9780803973893

Family Stress Management : A Contextual Approach

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780803973893

  • ISBN10:

    0803973896

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2001-11-09
  • Publisher: Sage Publications, Inc

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Summary

Why do some families survive stressful situations while others fall apart? Can a family's beliefs and values be used as a predictor of vulnerability to stress? And most importantly, can family stress be prevented? In this Second Edition, Pauline Boss continues to explore both the larger context surrounding families and stress and the inner context, which includes perceptions and meanings. The author emphasizes the need for a more general contextual model of family stress that may be applicable to a wider diversity of people and families as well as a wider variety of stresses and crises than other models. The goal is to provide a framework for students and professionals engaged in helping families learn how to manage their stress.

Author Biography

Pauline Boss, PhD, is Professor and Clinical Supervisor in the doctoral training program in marriage and family therapy in the Department of Family Social Science at the University of Minnesota

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Acknowledgments xiii
What Is New?
1(14)
What Is New in Family Stress Theory?
2(12)
Summary
14(1)
The Contextual Model: Understanding Family Stress in Science and Practice
15(24)
Family Stress Versus Individual Stress: A Conceptual Dilemma
16(1)
Family Stress Defined
16(2)
Defining the Family: A Matter of Bias
18(3)
General Systems Theory: The Family as System
21(1)
Symbolic Interaction as a Base for Studying Perceptions and Meanings
22(3)
Diversity and Multiculturalism in Family Stress Management
25(1)
Gender in Family Stress Management
26(2)
Why a Contextual Model?
28(2)
Looking Back
30(5)
The Theory-Building Process for Science and Practice
35(4)
Definitions: A Guide to Family Stress Theory
39(32)
The Family's External Context
40(4)
The Family's Internal Context
44(2)
The ABC of Family Stress: A Frame for Definitions
46(1)
Stressor Event (Stressful Event) Defined
47(3)
Classification of Family Stressor Events
50(7)
The Primacy of Perceptions in the Contextual Model of Family Stress
57(2)
The Meaning to the Family of a Stressful Event or Situation
59(1)
Perceptions of Events Can Be Distorted
60(1)
Family Stress Defined
61(1)
Family Crisis Defined
62(6)
Family Strain (Burnout) Defined
68(3)
Coping, Adapting, Being Resilient...or Is It Managing?
71(22)
Coping in Individual Stress Theory
73(4)
Family and Individual Coping and Resiliency: The Need for a Dialectical View
77(1)
Family Coping Defined
78(1)
Deductive Evidence for the Social-Psychological Definition of Family Coping
79(2)
The Possibility of ``Inherited'' Coping Strategies
81(1)
A Caution About Coping and Resiliency
81(4)
Complexities of Coping
85(2)
The Chain Reaction of Stressor Events
87(1)
Family Coping Resources
88(1)
Family Managing as Outcome
89(4)
Boundary Ambiguity: A Risk Factor in Family Stress Management
93(20)
The Family's Internal Context
93(1)
Family Boundary Ambiguity
94(10)
Normative Boundary Ambiguity in Families Throughout the Life Cycle
104(9)
The Link Between Ambiguity and Ambivalence in Family Stress Management
113(10)
Theoretical Roots
114(1)
Definitions and Differences Between Ambiguity and Ambivalence
114(5)
Linking Ambiguity and Ambivalence to Family Stress Management, Resilience, and Context
119(4)
Denial: Barrier or Buffer in Family Stress Management?
123(12)
How Some Families Break Through Denial
130(5)
Family Values and Belief Systems: Influences on Family Stress Management
135(14)
Why Values and Beliefs Are Important
136(2)
Values and Beliefs as They Affect ``Blaming the Victim''
138(5)
Values and Beliefs About Gender: Are They Related to Family Stress Management?
143(6)
The Family's External Context
149(10)
External Forces With Which Families Contend
150(6)
Societal Pressure on the Family
156(3)
Family Crisis: Overcoming Trauma and Victimization
159(16)
Family Victimization as Crisis
161(2)
Self-Blame: Is It Helpful?
163(1)
Chronic Threat of Victimization From Outside the Family
164(1)
Chronic Victimization From Inside the Family
165(1)
Cultural Violence and Victimization
166(2)
The Theory of a Just World
168(1)
Flaws in the Just World Theory
169(2)
Empowering Victimized Families
171(4)
Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?
175(12)
Where Have We Been?
175(1)
Where Are We Going? Recommendations for Future Research and Practice
176(6)
What is Still Needed?
182(2)
The Dilemma Remains: Do We Focus on the Individual or the Family?
184(1)
Final Thoughts
184(3)
Postscript 187(2)
References 189(18)
Index 207(10)
About the Author 217

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