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Introductory Chemistry w/ Prob Solving Gd & Wkbk, Student Bk Component, CD-ROM,9780321046345

Introductory Chemistry w/ Prob Solving Gd & Wkbk, Student Bk Component, CD-ROM

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780321046345

ISBN10:
032104634X
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $148.40

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Summary

Steve Russo and Mike Silver turn chemistry into a memorable story that engages readers and provides the context they need to understand and remember core concepts. The book builds interesting applications and well-designed illustrations into the narrative to get and hold attention, then builds confidence with integrated active learning activities. Readers make the connections between concepts and the problem-solving techniques they need to master as they read. The new edition strengthens this conceptual approach and presents additional quantitative techniques in key areas. Readers will find enhanced support for quantitative problem-solving and more challenging questions at the end of each chapter, in addition to the wealth of technology-based support onThe Chemistry Place(tm), Special Edition and onThe Chemistry of Life CD-ROM . For college instructors and students.

Table of Contents

About the Authors iii
Preface xi
What Is Chemistry?
1(24)
Science and Technology
1(2)
Matter
3(6)
Matter and Its Physical Transformations
9(3)
Matter and Its Chemical Transformations
12(3)
How Science Is Done: The Scientific Method
15(3)
Learning Chemistry with This Book
18(7)
The Numerical Side of Chemistry
25(50)
Numbers in Chemistry---Precision and Accuracy
25(3)
Numbers in Chemistry---Uncertainty and Significant Figures
28(3)
Zeros and Significant Figures
31(3)
Scientific Notation
34(4)
How to Handle Significant Figures and Scientific Notation When Doing Math
38(4)
Numbers with a Name---Units of Measure
42(6)
Density: A Useful Physical Property of Matter
48(2)
Doing Calculations in Chemistry---Unit Analysis
50(5)
Rearranging Equations---Algebraic Manipulations with Density
55(3)
Quantifying Energy
58(17)
The Evolution of Atomic Theory
75(44)
Dalton's Atomic Theory
75(5)
Development of a Model for Atomic Structure
80(1)
The Nucleus
81(4)
The Structure of the Atom
85(6)
The Law of Mendeleev---Chemical Periodicity
91(5)
The Modern Periodic Table
96(6)
Other Regular Variations in the Properties of Elements
102(17)
The Modern Model of the Atom
119(44)
Seeing the Light---A New Model of the Atom
119(4)
A New Kind of Physics---Energy Is Quantized
123(1)
The Bohr Theory of Atomic Structure
124(3)
Periodicity and Line Spectra Explained
127(7)
Subshells and Electron Configuration
134(8)
Compound Formation and the Octet Rule
142(5)
Atomic Size Revisited
147(1)
The Modern Quantum Mechanical Model of the Atom
148(15)
Chemical Bonding and Nomenclature
163(46)
Molecules---What Are They? Why Are They?
163(1)
Holding Molecules Together---The Covalent Bond
164(6)
Molecules, Dot Structures, and the Octet Rule
170(6)
Multiple Bonds
176(5)
Ionic Bonding---Bring on the Metals
181(2)
Equal Versus Unequal Sharing of Electrons---Electronegativity and the Polar Covalent Bond
183(4)
Nomenclature---Naming Chemical Compounds
187(22)
The Shape of Molecules
209(32)
Why Is the Shape of a Molecule Important?
209(2)
Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) Theory
211(9)
Polarity of Molecules, or When Does 2 + 2 Not Equal 4?
220(8)
Intermolecular Forces---Dipolar Interactions
228(13)
Chemical Reactions
241(29)
What Is a Chemical Reaction?
241(1)
How Are Reactants Transformed into Products?
242(3)
Balancing Chemical Equations
