9780130139931

Instructional Classroom Management A Proactive Approach to Behavior Management

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780130139931

  • ISBN10:

    0130139939

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-04-16
  • Publisher: Pearson

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

This comprehensive book presents a proactive behavior management system for decreasing behavior problems in the classroom and the school, plus a full range of strategies for correcting disruptive behavior once it has occurred. Coverage is based on the authors' belief that effective management strategies for any age or ability level must begin with an instructional analysis of the problem and be followed with a solution grounded in instructional principles and built on solid research. Featuring a research-based behavior management plan for an entire school year which illustrates the development of a proactive teaching plan, helps future teachers see how behaviors change over the course of a school year and how to adapt management to changing situations and needs. The research-based behavior management plan includes assessment, lesson plan creation, and a list of management strategies. Instructional examples throughout the material illustrate research-based guidelines for managing behavior in the classroom and school setting. Expanded list of reinforcement strategies includes strategies for use with learners of all ages and abilities. Chapter 7,Social Skills Instruction in the Classroom sets out a viable, research-based plan for both assessing and teaching critical social skills. Chapter 10,School-Wide Discipline and Instructional Classroom Management presents a proactive, research-based 180-day plan that can serve as a framework for a repertoire of strategies that will achieve discipline both in and out of the classroom. For future Special Education teachers.

