 19
Biowarfare & bioterrorism
19.1 - Historical aspects
19.2 - Potential agents
19.3 - Epidemiological clues
19.4 - Laboratory diagnosis
19.5 - Clinical management
19.6 - Surveillance and investigation
19.7 - Investigation of an outbreak
19.8 - Preparedness and containment

Chapter 20
Food contamination & food terrorism
20.1 - Historical aspects
20.2 - Potential agents
20.3 - Epidemiological clues
20.4 - Laboratory diagnosis
20.5 - Clinical management
20.6 - Surveillance and investigation
20.7 - Investigation of an outbreak
20.8 - Preparedness and containment

Chapter 21
Antimicrobial resistance
21.1 - Introduction
21.2 - Global scenario
21.3 - Organisms
21.4 - Host factors
21.5 - Health-related and economic hazards
21.6 - Laboratory diagnosis
21.8 - Managing antimicrobial resistance
21.9 - Prevention and Control

SECTION-5: VECTOR CONTROL METHODS

Chapter 22
Conventional methods for mosquito control
22.1 - Mosquito: habits & attractants
22.2 - Environmental manipulation
22.3 - Anti-larval measures
22.4 - Chemical adulticides
22.5 - Repellents
22.6 - Insecticide-impregnated bed nets & screens

Chapter 23
New & potential techniques: mosquito control
23.1 - Myco-insecticides
23.2 - Entomopathogenic bacteria & viruses
23.3 - Hormonomimetic & plant-derived substances
23.4 - Larvivorous fish and crustaceans
23.5 - Dragonfly nymphs
23.6 - Protozoa
23.7 - Mermithid nematodes
23.8 - Predator larvae
23.9 - Genetic engineering

Chapter 24
Other disease vectors & their control
24.1 - Housefly
24.2 - Sand fly
24.3 - Deer fly
24.4 - Black fly
24.5 - Tsetse fly
24.6 - Water flea (Cyclops)
24.7 - Sand flea (Jigger or Chigoe flea)
24.8 - Rat flea & Other fleas
24.9 - Reduviid bug
24.10 - Hard tick
24.11 - Soft tick
24.11 - Lice
24.12 - Cockroach
24.13 - Mites (Chiggers)
24.14 - General principles of vector control
24.15 - Integrated vector control
24.16 - Rodents
24.17 - Methods for rodent control

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