9780120577705

Handbook of Communication and Emotion

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  • ISBN13:

    9780120577705

  • ISBN10:

    0120577704

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1997-10-01
  • Publisher: Academic Pr
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Summary

Emotion is once again at the forefront of research in social psychology and personality. TheHandbook of Communication and Emotionprovides a comprehensive look at the questions and answers of interest in the field: How are specific emotions (fear, jealousy, anger, love) communicated? How does the effectiveness, or ineffectiveness, of this communication affect relationships? How is the communication of emotion utilized to deceive, or persuade, others? This important reference work is edited by top researchers in the field of communication and authored by a who's who in emotion and communication.

Table of Contents

Contributors xiii(3)
Acknowledgments xvi(1)
Foreword xvii
PART I Introduction 5(95)
1 Communication and Emotion: Basic Concepts and Approaches
5(25)
Laura K. Guerrero
Peter A. Andersen
Melanie R. Trost
Affect, Emotion, and Mood
5(4)
Emotional Experience versus Emotional Expression
9(1)
General Approaches to Conceptualizing Emotion
10(12)
Implications
22(1)
Conclusion
23(1)
References
24(6)
2 Communicating Emotion in Everyday Life: Cues, Channels, and Processes
30(19)
Sally Planalp
Research Literature on Emotion Messages
30(8)
Varieties of Cues in Everyday Life
38(4)
Darwin Revisited: Process and Adaptation
42(3)
References
45(4)
3. Principles of Communication and Emotion in Social Interaction
49(51)
Peter A. Andersen
Laura K. Guerrero
Principles of Communication and Emotion
49(1)
The Evolution of Emotional Communication
50(2)
The Socialization of Emotional Communication
52(5)
Interpersonal Elicitation of Emotions
57(7)
Interpersonal Schemata and Cognitive Processing
64(9)
Emotions as Interpersonal Communication
73(9)
Patterns of Mutual Influence
82(7)
Conclusion
89(1)
References
89(11)
PART II The "Dark Side" of Emotions 100(146)
4 Strategic Embarrassment: The Culprit of Emotion
100(24)
Lisa Bradford
Sandra Petronio
The Nature of Unintentional Embarrassment
100(3)
Strategic Embarrassment
103(2)
Model of Planned Strategic Embarrassment
105(12)
Conclusion
117(1)
References
118(6)
5 Guilt and Hurt: Similarities, Distinctions, and Conversational Strategies
124(32)
Anita L. Vangelisti
Rhonda J. Sprague
Comparing Guilt and Hurt
124(6)
Defining Characteristics of Guilt and Hurt
130(7)
The Elicitation of Guilt and Hurt
137(6)
Responses to Guilt and Hurt
143(1)
Directions for Future Study
144(5)
References
149(7)
6 Jealousy Experience and Expression in Romantic Relationships
156(35)
Laura K. Guerrero
Peter A. Andersen
Overview
156(2)
Antecedents of Jealousy Experience and Expression
158(9)
Cognitive and Emotional Components of Jealousy Experience
167(3)
Types, Functions, and Consequences of Communicative Responses to Jealousy
170(12)
Summary and Conclusion
182(1)
References
183(8)
7 The Experience and Expression of Anger in Interpersonal Settings
191(25)
Daniel J. Canary
Brian H. Spitzberg
Beth A. Semic
Anger in Interpersonal Settings
191(6)
Anger and Aggression
197(6)
Anger-Relevant Responses
203(5)
Conclusion
208(1)
References
209(7)
8 Interpersonal Communication Problems Associated with Depression and Loneliness
216(30)
Chris Segrin
Depression and Interpersonal Interaction
216(1)
Interpersonal Relationships and Reactions to Depression
217(4)
Social Skills Deficits Associated with Depression
221(6)
Loneliness and Interpersonal Interaction
227(4)
The Relationship between Depression and Loneliness
231(2)
Conclusion
233(1)
References
233(13)
PART III The "Bright Side" of Emotions 246(136)
9 How the Comforting Process Works: Alleviating Emotional Distress through Conversationally Induced Reappraisals
246(36)
Brant R. Burleson
Daena J. Goldsmith
Effective Forms of Comforting
246(7)
Emotion and Appraisal
253(5)
Appraisal Theory, Comforting, and Conversation
258(5)
Features of Conversations That Facilitate Reappraisal
263(10)
Conclusion
273(2)