Table of Contents

Classroom Management and the Context of Instruction
2(18)
Management and the Context of Instruction
5(1)
Orientation of the Text
5(1)
Thinking About Behavior Management
6(4)
Can't Versus Won't Problems
7(3)
Assumptions About Instructional Management
10(6)
Organizing Principles About the Learner
11(2)
Organizing Principles About the Teacher
13(3)
Summary
16(1)
References
16(2)
Understanding Student Behavior: Translating Theoretical Perspectives into Effective Practice
18(26)
Behavioral Perspective
21(4)
What Is It? Definition, History, and Critical Features
21(2)
How Does Behavior Modification View Student Behavior?
23(1)
How Do I Use the Behavioral Perspective in My Classroom?
24(1)
Advantages and Limitations of the Behavioral Perspective
24(1)
Biophysical Perspective
25(2)
What Is It? Definition, History, and Critical Features
25(1)
How Does the Biophysical Perspective View Student Behavior?
26(1)
How Do I Use the Biophysical Perspective in My Classroom?
26(1)
Advantages and Limitations of the Biophysical Perspective
26(1)
Psychoeducational Perspective
27(3)
What Is It? Definition, History, and Critical Features
27(2)
How Does the Psychoeducational Perspective View Student Behavior?
29(1)
How Do I Use the Psychoeducational Perspective in My Classroom?
29(1)
Advantages and Limitations of the Psychoeducational Perspective
30(1)
Ecological Perspective
30(2)
What Is It? Definition, History, and Critical Features
30(1)
How Does the Ecological Perspective View Student Behavior?
30(1)
How Do I Use the Ecological Perspective in My Classroom?
30(2)
Advantages and Limitations of the Ecological Perspective
32(1)
Social Learning Perspective
32(4)
What Is It? Definition, History, and Critical Features
32(2)
How Does the Social Learning Perspective View Student Behavior?
34(1)
How Do I Use the Social Learning Perspective in My Classroom?
35(1)
Advantages and Limitations of the Social Learning Perspective
35(1)
Instructional Perspective
36(5)
What Is It? Definition, History, and Critical Features
36(1)
How Does the Instructional Perspective View Student Behavior?
37(1)
How Do I Use the Instructional Perspective in My Classroom?
38(1)
Advantages and Limitations of the Instructional Perspective
39(2)
Summary
41(1)
Chapter Activities
41(1)
References
41(3)
A Conceptual Framework for Instructional Classroom Management
44(26)
A Proactive Approach
47(4)
Task Dimensions of Instructional Classroom Management
51(9)
Task History
52(2)
Task Response Form
54(1)
Task Modality
55(1)
Task Complexity
56(2)
Task Schedule
58(1)
Task Variation
59(1)
Application of Task Dimensions to Classroom Management
60(6)
Before Instruction
60(3)
During Instruction
63(1)
After Instruction
64(2)
Summary
66(1)
Chapter Activities
66(1)
References
66(4)
A Temporal Framework for Instructional Classroom Management
70(34)
Step 1: Considering the Phases of Instruction
72(18)
Aligning the Phases of Instruction
72(1)
Before Instruction: Designing Instructional Classroom Management
73(10)
During Instruction: Delivering Instructional Classroom Management
83(4)
After Instruction: Reflecting and Adjusting Instructional Classroom Management
87(3)
Step 2: Considering the Phases of the School Year
90(12)
Critical Features of the 180-Day Plan
90(1)
Phases of the 180-Day Plan
91(11)
Summary
102(1)
Chapter Activities
103(1)
References
103(1)
Instructional Classroom Management Assessment
104(22)
Why Develop an Assessment Plan?
106(1)
Traditional Assessment in Behavior Management
107(1)
Limitations of Assessment Models in Behavior Management
108(1)
Linking Assessment to Instruction
108(1)
Developing Proactive Procedures
108(1)
Considering Phases of Instruction
108(1)
Incorporating Assessment Into Teaching
109(1)
Features of the Instructional Classroom: Linking Assessment, Management, and Instruction
109(2)
Proactive Assessment
109(1)
Comprehensive Assessment
109(1)
Assessment Linked to Instruction
110(1)
Assessment Integrated School Wide
110(1)
The Instructional Classroom Management Assessment Model
111(10)
Assessment Before Instruction
112(4)
Assessment During Instruction
116(3)
Assessment After Instruction
119(2)
Instructional Classroom Management Assessment Checklist
121(3)
Adapting Instructional Classroom Management Assessment
124(1)
Add Assessment Questions When Necessary
124(1)
Use With Individuals and Student Groups
124(1)
Combine With Other Procedures
124(1)
Summary
124(1)
Chapter Activities
125(1)
References
125(1)
Using Reinforcement to Increase Student Motivation
126(26)
Why Does Reinforcement Sometimes Fail?
128(1)
Conceptualizing Reinforcement as Instruction
129(2)
The Instructional Reinforcement Plan: Its Purpose and Role in Instructional Classroom Management
131(2)
An Integrative Purpose
131(1)
Increasing Academic Performance
131(1)
Using Reinforcement for the School Year
132(1)
Reinforcement and Instruction
132(1)
Dimensions and Procedures of Reinforcement
133(8)
Categories of Reinforcement
133(4)
Schedule of Reinforcement
137(1)
Intensity of Reinforcement
138(1)
Timing of Reinforcement
138(2)
Integrating Reinforcement and Instruction
140(1)
Aligning Reinforcement and Task Dimensions
141(8)
Task History and Reinforcement
142(1)
Task Response Form and Reinforcement
143(2)
Task Modality and Reinforcement
145(1)
Task Complexity and Reinforcement
146(1)
Task Schedule and Reinforcement
147(1)
Task Variation and Reinforcement
148(1)
Summary
149(1)
Chapter Activities
150(1)
References
150(2)
Social Skills Instruction in the Classroom
152(22)
What Are Social Skills?
154(1)
Why Teach Social Skills?
155(2)
What Is Social Skills Instruction?
157(1)
How Should Social Skills Be Taught?
157(11)
What Social Skills Should Be Taught?
158(6)
What Would a Social Skills Lesson Plan Look Like?
164(4)
How Is Student Learning of Social Skills Determined?
168(1)
How Effective Is the Instruction?
168(1)
How Effective Is the Skill for Students?
168(1)
How Can Social Skills Instruction Be Enhanced and Supported?
168(1)
Summary
169(2)
Chapter Activities
171(1)
References
171(3)
Punishment: A Transition Tool Only
174(22)
Definition of Punishment
176(1)
Punishment Used as a Transition Tool
176(5)
Alternatives to Punishment
177(4)
Guidelines for Using Punishment as a Transition Tool
181(2)
Administrative Guidelines
181(1)
Implementation Guidelines
182(1)
Punishment Strategies
183(10)
Verbal Reprimands
183(2)
Quiet-Time Strategy
185(2)
Owing-Time Strategy
187(2)
Response-Cost Strategy
189(1)
Time-Out From Positive Reinforcement
190(3)
Punishment Strategies and the Continuum of Complexity
193(1)
Summary
193(1)
Chapter Activities
194(1)
References
194(2)
Managing Persistent Behavior Problems: Strategies and Examples
196(22)
A Model for Managing Persistent Behavior Problems
198(9)
Assessment
199(1)
Modification of the Context and the Structure of the Lesson
200(1)
Modification of Task Dimensions
201(1)
Modification of Reinforcement
202(1)
Strategic Use of Precorrection Strategies
203(2)
Strategic Use of Neutral Tasks
205(1)
Strategic Use of Punishment Strategies
206(1)
Managing Persistent Behavior Problems: Four Examples
207(9)
Instructional Analysis of Problem 1
208(1)
Instructional Strategies for Prevention of Problem 1
208(2)
Instructional Analysis of Problem 2
210(1)
Instructional Strategies for Prevention of Problem 2
210(3)
Instructional Analysis of Problem 3
213(1)
Instructional Strategies for Prevention of Problem 3
214(1)
Instructional Analysis of Problem 4
215(1)
Instructional Strategies for Prevention of Problem 4
215(1)
Summary
216(1)
Chapter Activities
216(1)
References
217(1)
School-Wide Discipline and Instructional Classroom Management: A Systems Approach
218(31)
An Instructional Approach to School-Wide Discipline
220(8)
Continuum of Behavior Support
221(3)
Systems Approach to School-Wide Discipline
224(4)
Components of a School-Wide Discipline System
228(8)
School Purpose Statement
228(1)
School-Wide Behavior Expectations
229(1)
Teaching Behavioral Expectations
229(1)
Continuum of Procedures for Encouraging Expectations
230(3)
Continuum of Procedures for Discouraging Rule Violations
233(2)
Procedures for Monitoring the Effectiveness of the School-Wide Discipline Plan
235(1)
Implementation of School-Wide Discipline System Within the 180-Day Plan
236(8)
Before Implementation
239(3)
During Implementation
242(1)
After Implementation
243(1)
Summary
244(1)
Chapter Activities
245(1)
References
245(4)
Name Index 249(3)
Subject Index 252

