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9780582319943

Historical Sociolinguistics

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780582319943

  • ISBN10:

    0582319943

  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 2003-03-05
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

This volume presents a sociolinguistic perspective on the history of the English language. Based on original empirical research, it discusses the social factors that promoted linguistic changes in earlier English, and the people who were the leading force behind them. The authors focus on the major grammatical developments that shaped the language in Tudor and Stuart times, the period that laid the foundations for modern Standard English. Nevalainen and Raumolin-Brunberg adopt an interdisciplinary approach, exploring the extent to which sociolinguistic models and methods can be applied to the history of English.

Author Biography

Terttu Nevalainen

was appointed Associate Professor at the Department of English, University of Helsinki, in 1993 and full Professor of English Philology at the same department in 1997. Her research interests include phonetics and English historical lexicology, but the new discipline she has actively developed and worked on, together with Helena Raumolin-Brunberg, over the last ten years is historical sociolinguistics.

Helena Raumolin-Brunberg, after a period as acting Associate Professor of English at the Department of Translation Studies, University of Helsinki, (1989-1992), has devoted her time to research on historical sociolinguistics.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
List of Tables
xi
List of Figures
xiii
Publisher's Acknowledgements xvi
Introduction: Issues in Historical Sociolinguistics
1(15)
Sociolinguistic Backprojection?
2(4)
Contemporary Perceptions of Usage
6(2)
Sociohistorical Reconstruction
8(3)
Research Topics
11(5)
Sociolinguistic Paradigms and Language Change
16(10)
Sociolinguistic Paradigms
17(1)
Descriptions and Explanations
18(3)
Theoretical Pluralism
21(1)
Theory in Historical Sociolinguistics
22(4)
Primary Data: Background and Informants
26(27)
Data in Historical Sociolinguistics
26(2)
Generic and Temporal Concerns
28(2)
Tudor and Stuart England
30(13)
The Corpus of Early English Correspondence (CEEC)
43(10)
Real Time
53(30)
The S-Shaped Curve
53(3)
Timing Linguistic Changes
56(1)
Previous Studies
57(1)
The Time Courses of Fourteen Changes
58(20)
Conclusion
78(5)
Apparent Time
83(27)
Ongoing Change in Relation to Age
83(2)
Apparent Time in Historical Research
85(1)
Previous Studies
86(1)
Age Cohorts and Individual Participation in Ongoing Changes
86(12)
Conclusion
98(12)
Appendix 5.1. The informants for Figure 5.1. Subject You vs. Ye
101(3)
Appendix 5.2. Informants for Figure 5.2. 3rd sg -s vs. -TH
104(3)
Appendix 5.3. Informants for Figure 5.3. Which vs. The Which
107(3)
Gender
110(23)
The Gender Paradox
110(3)
Historical Reconstruction
113(3)
Previous Studies
116(2)
Gender and Real-Time Linguistic Change
118(12)
Conclusion
130(3)
Social Stratification
133(24)
Social Order in Sociolinguistics
133(3)
Reconstructing Social Order
136(2)
Previous Studies
138(1)
Social Order in Language Change
139(14)
Conclusion
153(4)
Regional Variation
157(28)
Regional Dialects in England Today
157(2)
Reconstructing Regional Differences in Tudor and Stuart England
159(8)
Previous Empirical Studies
167(3)
Regional Variation in Late Middle and Early Modern English
170(11)
Conclusion
181(4)
Historical Patterning of Sociolinguistic Variation
185(17)
Modelling Variability
185(4)
Modelling Sociolinguistic Variation Historically
189(3)
Previous Empirical Studies
192(1)
Varbrul Analyses of Five Historical Changes
193(5)
Summary and Conclusions
198(4)
Conclusion
202(12)
The Changes in Retrospect
203(5)
The Principle of Contingency
208(2)
Uninterrupted Continuity of Change?
210(4)
Appendix I: Methodology: How to Count Occurrences 214(4)
Appendix II: Numerical Information 218(5)
Appendix III: The Letter Collections 223(12)
References 235(19)
Author Index 254(4)
Subject Index 258

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