9780721692975

Health Professional and Patient Interaction

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780721692975

  • ISBN10:

    0721692974

  • Edition: 6th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2002-02-19
  • Publisher: Saunders
  • View Upgraded Edition

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Revised and updated, the sixth edition of this comprehensive resource focuses on respectful interactions in a health care setting. Emphasizing effective communication with clients and patients, examples and scenarios are specifically relevant to health professionals. Content includes information and strategies for patients of all ages -- as well as abusive, depressed, and impaired patients. Clinically relevant format is easy to understand. Examples are included from a variety of allied heath professions and are easily transferred to real-life experiences. Scenarios facilitate thought-provoking classroom discussion. Content emphasizes a respect for diversity to guide readers through potential difficulties. Content has been thoroughly updated to include current health care settings, trends, and approaches. Two new chapters have been added - The Patient's Story and Some New Challenges. New boxes and illustrations have been included to make the text more reader-friendly. New Verbal Interactions quotes are included at the beginning of each chapter. Discussion questions are now located within chapter content to aid in comprehension. Respect is the text's on-going theme. Examples and case scenarios throughout the text emphasize this critical aspect of patient communication.

Table of Contents

PART ONE Creating a Context of Respect 1(60)
Respect: The Difference It Makes
3(16)
What is Respect?
4(1)
Respect and Your Values
5(8)
Personal Values
7(2)
Professional Values
9(2)
Societal Values
11(2)
The ``Good Life'' and You
13(2)
Respect for Values: Yours and Others'
15(2)
Honoring that Values Change
16(1)
Reclaiming and Replacing Values
16(1)
Summary
17(2)
Respect in the Institutional Settings of Health Care
19(16)
The Functional Organization of Health Care
21(1)
Characteristics of Institutional Relationships
22(3)
Public- and Private-Sector Relationships
23(1)
Total and Partial Institutions
23(2)
The Interface of Institutions and Society
25(4)
Laws and Policies Maintaining High Standards of Competence
25(2)
Laws and Policies Related to Discrimination
27(1)
Other Laws and Policies
27(1)
Laws, Policies, and Change
28(1)
Rights, Responsibilities, and the Work Environment
29(1)
Patients' Rights Documents
29(1)
Grievance Mechanisms
30(1)
Informed Consent: The Basic Contract Guiding Interaction
30(3)
Disclosure of Relevant Information
30(1)
Giving or Refusing Consent
31(2)
Summary
33(2)
Respect in a Diverse Society
35(26)
Bias, Prejudice, and Discrimination
36(2)
Respecting Differences
38(12)
Race
40(1)
Gender
41(2)
Age
43(1)
Ethnicity
43(2)
Socioeconomic Status
45(2)
Occupation and Place of Residence
47(1)
Health Status
48(1)
Religion
49(1)
Sexual Orientation
49(1)
Cultural Sensitivity and Competence
50(2)
Summary
52(3)
Appendix 3-1 Introduction to the Berg Cultural/Spiritual Assessment Tool
55(5)
Part One Questions for Thought and Discussion
60(1)
PART TWO Respect for Yourself 61(46)
Respect for Yourself as a Student
63(14)
How the Desire to Help Will Help You
64(1)
How Do I Become an Expert?
64(5)
Knowledge (Theoretical Concepts)
65(1)
Skills
66(2)
Attitudes and Character
68(1)
On-Site Education: New Challenges
69(2)
Critical Thinking: An Essential Tool
71(1)
The Art of Critical Thinking
71(1)
Psychological Factors in Critical Thinking
72(1)
Finding Meaning in the Student Role
72(3)
Why Do I Feel Anxious?
73(1)
How Can I Respond Constructively to Anxiety?
74(1)
Reaping the Rewards of Preseverance
75(1)
Summary
75(2)
Respect for Yourself in Your Professional Capacity
77(12)
Developing Your Capacity to Help
78(5)
Intimate versus Personal Help
78(1)
Social Helping Relationships
79(1)
Therapeutic Helping Relationships
80(3)