Excerpts

The second edition of Instructional Classroom Management: A Proactive Approach to Behavior Managementcontinues to be about managing behavior from an instructional point of view. We are convinced more than ever that effective management strategies for all ages and ability levels must begin with an educational analysis of the problem, followed by a solution grounded in instructional principles. We discuss that students can best be taught academic, behavioral, and social skills through the use of research-based instructional procedures and intervention strategies. The design and philosophy of our approach helps teachers proactively manage their school and instructional environments. The second edition was developed for classroom teachers, school administrators, school counselors and psychologists, and professionals charged with the responsibility of guiding educational programs for students. It is comprehensive in scope, presenting a proactive management system designed to decrease student behavior problems in schools. In addition, we provide a full range of strategies for teaching and correcting disruptive behavior once it occurs. The conceptual framework of the text and the intervention strategies presented are based on current research in the field. This edition integrates current research into a management plan that is effective for an entire school year. This plan includes assessment and instruction that allow the teacher to develop teaching plans to proactively reduce the occurrence of disruptive behavior in the classroom and the school. In addition, we have developed a more comprehensive list of reinforcement strategies to use with students of all ages and ability levels. Dr. George Sugai of the University of Oregon and his colleagues have contributed two chapters to our text. First, Chapter 7 is about teaching students social skills. Sugai and his colleagues present a plan for teachers to both assess students' social skills and teach critical social skills. The techniques discussed in this chapter are research-based and organized so that teachers can effectively implement them with students in need of social skills instruction. In addition, Sugai and his colleagues have contributed Chapter 10 on school-wide discipline and instructional classroom management. This research-based school-wide discipline system is a proactive instructional approach organized around a 180-day plan that can be effectively implemented at the classroom and school level. A NOTE TO THE READER AND INSTRUCTOR In this edition, we have upgraded and expanded the pedagogical features to aid instruction and learning. We have increased the number of instructional examples in the text to provide the reader with a range of examples of teachers managing classroom behavior. These examples illustrate our research-based guidelines and philosophy for instructional classroom management and reflect the broad range of problems teachers face in classrooms today. Each chapter begins with an overview outlining critical concepts. Each chapter ends with a brief, succinct summary. We have included activities for students to translate research into practice. These activities were designed to enhance the understanding of the concepts discussed in the chapters. For example, students are asked to observe in classrooms to determine the type of management strategies teachers use with disruptive students.

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