9780898625967

Hyperactive Children Grown Up, Second Edition ADHD in Children, Adolescents, and Adults

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780898625967

  • ISBN10:

    0898625963

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1993-05-14
  • Publisher: The Guilford Press

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Summary

This second edition of a classic volume demonstrates that fifty percent of hyperactive children continue to face problems of impulsivity, restlessness, low self-esteem, and social skill deficits when they become adults. Providing a complete developmental analysis of the symptoms evinced from infancy through adolescence, the authors show how the disorder is manifested and what happens during treatment at different ages. The authors attempt to distinguish patterns that can be linked to early hyperactivity and examine predictive factoRs related to adult outcome. Clinical vignettes present psychotherapy sessions with children and a poignant rendering of one individual's experience of growing up hyperactive. The new section of the second edition begins with a postscript by this same individual where he relays how he has met the various challenges posed by ADHD. This section also contains a summary of recent research on genetic transmission, neurobiological aspects, and the importance of coexistance of other conditions in ADHD. An extensive update of the treatment for both children and adults has been added to the second edition to present a summary of recent findings regarding the use of medications and various psychosocial treatments.

Author Biography

Gabrielle Weiss, M.D., F.R.C.P. is a Professor of Psychiatry at McGill University, a staff psychiatrist at the Montreal Children's Hospital, and a consultant to the British Columbia Children's Hospital. She is currently the President of the Canadian Academy of Child Psychiatry. Dr. Weiss has 30 years of clinical experience with children who have ADHD and their parents.

