9780618002221

The Fellowship of the Ring

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780618002221

  • ISBN10:

    0618002227

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1999-09-15
  • Publisher: Mariner Books
  • View Upgraded Edition

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Summary

A New York Times Bestseller--Part One of --The Lord of the Rings--In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins is faced with an immense task as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the One Ring of Sauron to his care. Frodo must make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the all-powerful Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose.

Author Biography

J.R.R. Tolkien (1892–1973), beloved throughout the world as the creator of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, was a professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford, a fellow of Pembroke College, and a fellow of Merton College until his retirement in 1959. His chief interest was the linguistic aspects of the early English written tradition, but even as he studied these classics he was creating a set of his own.

Table of Contents

Note on the Text
Foreword to the Second Edition
Prologue Concerning Hobbits, and other matters
BOOK ONE
A Long-expected Party
21(20)
The Shadow of the Past
41(23)
Three is Company
64(20)
A Short Cut to Mushrooms
84(12)
A Conspiracy Unmasked
96(11)
The Old Forest
107(14)
In the House of Tom Bombadil
121(11)
Fog on the Barrow-downs
132(14)
At the Sign of The Prancing Pony
146(14)
Strider
160(12)
A Knife in the Dark
172(20)
Flight to the Ford
192(21)
BOOK TWO
Many Meetings
213(20)
The Council of Elrond
233(32)
The Ring Goes South
265(22)
A Journey in the Dark
287(26)
The Bridge of Khazad-dum
313(11)
Lothlorien
324(20)
The Mirror of Galadriel
344(14)
Farewell to Lorien
358(13)
The Great River
371(15)
The Breaking of the Fellowship
386

Excerpts

THE LORD OF THE RINGS THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING BOOK ONE Chapter 1 A Long-Expected Party When Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his eleventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence, there was much talk and excitement in Hobbiton. Bilbo was very rich and very peculiar, and had been the wonder of the Shire for sixty years, ever since his remarkable disappearance and unexpected return. The riches he had brought back from his travels had now become a local legend, and it was popularly believed, whatever the old folk might say, that the Hill at Bag End was full of tunnels stuffed with treasure. And if that was not enough for fame, there was also his prolonged vigour to marvel at. Time wore on, but it seemed to have little effect on Mr. Baggins. At ninety he was much the same as at fifty. At ninety-nine they began to call him well-preserved; but unchanged would have been nearer the mark. There were some that shook their heads and thought this was too much of a good thing; it seemed unfair that anyone should possess (apparently) perpetual youth as well as (reputedly) inexhaustible wealth. "It will have to be paid for," they said. "It isn"t natural, and trouble will come of it!" But so far trouble had not come; and as Mr. Baggins was generous with his money, most people were willing to forgive him his oddities and his good fortune. He remained on visiting terms with his relatives (except, of course, the Sackville-Bagginses), and he had many devoted admirers among the hobbits of poor and unimportant families. But he had no close friends, until some of his younger cousins began to grow up. The eldest of these, and Bilbo"s favourite, was young Frodo Baggins. When Bilbo was ninety-nine he adopted Frodo as his heir, and brought him to live at Bag End; and the hopes of the Sackville- Bagginses were finally dashed. Bilbo and Frodo happened to have the same birthday, September 22nd. "You had better come and live here, Frodo my lad," said Bilbo one day; "and then we can celebrate our birthday-parties comfortably together." At that time Frodo was still in his tweens, as the hobbits called the irresponsible twenties between childhood and coming of age at thirty-three. Twelve more years passed. Each year the Bagginses had given very lively combined birthday-parties at Bag End; but now it was understood that something quite exceptional was being planned for that autumn. Bilbo was going to be eleventy-one, 111, a rather curious number, and a very respectable age for a hobbit (the Old Took himself had only reached 130); and Frodo was going to be thirty- three, 33, an important number: the date of his "coming of age". Tongues began to wag in Hobbiton and Bywater; and rumour of the coming event travelled all over the Shire. The history and character of Mr. Bilbo Baggins became once again the chief topic of conversation; and the older folk suddenly found their reminiscences in welcome demand. No one had a more attentive audience than old Ham Gamgee, commonly known as the Gaffer. He held forth at The Ivy Bush, a small inn on the Bywater road; and he spoke with some authority, for he had tended the garden at Bag End for forty years, and had helped old Holman in the same job before that. Now that he was himself growing old and stiff in the joints, the job was mainly carried on by his youngest son, Sam Gamgee. Both father and son were on very friendly terms with Bilbo and Frodo. They lived on the Hill itself, in Number 3 Bagshot Row just below Bag End. "A very nice well-spoken gentlehobbit is Mr. Bilbo, as I"ve always said," the Gaffer declared. With perfect truth: for Bilbo was very poli

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