9781412904063

Family Communication : Nurturing and Control in a Changing World

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781412904063

  • ISBN10:

    1412904064

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-11-09
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications, Inc

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Summary

Family Communication: Nurturing and Control in a Changing World thoroughly reviews the traditional family communication theories of roles theory, family systems theory, and rules theory in an engaging, non-traditional way. This book uniquely organizes the study of family communication around the concepts of nurturing and control in all family relationships, across all family forms, and their relationships to psychological processes and communicative outcomes in families. Key Features: Looks at Family in All Forms: Traditional nuclear; non-traditional nuclear; bi-nuclear families; cohabitation, single-parent households; step-family and blended configurations; gay families; couples with no children; and extended families are all examined. While not all families fit neatly within any of the traditional definitions, this book articulates a sentiment that most students can resonate to'”that all family forms include some form of nurturing and control. Explores Sociological and Psychological Factors: Various forces such as governmental, religious, media influences, and social science research, cause us to assume most families are traditional and nuclear, using biological, legal, and sociological definitions. In addition to the sociological and psychological bases of developmental processes, the development of parental attachment is fully discussed, showing how nurturing and controlling communication processes encourage socio-emotional competence in children. Explicates New Research Findings: A new family communication theory'” Inconsistent Nurturing as Control Theory '”explores the ways in which family members attempt to change the undesirable behaviors of a particular family member (e.g., substance abuser, eating disordered individual, gambler, depressed person, violent individual) through their use of nurturing as control. Intended Audience: Perfect for the introductory undergraduate course in Family Communication; as well as courses in Sociology, Social and Clinical Psychology, Educational Psychology, Family Counseling, Family Education, and Home Economics