Being an Expert Helper
83(1)
Shared Responsibility for Optimal Care
84(2)
What about Working with Assistants?
84(1)
When Should I Refer Patients to Other Professionals?
85(1)
Teams and Teamwork
86(1)
Self-Respect and Lifelong Learning Habits
87(1)
Summary
87(2)
Enhancing Self-Respect through Good Personal Habits
89(18)
Self-Respect through Nurturing Yourself
90(8)
Overcoming Illusions of Invulnerability
91(1)
Adopting Generative Approaches to Professional Tasks
92(4)
Respect for Your Need for Solitude
96(2)
Showing Respect for Each Other
98(4)
The Ties That Bind
99(1)
Finding Mechanisms That Support Support
100(1)
Play:Enjoying Each Other's Company
101(1)
Summary
102(2)
Part Two Questions for Thought and Discussion
104(3)
PART THREE Respect for the Patient's Situation 107(34)
Challenges to Patients
109(18)
Maintaining Wellness
110(1)
Reckoning with Change
110(3)
Loss of Former Self-Image
111(2)
Special Challenges of Inpatients
113(5)
Losses Associated with Institutional Life
114(3)
Loss of Independence
117(1)
Special Challenges of Ambulatory Settings
118(1)
Special Challenges of the Home Care Patient
119(1)
Weighing Losses and Privileges
120(2)
Some Advantages of Remaining in the Patient Role
122(2)
Escape
122(1)
Financial Gain
122(1)
Social Gain
123(1)
Respectful Responses to Malingering
124(1)
Summary
125(2)
Respect for the Patient's Personal Relationships
127(14)
Facing the Fragility of Relationships
127(4)
``Will Others Lose Interest?''
128(2)
``Will We Weather the Winds of Change?''
130(1)
Abiding Uncertainty
131(2)
Fighting Stigma
133(2)
Discovering Values: Old and New
135(3)
Religious Values and Practices
135(2)
Paying for Care
137(1)
Summary
138(1)
Part Three Questions for Thought and Discussion
139(2)
PART FOUR Respect through Communication 141(46)
The Patient's Story
143(14)
Who's Telling the Story?
144(3)
The Patient's Story
145(1)
The Medical Record
145(2)
Awareness of Literary Form in Your Communication
147(2)
Narrative Language is Not Transparent
147(1)
Language Creates Reality
148(1)
Contributions of Narrative to Respectful Interaction
149(5)
Literary Tools
149(1)
Poetry
150(1)
Short Stories
151(2)
Illness Stories/Pathographies
153(1)
Where the Stories Intersect
154(1)
Summary
154(3)
Respectful Communication in an Information Age
157(30)
Talking Together
158(1)
Models of Communication
159(1)
The Context of Communication
160(4)
Face to Face or Distant
161(1)
One-to-One or Group
161(2)
Institution or Home
163(1)
Choosing the Right Words
164(5)
Vocabulary and Jargon
164(2)
Problems from Miscommunication
166(1)
Clarity
167(1)
Tone and Volume
168(1)
Choosing the Way to Say It
169(3)
Attitudes
170(2)
Communicating Beyond Words
172(6)
Facial Expression
172(1)
Gestures and Body Language
173(1)
Physical Appearance
174(1)
Touch
174(1)
Proxemics
175(2)
Differing Concepts of Time
177(1)
Communicating Across Distances
178(3)
Written Tools
179(1)
Voice and Electronic Tools
180(1)
Effective Listening
181(3)
Summary
184(1)
Part Four Questions for Thought and Discussion
185(2)
PART FIVE Components of Respectful Interaction 187(50)
Professional Relatedness Built on Respect
189(18)
Build Trust by Being Trustworthy
190(5)
Building Trust within Different Models of Relationship
191(1)
Reassurance and Trust
192(3)
Tease Out Transference and Countertransference
195(1)
Recognize the Difference: From Casualness to Professional Caring
196(4)
Caring as Attitude and Behavior
198(1)
Caring---from the Patient's Perspective
199(1)
It (Almost) All Depends on Dependence
200(3)
Types of Dependence
200(3)
Respect as Empowerment
203(1)
Summary
204(3)
Professional Boundaries Guided by Respect
207(16)
What is a Professional Boundary?
208(2)
Recognizing What a Meaningful Distance Is
210(1)
Physical Boundaries
211(3)
Unconsented Touching
211(2)
What About Dual Relationships?
213(1)
Psychological-Emotional Boundaries
214(5)
Pity
214(2)
Overidentification
216(1)
Caring Too Much
217(2)
Maintaining Boundaries for Good
219(2)
Summary
221(2)
Professional Closeness: Respect at Its Best
