9781891661181

How to Speak Shakespeare

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781891661181

  • ISBN10:

    1891661183

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-09-01
  • Publisher: Santa Monica Press

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

This classroom and theater-tested program teaches amateur and professional actors alike how to understand and effectively communicate the poetry of Shakespeare. Organized around passages from Romeo and Juliet, a simple, three-step process is presented. In the first step, Test Your Understanding, readers learn the value of looking up words in the Oxford English Dictionary and paraphrase passages to ensure that they truly understand the words they are speaking. The second step, Stress for Meaning, presents essential tools for speaking Shakespeare effectively, including iambic pentameter and correct rhythm, and explains how to syncopate for meaning. The final step, Celebrate the Poetry, honors the poetry of Shakespeare through a discussion of the use of punctuation, repeated sounds, and connecting key words and phrases. Exercises bring all the elements of these steps together.

Author Biography

Cal Pritner has chaired theatre departments at Illinois State University and the University of Missouri–Kansas City, and served as the founding artistic director of the Illinois Shakespeare Festival. He lives in New York City. Louis Colaianni is an associate professor at the University of Missouri–Kansas City and has served on the faculties of the American Conservatory Theatre, Ohio University, and Hunter College, among others. He lives in Kansas City, Missouri.

Table of Contents

Foreword 11(2)
Introduction 13(1)
The Basic Sequence
13(2)
Test Your Understanding
Stress for Meaning
Celebrate the Poetry
What Shakespeare Do We Use?
15(4)
What is a ``quarto''? What is a ``folio''? Chorus
Test Your Understanding
19(10)
Word Meanings
19(4)
Example: ``Dignitie''
Example: ``Where''
Archaic Words and Forms of Words
What Have We Learned?
Exercise: Paraphrase
23(4)
Our Paraphrase
Oral Exercise: Meaning and Communication
27(2)
Stress for Meaning
29(22)
Iambic Pentameter: The Basic Rhythm
29(4)
A Crash Course in Syllable Stress Contracted Words
33(2)
A Central Concept: Syncopate for Meaning
35(2)
Oral Exercise: Regular vs. Syncopated
37(2)
Verbs: They Power Ideas Refresher Course in the Verb ``To Be'' Some Other Unstressed Verbs
39(2)
A Mark-Up System: Underline to Syncopate, Part One
41(2)
Oral Exercise: Emphasize the Verbs
43(1)
Nouns: They are the Namers Refresher Course in Nouns
44(1)
A Mark-Up System: Underline to Syncopate, Part Two
45(2)
Oral Exercise: Verbs and Nouns
47(1)
Knowing When to Break the Rules
48(3)
Celebrate the Poetry
51(16)
Use the Punctuation
52(4)
Oral Exercise: Punctuation
56(2)
Repeated Sounds
58(3)
Oral Exercise: Shakespeare's Verse
61(2)
Connecting the Key Words and Phrases
63(1)
Oral Exercise: Make the Connection
64(3)
LET'S REVIEW 67(8)
Exercise: Your Mark-Up Our Mark-Up
68(4)
Oral Exercise: Communicate for Meaning
72(1)
Make Informed Choices
73(2)
BEFORE WE BRING IT ALL TOGETHER 75(24)
Coining and Borrowing
79(1)
Contracted Sounds
80(3)
Adding a Syllable, Part One: Completing a Line of Verse
83(1)
Adding a Syllable, Part Two: The ``Feminine'' Ending
84(2)
Oral Exercise: ``Feminine'' Endings
86(1)
Adding a Syllable, Part Three: The ``ed'' Suffix
87(2)
Oral Exercise: Contractions and Elongations
89(1)
Unstressed ``Not''
90(1)
Broken/Shared Lines Which Indicate a Pause or Stage Direction
91(1)
Broken/Shared Lines Which Indicate a Quick Cue Pick-Up
92(1)
Bracketed Stage Directions
93(1)
Implied Stage Directions
94(5)
APPLYING THE THREE STEPS TO A SCENE 99(20)
Test Your Understanding
99(3)
Word Meanings
Paraphrase
Exercise: Your Paraphrase Our Paraphrase
102(6)
Oral Exercise: Be Intelligent
108(1)
Stress for Meaning
109(1)
Celebrate the Poetry
110(1)
Exercise: Your Mark-Up Our Mark-Up
111(7)
Oral Exercise: Bringing It All Together
118(1)
ACTING THE TEXT: SHAKESPEARE'S DEMANDS 119(10)
The Technical and the Creative
120(1)
Stimulus-Response-Stimulus (S/R/S)
121(1)
S/R/S and the ``Balcony Scene''
122(6)
Where Have We Been? What Have We Done?
128(1)
SOME ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS ON ACTING SHAKESPEARE 129(10)
Pronunciation
132(2)
Spelling Spelling and the Actor
134(5)
Selective Bibliography 139

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