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xiii
Preface xv
Introduction: Families, Communication, and Family Communication
1(28)
Families
4(7)
Biological Definitions
5(1)
Legal Definitions
6(1)
Sociological Definitions
7(2)
All Family Forms Include Nurturing and Control Functions
9(2)
Communication
11(4)
Information, Behavior, and Communication
13(1)
Source Versus Receiver Versus Message-Centered Orientations
14(1)
Family Communication
15(1)
Why Communication Is Central to Families
16(11)
Both Nurturing and Control Require Communication
16(1)
Changing Family Forms Require Communication for Coordination
17(2)
Roles, Systems, and Rules Require Communication
19(1)
Relationship Development Leading to Coupling Requires Communication
20(1)
Adding Children Requires Communication
21(1)
Raising Children Requires Communication
21(1)
Balancing Intimacy and Autonomy Requires Communication
22(1)
Managing Conflict Requires Communication
23(1)
Dealing With Violence Requires Communication
24(1)
Changing Undesirable Behavior in the Family Requires Communication
25(1)
The Powerful Role of Communication of Expectations in Families
26(1)
Summary
27(1)
Key Terms
28(1)
Questions for Application
28(1)
Family Forms in Our Changing Society
29(24)
The Family Context
29(4)
Implications for Communication in the Family
32(1)
Societal Influences on the Family Form
33(4)
Governmental Regulations
33(3)
Religious Influences
36(1)
Social Science Influences
37(1)
Family Forms
37(14)
Cohabiting Couples
37(2)
Couples With No Children
39(2)
Nuclear Families
41(1)
Gay Couples (and Gay Couples With Children)
41(3)
Single-Parent Families
44(3)
Blended and Binuclear Families
47(3)
Extended Families
50(1)
Summary
51(1)
Key Terms
52(1)
Questions for Application
52(1)
Theoretical Approaches to Understanding Communication in the Family
53(30)
Introduction of Theory
54(1)
Family Communication Theories
55(26)
Roles Theory
56(2)
Family Roles
58(13)
Family Systems Theory
71(8)
Rules Theory
79(2)
Summary
81(1)
Key Terms
82(1)
Questions for Application
82(1)
Forming the New Family Pairing: Two Become One
83(28)
Social-Psychological Bases of Attraction
85(8)
Factors Relevant to Relationship Initiation, Communication, and Development
85(2)
Factors Related to Mate Selection, Communication, and Relationship Development
87(3)
Communication Theories and Models of Relationship Development
90(3)
Psychoanalytic Bases of Attraction
93(8)
Attachment Theory: The Role of Early Parental Attachment on Romantic Relationships
93(5)
The Influence of Partner's Attachment Style on the Communication of Involvement
98(3)
Relational Stages of Development
101(7)
Communication During Casual Dating, Serious Dating, Commitment, and Engagement
101(3)
Cohabitation
104(1)
Marriage
105(3)
Summary
108(2)
Key Terms
110(1)
Questions for Application
110(1)
Communication in the Newly Formed Family: Adding Children
111(22)
The Effects of Pregnancy on Communication
112(2)
Addition of a Child and Changes in Communication
114(12)
Increases in Workload and Changes in Communication
115(7)
Infant-Caregiver Communication
122(4)
Communication in Sibling Relationships
126(1)
Adding Children Through Remarriage: Communication in the Stepparent-Stepchild Relationship
127(3)
Stepparent-Stepchild Communication
128(1)
Stepsibling Communication
129(1)
Summary
130(1)
Key Terms
131(1)
Questions for Application
131(2)
Nurturing and Controlling Communication: Raising Socioemotionally and Intellectually Competent Children
133(30)
Control: Providing Discipline and Guidance Through Communication
134(15)
Parenting Styles: Communication Strategies
134(5)
Parenting Practices: Using Communication to Enact Discipline
139(10)
Nurturing: Providing Support and Love
149(10)
Enhancing Physical Development Through Communication
149(1)
Encouraging Physical Activity Through Communication
150(1)
Maintaining Physical Health Through Communication
150(4)
Enhancing Socioemotional Development Through Communication
154(3)
Encouraging Social Development Through Communication
157(1)
Encouraging Academic Development Through Communication
158(1)
Summary
159(1)
Key Terms
160(1)
Questions for Application
161(2)
Nurturing Communication in Marital Relationships: Encouraging Closeness, Stability, and Satisfaction Through Communication
163(24)
Maintaining Closeness in Marital Relationships
166(5)
Dialectic Models of Relationship Maintenance: The Autonomy-Closeness Dialectic
167(3)
Protectedness in Marriage: Communication Privacy Management (CPM) Theory
170(1)
The Communication of Closeness in the Marital Relationship
171(13)
Self-Disclosure
172(2)
Expressions of Affection
174(1)
Communication of Support
175(2)
Emotional Regulation and Expression
177(2)
Sexual Intimacy and Communication
179(2)
Factors Related to Marital Satisfaction That May Affect Marital Communication
181(3)
Summary
184(1)
Key Terms
185(1)
Questions for Application
185(2)
Control in Marital Relationships and the Family: Conflict, Constructive and Destructive Conflict, and Violence
187(30)
The Nature of Conflict
189(3)
Models of Conflict
192(5)
Explanatory Model of Interpersonal Conflict
192(2)
Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse Model
194(2)
Social-Structural Model of Demand-Withdraw
196(1)
Conflict Styles
197(3)
Avoiders
198(1)
Volatiles
198(1)
Validators
199(1)
Conflict Strategies (Interpersonal Influence)
200(3)
Instrumental Goals
200(1)
Relationship Goals
201(1)
Identity Goals
201(1)
Persuasive Outcomes and Reciprocity of Conflict Strategies
202(1)
The Nature of Violence
203(10)
Profile of the Battered
207(2)
Profile of the Batterer
209(1)
Models of Violence in the Family
210(3)
Summary
213(2)
Key Terms
215(1)
Questions for Application
215(2)
Nurturing and Controlling Communication Surrounding Undesirable Behavior in the Family
217(24)
Undesirable Behavior in the Family
218(10)
Substance Abuse and Communication in the Family
219(4)
Children With Eating Disorders and Communication in the Family
223(2)
Depression and Communication in the Family
225(3)
The Potential Role of Communication and Problematic Behavior in Families
228(6)
Family Systems Theory
228(1)
Coercion Theory
229(1)
Inconsistent Nurturing as Control Theory
230(1)
Paradoxes
231(1)
Nurturing and Control
231(1)
Paradoxical Outcomes in Learning Theory Terms
232(2)
Application of INC Theory to Undesirable Behavior in the Family
234(3)
Substance Abusers
234(2)
Children With Eating Disorders
236(1)
Depression
237(1)
Summary
237(1)
Key Terms
238(1)
Questions for Application
239(2)
Family Communication: Providing Nurturing and Control in a Changing World
241(20)
What We Have Learned
241(2)
The Current Configuration of Families: Nurturing and Controlling Communication
243(4)
Improving Family Communication
247(11)
How You Think Is What you Feel: Or Perception Is Reality
250(1)
The Role of Perceptions in the Successful Development of the Family
250(2)
The Role of Perceptions in Parent-Child Communication
252(2)
The Role of Perceptions in Destructive Communication Patterns
254(1)
How You Communicate Is What You Get: Or the Golden Rule of Communication
255(3)
Summary
258(2)
Key Terms
260(1)
Questions for Application
260(1)
Glossary 261(8)
References 269(48)
Index 317(28)
About the Author 345

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