245(4)
Types of Reactions
249(2)
Solubility and Precipitation Reactions
251(7)
Introduction to Acid-Base Reactions
258(12)
Stoichiometry and the Mole
270(49)
Stoichiometry---What Is It?
270(4)
The Mole
274(9)
Reaction Stoichiometry
283(6)
Dealing with a Limiting Reactant
289(6)
Combustion Analysis
295(8)
Going Back and Forth Between Formulas and Percent Composition
303(16)
The Transfer of Electrons from One Atom to Another in a Chemical Reaction
319(46)
What Is Electricity?
319(1)
Electron Bookkeeping---Oxidation States
320(12)
Recognizing Electron-Transfer Reactions
332(5)
Electricity from Redox Reactions
337(7)
Which Way Do Electrons Flow?---The EMF Series
344(5)
Another Look at Oxidation: The Corrosion of Metals
349(16)
Intermolecular Forces and the Phases of Matter
365(26)
Why Does Matter Exist in Different Phases?
365(6)
Intermolecular Forces
371(4)
A Closer Look at Dipole Forces---Hydrogen-Bonding
375(5)
Nonmolecular Substances
380(11)
What If There Were No Intermolecular Forces? The Ideal Gas
391(34)
Describing the Gas Phase---P, V, n, and T
391(7)
Describing a Gas Mathematically---The Ideal Gas Law
398(7)
Getting the Most from the Ideal Gas Law
405(20)
Solutions
425(66)
What Is a Solution?
425(3)
Energy and the Formation of Solutions
428(8)
Entropy and the Formation of Solutions
436(2)
Solubility, Temperature, and Pressure
438(4)
Getting Unlikes to Dissolve---Soaps and Detergents
442(2)
Molarity
444(10)
Percent Composition
454(3)
Reactions in Solution
457(8)
Colligative Properties of Solutions
465(26)
When Reactants Turn into Products
491(48)
Chemical Kinetics
491(3)
Energy Changes and Chemical Reactions
494(9)
Reaction Rates and Activation Energy---Getting over the Hill
503(9)
How Concentration Affects Reaction Rate
512(5)
Reaction Order
517(4)
Why Reaction Orders Have the Values They Do---Mechanisms
521(18)
Chemical Equilibrium
539(42)
Dynamic Equilibrium---My Reaction Seems To Have Stopped!
539(6)
Why Do Chemical Reactions Reach Equilibrium?
545(4)
The Position of Equilibrium---The Equilibrium Constant Keq
549(6)
Disturbing a Reaction Already at Equilibrium---Le Chatelier's Principle
555(4)
How Equilibrium Responds to Temperature Changes
559(3)
Equilibria for Heterogeneous Reactions, Solubility, and Equilibrium Calculations
562(19)
Electrolytes, Acids, and Bases
581(54)
Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes
581(7)
Electrolytes Weak and Strong
588(2)
Acids Weak and Strong
590(4)
Bases The Opposites of Acids
594(4)
Help! I Need Another Definition of Acid and Base
598(3)
Weak Bases
601(3)
Is This Solution Acidic or Basic? Understanding Water, Autodissociation, and Kw
604(6)
The pH Scale
610(5)
Resisting pH Changes---Buffers
615(20)
Nuclear Chemistry
635(36)
The Case of the Missing Mass---Mass Defect and the Stability of the Nucleus
635(5)
Half Life and the Band of Stability
640(3)
Spontaneous Nuclear Changes---Radioactivity
643(11)
Using Radioactive Isotopes to Date Objects
654(2)
Nuclear Energy---Fission and Fusion
656(5)
Biological Effects and Medical Applications of Radioactivity
661(10)
The Chemistry of Carbon
671(44)
Carbon---A Unique Element
671(4)
Naturally Occurring Compounds of Carbon and Hydrogen---Hydrocarbons
675(7)
Naming Hydrocarbons
682(12)
Properties of Hydrocarbons
694(1)
Functionalized Hydrocarbons---Bring On the Heteroatoms
695(20)
Synthetic and Biological Polymers
715(1)
Building Polymers
715(1)
Polyethylene and Its Relatives
716(3)
Nylon---A Polymer You Can Wear
719(2)
Polysaccharides and Carbohydrates
721(3)
Proteins
724(4)
DNA---The Master Biopolymer
728
Glossary G-1
Selected Answers A-1
Index I-1


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