Table of Contents

I. OVERVIEW
Overview of Childhood Syndrome
3(18)
Historical Background and Terminology
3(4)
Current Research Interest in the Syndrome
7(2)
Does the Hyperactive Syndrome Exist?
9(6)
Clinical Aspects of Diagnosis and Assessment
15(6)
II. THE SYNDROME SEEN DEVELOPMENTALLY
Infancy, Toddler, Preschooler
21(14)
Crying
23(1)
Sleep Difficulties
23(1)
Vocalization
24(1)
Feeding Difficulties
24(1)
Appearance
24(1)
Smiling
25(1)
Cuddling
25(1)
Effect of the ``Difficult'' Infant and Toddler on the Mother-Child Relationship
25(2)
The Preschooler
27(4)
Treatment of Hyperactive Preschoolers
31(4)
The Hyperactive Child In Elementary School
35(15)
Problems Related to Activity
36(1)
Attentional Difficulties
37(3)
Impulsivity
40(1)
Reinforcement Issues in the Learning of Hyperactive Children
41(1)
Poor School Achievement
42(1)
Poor Self-Esteem and Depression
43(1)
Difficulties in Social Interactions at Home and at School
44(1)
Peer and Teacher Relationships
44(1)
Treatment
45(5)
Hyperactives as Adolescents
50(11)
Retrospective Studies
53(2)
Prospective Studies
55(6)
III. ADULTHOOD
The Adult Hyperactive: Psychiatric Status
61(23)
Retrospective Studies
62(2)
Follow-Back Studies
64(2)
Ten-Year Prospective Controlled Follow-Up Study from the Montreal Children's Hospital
66(4)
Fifteen-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study from the Montreal Children's Hospital
70(11)
Similarities and Differences of the Various Studies of Adult Outcome
81(3)
Antisocial Behavior
84(23)
Adolescent Outcome Studies: Prospective and Retrospective
84(3)
Studies of Families of Hyperactives
87(1)
Adult Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Histories Suggesting Childhood Hyperactivity
88(2)
Adult Outcome Studies of Hyperactive Children: Prospective and Retrospective
90(3)
Ten-Year Prospective Controlled Follow-Up Study
93(4)
Fifteen-Year Controlled Prospective Follow-Up Study
97(6)
Limitations of Specific Diagnostic Criteria Scales
103(1)
Similar and Divergent Findings
104(1)
Summary
105(2)
Values and Beliefs
107(11)
Results
107(6)
Discussion
113(5)
Drug and Alcohol Use and Abuse
118(24)
Follow-Up Studies of Adolescent Hyperactives: Prospective and Retrospective
119(3)
Studies of Adult Psychiatric Patients (Including Alcoholics) with Possible Histories of Childhood Hyperactivity
122(2)
Studies of Families of Hyperactive Children
124(1)
Follow-Up Studies of Adult Hyperactives: Prospective and Retrospective
125(4)
Drug and Alcohol Use and Abuse at Ten-Year Follow-Up
129(7)
Drug and Alcohol Use and Abuse at Fifteen-Year Follow-Up
136(6)
Work Record
142(8)
Fifteen-Year Follow-Up: Work Status
144(6)
Self-Esteem and Social Skills
150(12)
Adolescent Follow-Up Studies
150(3)
Adult Follow-Up Studies
153(1)
Ten-Year Follow-Up Study
154(4)
Fifteen-Year Prospective Follow-Up
158(4)
Physiological Measures
162(18)
Physiological Differences in Hyperactive Children
163(6)
Physiological Measures in Adulthood
169(11)
Families of Hyperactives
180(25)
Sibling Studies
180(3)
Parental Studies: Interactional Aspects
183(3)
Parental Studies: Genetic Aspects
186(3)
Long-Term Follow-Up of Families of Hyperactive Children
189(15)
Summary
204(1)
Life-Styles and Illustrative Case Histories
205(16)
Fairly Normal Outcome Group
205(4)
Group with Continuing Symptoms of the Hyperactive Syndrome and / or Social, Emotional, and Interpersonal Problems
209(5)
Group with More Serious Psychiatric or Antisocial Disturbance
214(4)
Conclusions
218(3)
IV. PREDICTIVE FACTORS
Predictive Factors Pertaining to the Child
221(9)
Introduction
221(1)
Child's Age at Referral
222(1)
Degree of Central Nervous System Abnormality
222(2)
IQ or Intelligence
224(2)
Symptoms at Referral
226(4)
Predictive Factors Pertaining to the Family
230(8)
Mental Health of Family Members
230(2)
Parent-Child Relationship: Child-Rearing Practices
232(2)
Socioeconomic Status
234(2)
Overall Family Functioning
236(2)
Predictive Factors Pertaining to Treatment
238(19)
Psychotherapy, Counseling, Remedial Education
238(2)
Drug Treatment
240(2)
Young-Adult Outcome of Hyperactives Who Received Long-Term Stimulant Treatment in Childhood
242(15)
Interrelationship of Various Predictive Factors
257(18)
Results
259(9)
Discussion and Summary
268(7)
V. TREATMENT ISSUES
Clinical Vignettes of Psychotherapy at Different Ages
275(6)
Case Example: Derrick
276(1)
Case Example: David
277(1)
Case Example: Randy
277(1)
Case Example: Henry
278(1)
Case Example: Jimmy
278(3)
The Efficacy of Medication on Hyperactive Adolescents and Adults
281(12)
Stimulant Therapy of Hyperactive Adolescents
281(3)
Stimulant Therapy of Hyperactive Adults
284(9)
VI. THE HYPERACTIVE ADULT LOOKS BACK
Adult Hyperactive Subjects' View of Their Treatment in Childhood and Adolescence
293(8)
Types of Comments Made Regarding Parents
295(1)
Types of Comments Made Regarding Teachers
295(1)
Types of Comments made about Maturation
296(1)
Types of Responses Regarding the Effect of Medication
296(3)
Impressions from the Subjects' Responses
299(1)
Summary
300(1)
Looking Back: Reminiscences from Childhood and Adolescence
301(28)
Ian Murray
VII. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN ATTENTION-DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
Recent Biological and Diagnostic Issues
329(19)
Genetic Studies of Children with ADHD
329(7)
Neurobiological Developments
336(9)
Comorbidity and Subgroups of Children
345(3)
Medication Treatment of ADHD
348(18)
Prevalence of Stimulant Use
348(1)
History of Stimulant Use
348(1)
Effectiveness of Stimulants
349(4)
Adverse Effects (Side Effects) of Stimulants
353(5)
Long-Acting Stimulants
358(1)
Mechanism of Stimulant Action
359(1)
Stimulant Absorption and Metabolism
359(1)
Drug Interactions
360(1)
Nonstimulant Drugs in the Treatment of ADHD
361(4)
Conclusion
365(1)
Psychosocial Treatment of ADHD
366(18)
Behavior Modification
366(3)
Parent Training
369(5)
Social Skills Interventions
374(2)
Academic Skills Training and Remediation
376(1)
Individual Psychotherapy
377(4)
Multimodal Treatment
381(3)
Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adult ADHD
384(23)
Introduction: The Existence of Adult ADHD
384(3)
Diagnostic Assessment
387(4)
Clinical Assessment of Individual Symptoms
391(2)
Two Case Vignettes
393(5)
Differential Diagnosis
398(2)
Treatment of Adult ADHD
400(7)
Conclusions
407(6)
References 413(44)
Author Index 457(12)
Subject Index 469

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