References
275(7)
10 When a Friend Is in Need: Feelings about Seeking, Giving, and Receiving Social Support
282(23)
Anita P. Barbee
Tammy L. Rowatt
Michael R. Cunningham
Sensitive Interaction Systems Theory
282(2)
Seeker's Perspective
284(4)
Supporter Perspective
288(5)
Immediate Emotional Outcomes
293(1)
Long-Term Relationship Outcomes
294(4)
References
298(7)
11 The Bright Side of Relational Communication: Interpersonal Warmth as a Social Emotion
305(27)
Peter A. Andersen
Laura K. Guerrero
Interpersonal Warmth
305(1)
Multicomponential Constructs Related to Interpersonal Warmth
306(6)
Communicative Behaviors Related to Interpersonal Warmth
312(5)
The Acceptance of Interpersonally Warm Messages
317(6)
Conclusion
323(1)
References
324(8)
12 Loving and Liking
332(22)
Carolyn B. Taraban
Susan S. Hendrick
Clyde Hendrick
Loving and Liking as Emotions
332(1)
Liking
332(4)
Romantic Interest
336(5)
Love
341(6)
Conclusions
347(2)
References
349(5)
13 Communication and Sexual Desire
354(28)
Sandra Metts
Susan Sprecher
Pamela C. Regan
Conceptualizing Sexual Desire
354(4)
Biological or Reproductive Perspectives
358(2)
Relational Perspectives
360(10)
Conclusion
370(2)
References
372(10)
PART IV Applications and Contexts 382(189)
14 Emotional Expression in the Deception Process
382(22)
David B. Buller
Judee K. Burgoon
The Nature of Emotions and Emotional Expression
382(1)
Interpersonal Deception Theory
383(2)
Emotion as a Motivator of Deception
385(1)
Emotional Expression during Deceptive Episodes
386(8)
Interpreting Emotional Expression during Interpersonal Deception
394(3)
Summary
397(1)
References
398(6)
15 Affect, Persuasion, and Communication Processes
404(20)
Peter F. Jorgensen
Definitional Issues and General Background
404(5)
Emotion and Persuasion: Explanatory Frameworks
409(3)
Models of "Message-Irrelevant" Effects
412(2)
The Communication of Emotions
414(2)
Directions for Future Research
416(2)
Conclusion
418(1)
References
418(6)
16 Fear as Motivator, Fear as Inhibitor: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Explain Fear Appeal Successes and Failures
424(28)
Kim Witte
The Nature of Fear
424(1)
Historical Origins of Fear Appeals
424(4)
The Extended Parallel Process Model
428(12)
Distinguishing the Extended Parallel Process Model from Other Fear Appeal Models
440(2)
Research on the Extended Parallel Process Model to Date
442(4)
Future Directions
446(1)
Conclusion
447(1)
References
448(4)
17 Cultural Influences on Emotional Expression: Implications for Intercultural Communication
452(1)
Richard E. Porter
Larry A. Samovar
The Nature of Emotions
452(1)
The Influence of Culture on Emotional Expression and Recognition
452(4)
Cultural Dynamics Affecting Emotion
456(12)
Summary and Conclusion
468(1)
References
469(5)
18 Emotion, Attachment, and Satisfaction in Close Relationships
474(36)
Judith A. Feeney
Patricia Noller
Nigel Roberts
General Theories of Emotion in Close Relationships
474(1)
Emotion and Relationship Satisfaction
475(8)
Attachment Style and Emotion
483(3)
Attachment Style, Emotion, and Relationship Satisfaction
486(1)
Study 1: Attachment Style and Emotional Control
487(3)
Study 2: Attachment and the Experience of Affect during Marital Conflict
490(9)
General Discussion
499(2)
References
501(9)
19 Communication of Emotions in Friendships
510(24)
Stanley O. Gaines, Jr., et al.
Communication of Primary Emotions in Friendships
510(4)
Communication of Mixed Emotions in Friendships
514(5)
Reconsidering the Acceptance-Disgust Dichotomy in Plutchik's Model
519(2)
Dialectics within Plutchik's Model
521(1)
Theoretical Implications
522(2)
Summary and Concluding Thoughts
524(2)
References
526(8)
20 Children's Responses to Emotional Portrayals on Television
534(37)
Barbara J. Wilson
Stacy L. Smith
Developmental Differences in Children's Processing of Television
534(3)
Understanding Emotional Portrayals on Television
537(2)
Learning about Emotions from Television
539(3)
Emotional Reactions to Television
542(12)
Affective Socialization
554(4)
Summary and Implications
558(3)
References
561(10)
Index 571

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