9780898754223

The Horse in Blackfoot Indian Culture: With Comparative Material from Other Western Tribes

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780898754223

  • ISBN10:

    0898754224

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-06-01
  • Publisher: Lightning Source Inc

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $49.99 Save up to $5.00
  • Rent Book $44.99
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE
    USUALLY SHIPS IN 3-5 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Much of the factual information on which this study is based was supplied by elderly, fullblood Piegan and Blood Indian informants, whose knowledge of the functions of horses in the late years of buffalo days was solidly grounded in personal experiences. These old people really loved horses and enjoyed talking about them. They were uniformly cooperative and interested in getting the record straight.

Table of Contents

Foreword xi
The acquisition of the horse
1(19)
The northward spread of horses
2(5)
Sources of the horses of the Plains Indians
2(1)
Dating the northward spread of horses among the Indians
3(4)
The process of diffusion
7(8)
Acquisition of horses by the Blackfoot
15(5)
Wealth in horses
20(13)
Blackfoot tribal wealth in horses
20(2)
Wealth in horses of other Plains and Plateau tribes
22(6)
Horse wealth of individual Blackfoot Indians
28(3)
Horse wealth of individuals in other tribes
31(2)
Care of horses
33(20)
The Indian pony
33(2)
Fate of the Indian pony
34(1)
Means of identification
35(2)
Daily care of horses
37(1)
Hobbling
38(1)
Picketing
39(1)
Pasturage
40(2)
Winter care
42(4)
Rustling
42(1)
Supplemental winter horse food
43(1)
Night care
44(1)
Winter losses of horses
44(1)
May storms
45(1)
Spring condition
46(1)
Common horse remedies
46(4)
Treatment of saddle sores
47(1)
Treatment of sore feet
47(1)
Treatment of colic and distemper
48(1)
Precautions against chills
49(1)
A general tonic
49(1)
Treatment of broken bones
49(1)
Treatment of unknown illnesses
50(1)
Losses of horses
50(1)
Losses from disease
50(1)
Losses from animal predators
51(1)
Losses from stock-poisoning plants
51(1)
Care of old horses
51(2)
Horse breeding
53(6)
Important role of horse breeding
53(1)
Selection of studs
53(1)
Maintenance of color lines
54(1)
Magical breeding formulas
55(1)
Care of gravid mares and colts
56(1)
Gelding
56(3)
Training of horses and riders
59(14)
Capture of wild horses
59(1)
Breaking horses for riding
60(4)
Pond or stream breaking
61(1)
Boggy ground breaking
62(1)
Surcingle breaking
62(2)
Pad-saddle breaking
64(1)
Breaking horses for the travois
64(1)
Teaching children to ride
65(3)
Riding and guiding
68(5)
Mounting
68(1)
Horse commands
69(1)
Guiding
70(1)
Use of whip
70(1)
Use of short stirrups
70(1)
Ability as horsemen
71(2)
Riding gear
73(29)
Making of rawhide rope
73(1)
Hackamores
74(1)
Bridles
75(4)
Comparative data on bridles
78(1)
Lariats
79(1)
The dragging line
80(1)
Saddles
81(13)
Saddle making
81(1)
The pad saddle
81(2)
Distribution of the pad saddle
83(2)
Pad saddle variants among the Blackfoot
85(1)
The ``wood saddle''
85(4)
Distribution of the ``wood saddle''
89(2)
The ``prairie chicken snare saddle''
91(1)
Distribution of the ``prairie chicken snare saddle''
92(1)
Stirrups
93(1)
Use of white men's saddles and accessories
93(1)
Saddle blankets
94(1)
Saddle housings
95(1)
Martingales and cruppers
95(2)
Whips
97(2)
Horse decoration
99(3)
Head ornaments
99(1)
Body paint
100(1)
Mane and tail ornaments
100(1)
Decoration of women's horses
101(1)
The travois and transport gear
102(19)
The horse travois
102(5)
Horse travois construction
103(2)
Travois accessories
105(1)
Travois adjustment and repair