223(14)
Integrity in Words and Conduct
224(1)
Paying Close Attention to this Person
225(2)
Little Things Mean a Lot
227(2)
Personal-Hygiene Detail
228(1)
Personal-Comfort Detail
228(1)
Personal-Interest Detail
229(1)
Expanding-Awareness Detail
229(1)
Reality Testing as a Form of Respect
229(2)
Finding a Comfortable Level of Intimacy
231(2)
Summary
233(1)
Part Five Questions for Thought and Discussion
234(3)
PART SIX Respectful Interaction: Working with Patients Effectively 237(72)
Respectful Interaction: Working with Newborns, Infants, and Toddlers
239(18)
Human Development and Family
240(9)
Family: An Evolving Concept
241(5)
Useful Principles of Human Growth and Development
246(1)
Theories of Human Development to Guide You
247(2)
From Newborn to Infant
249(1)
The Normal Newborn
249(1)
Life-Threatening Circumstances
249(1)
Moving into Infancy
250(1)
Infant Needs: Respect and Consistency
250(2)
Everday Needs of Infants
251(1)
The Toddler: Becoming a ``Self''
252(1)
Toddler Needs: Respect and Security
253(1)
Summary
254(3)
Respectful Interaction: Working with the Child and Adolescent
257(12)
The Childhood Self
258(1)
Needs: Respect and Relating
258(5)
Play and Toys
259(1)
School Issues
259(1)
Family---A Bridge to Respectful Interaction
260(3)
The Adolescent Self
263(1)
Early and Late Adolescence
263(1)
Needs: Respect, Autonomy, and Relating
264(2)
Family and Peers---Bridges to Respectful Interaction
265(1)
Summary
266(3)
Respectful Interaction: Working with the Adult
269(20)
Who is the Adult?
269(1)
Needs: Respect, Identity, and Intimacy
270(14)
Psychosocial Development and Needs
272(2)
Social Roles in the Middle Years
274(2)
Work as Meaningful Activity
276(3)
Biological Development during the Adult Years
279(1)
Stresses and Challenges of Midlife
280(3)
Doubt at the Crossroads and Midlife Crisis
283(1)
Working with the Patient of Middle Years
284(1)
Summary
285(4)
Respectful Interaction: Working with the Older Adult
289(20)
Views of Aging
291(1)
Antithesis of Health and Vigor
291(1)
Unwelcome Reminder of Mortality
291(1)
Underprivileged Citizens
291(1)
Aging as a Clinical Entity
292(1)
Older People as a Cultural Treasure
292(1)
Needs: Respect and Integrity
292(6)
The Psychology of Aging
293(1)
Friendship and Family Ties
294(4)
Where ``Home'' Is
298(1)
The Challenge of Changes of Aging
298(5)
Challenge to Former Self-Image
298(3)
Physical Changes Characteristic of Aging
301(1)
Mental Changes Characteristic of Aging
302(1)
Interacting with Cognitively Imparied Older People
303(2)
Assessing a Patient's Value System
305(1)
Summary
305(2)
Part Six Questions for Thought and Discussion
307(2)
PART SEVEN Some Special Challenges 309(46)
Respectful Interaction When the Patient is Dying
311(26)
Dying and Death in Modern Society
312(5)
Dying: Denial and Beyond Denial
314(3)
Responses Associated with Dying and Death
317(6)
Fears of Dying
317(2)
Fear of Death Itself
319(2)
Other Responses
321(1)
Responses of the Patient's Family
322(1)
Setting Treatment Priorities
323(6)
Information Sharing
323(2)
The What and How of Telling
325(1)
Treating Losses and Fears
326(2)
Helping Patients Maintain Hope
328(1)
Providing the Right Treatment at the Right Time in the Right Place
329(3)
Hospice and Home Care Alternatives
329(1)
The Appropriate Treatment: Cure or Comfort?
330(2)
When Death is Imminent
332(2)
Maximizing Comfort
332(1)
Saying Good-Bye
333(1)
Accepting Rejection
334(1)
Summary
334(3)
Respectful Interaction in Other Difficult Situations
337(18)
Sources of Difficulties in the Health Professional and Patient Interaction
338(8)
Sources within the Health Professional
338(4)
Sources within Patients
342(1)
Sources in the Environment
342(4)
Difficult Health Professional and Patient Relationships
346(3)
The Aggressive Patient
346(1)
The Self-Destructive Patient
347(2)
Showing Respect in Difficult Situations
349(2)
Summary
351(1)
Part Seven Questions For Thought and Discussion
352(3)
Index 355

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