105(1)
Care of the travois in camp
106(1)
Survival of the horse travois
106(1)
The lodgepole hitch
107(5)
Distribution of the travois and methods of pole transport
108(4)
Principal items of luggage carried by pack animals
112(5)
The parfleche
112(2)
Antiquity of the parfleche
114(2)
The double-bag
116(1)
Principal items of luggage transported by riding horses
117(4)
The double saddlebag
117(2)
Rectangular rawhide saddlebags
119(1)
Cylindrical rawhide saddlebags
119(2)
The horse in camp movements
121(27)
The Blackfoot Country
121(2)
The Blackfoot yearly round
123(6)
The winter camp
124(2)
Spring hunting and collecting season
126(1)
Summer hunting and Sun Dance season
127(1)
Fall hunting and collecting season
128(1)
Movement of a Blackfoot band camp
129(19)
Preparation for movement
129(1)
Packing up
130(1)
Packing the lodge
131(3)
Packing household furniture
134(1)
Packing food
135(1)
Clothing
136(1)
Household utensils
136(1)
Society and medicine paraphernalia
136(1)
Weapons
137(1)
Children
137(1)
Weights and loads
138(1)
Horse needs for the average family
138(1)
Moving camp on the part of a wealthy family
139(1)
Moving camp on the part of a poor family
140(1)
Comparative data on the poor in horses
141(2)
Formations on the march
143(1)
The noon stop for lunch
144(1)
Crossing streams en route
144(1)
Stops en route because of rain
145(1)
Arrival at night camp
145(1)
Making camp without wood or water
146(1)
Distances traveled per day
147(1)
The horse in hunting
148(23)
Buffalo in the Blackfoot Country
148(1)
Blackfoot uses of the buffalo
149(3)
Buffalo hunting seasons
152(1)
The buffalo horse
153(1)
Methods of buffalo hunting on horseback
154(1)
The buffalo chase on horseback
155(16)
Preparations
155(1)
Equipment
156(1)
The approach
157(1)
The run
157(1)
Number of buffalo killed in a single chase
158(1)
Boys' hunting of buffalo calves
159(1)
Hunting accidents
159(1)
Butchering and packing
160(1)
Loaning of buffalo horses for hunting
161(1)
Feeding the poor
162(1)
Regulation of the summer buffalo hunt
163(1)
Early winter buffalo drives
164(2)
Winter hunting on horseback
166(1)
The winter hunting horse
166(1)
Winter hunting on foot
166(1)
Food rationing
167(1)
Meat consumption of the Blackfoot
168(1)
Improvident food habits of other Plains tribes
169(1)
Hunting of other mammals on horseback
170(1)
The horse in war
171(45)
Brief history of Blackfoot intertribal warfare
171(2)
The horse as a cause of intertribal conflicts
173(3)
The horse raid
176(15)
Tribal preferences of Blackfoot horse raiders
176(1)
Organization of the horse raid
177(1)
Preparations
177(1)
War medicines
178(3)
Clothing
181(2)
Weapons
183(1)
The pack
184(1)
Food
184(1)
The outward journey
184(2)
The attack
186(1)
The homeward journey
187(1)
Distribution of captured horses
188(1)
Return to camp
189(1)
Accustoming captured horses to one's herd
189(1)
Women on horse-raiding expeditions
190(1)
Boys on horse-raiding expeditions
190(1)
Frequency of horse raids
191(1)
White Quiver, the most successful Blackfoot horse raider
191(3)
The raid for scalps
194(13)
The riding big dance
196(1)
The war horse
196(1)
Equipment: clothing
197(1)
Tactics in mounted warfare
198(1)
Use of fire weapons
199(1)
Use of shock weapons
200(2)
The shield
202(1)
Early use of protective armor
203(2)
Use of the horse as a shield
205(1)
Postraid ceremonies
206(1)
Defensive warfare
207(5)
Defense of the camp
207(1)
The individual lodge watch
208(1)
The horse corral
209(1)
The ambush
210(1)
Ownership of horses recovered from the enemy
210(1)
Defensive warfare in the field
211(1)
Influence of warfare on Blackfoot population
212(1)
War honors
212(2)
Pictographic representation of war honors
214(1)
The Blackfoot warrior ideal
214(2)
The horse in trade
216(9)
Intertribal trade
216(1)
Intratribal trade
217(1)
The horse as a standard of value
217(1)
Judgment of horses
218(1)
Examples of horse values in intratribal trade
218(3)
Horse values in buffalo robes
218(1)
Horse values in weapons
219(1)
Horse values in articles of men's clothing
219(1)
Horse values in articles of women's clothing
220(1)
Horse-pipe relative values
220(1)
Horse payments in transfer of ceremonial paraphernalia
220(1)
Blackfoot uses of horse materials
221(4)
The horse as food
222(1)
Use of horsehide
222(1)
Use of horsehair
223(1)
Horse-chestnut perfume
223(1)
Horse-tooth necklaces
223(1)
Use of horse hoofs
223(1)
Use of horse manure
224(1)
The horse in recreation
225(15)
The horse in children's play
225(2)
Horse racing
227(9)
Race horses
228(1)
Intratribal and intertribal horse races
228(1)
Intersociety races
229(4)
Horse races between Blackfoot tribes
233(1)
Other intertribal horse races in which Blackfoot participated
233(1)
Later history of Blackfoot horse racing
234(1)
Horse racing among other Plains and Plateau tribes
235(1)
Horse symbolism in intersociety hoop and pole games
236(2)
Sham battles
238(1)
Horses as stakes in gambling
239(1)
The horse as a factor in social relations
240(17)
Social status
240(5)
The rich
240(2)
The middle class
242(1)
The poor
243(1)
Changes in social status
244(1)
Political organization
245(4)
The band
245(3)
Tribal chieftaincy
248(1)
Marriage
249(2)
Polygamy
250(1)
The horse in punishment of civil and criminal offenses
251(2)
The horse in society organization and ceremonies
253(1)
Personal names
254(1)
Horses as gifts
255(2)
The horse in religion
257(42)
The horse medicine cult
257(27)
Origin and history of the Piegan horse medicine cult
258(4)
Transfer of horse medicine power
262(1)
The horse dance: ceremony of the horse medicine men
263(7)
Uses of horse medicine
270(4)
Taboos recognized by horse medicine men
274(1)
Identification of horse medicines
275(1)
Comparative data on horse-medicine identification
276(1)
Relationship of horse medicine to other Blackfoot medicines
277(2)
The South Piegan Black Horse Society
279(1)
Evidences of the horse medicine cult among other tribes
279(5)
Sacrifice of horses after the death of their owners
284(3)
Comparative data on horses as grave escorts
286(1)
Disposal of horses after the death of owner
287(1)
Secondary associations of the horse in Blackfoot religion
288(2)
In bundle transfers
288(1)
In the Sun Dance ceremony
289(1)
Beliefs concerning the supernatural powers of horses
290(1)
Beliefs regarding the origin of horses
291(8)
Thunder's gift of horses
291(3)
Water Spirit's gift of horses
294(1)
How Morning Star made the first horse
295(4)
The influence of the horse on Blackfoot culture
299(24)
The pre-horse Blackfoot Indians
299(1)
Horse acquisition as a stimulus to cultural innovation
300(2)
Influence on hunting
302(4)
Influence on camp movements and possessions
306(3)
Influence on warfare
309(3)
Influence on trade
312(1)
Influence on recreation
313(1)
Influence on social life
314(2)
Influence on religion
316(2)
The horse and the fur trade
318(2)
Survivals
320(3)
The Plains Indian horse complex
323(18)
Elements in the horse complex of the Plains Indians
323(4)
Origins of the Plains Indian horse complex
327(4)
The horse complex in Plains Indian history
331(5)
The natural and cultural setting
331(1)
Period of diffusion and integration
332(3)
Period of crystallization and maximum utilization
335(1)
Period of disintegration
336(1)
Old theories and new interpretations
336(5)
Appendix. Use of mules 341(2)
Bibliography 343(16)
Index 359

Rewards Program

Write a Review