CART

(0) items

Justice Administration : Police, Courts and Corrections Management,9780131123007
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Justice Administration : Police, Courts and Corrections Management

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131123007

ISBN10:
0131123009
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $99.60
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.01

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Summary

For courses in Criminal Justice Administration and Police Administration. Unlike other texts, this comprehensive, single-author volume addresses the administration of the three components of the justice systempolice, courts, correctionsas well as other contemporary administrative areas and hot issuese.g., ethics, terrorism, racial profiling, vehicle pursuits, gender bias and women in corrections. Focused on the primary people, concepts, terms, and reality of contemporary justice administration, it reflects 33 years of the author's hands-on, front-line experience as a police and corrections practitioner and administrator, planner, and educator.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
About the Author xxi
Introduction xxiii
PART I JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION: AN INTRODUCTION
1(58)
The Study and Scope of Justice Administration
3(19)
Key Terms and Concepts
3(1)
Learning Objectives
3(1)
Why Study Justice Administration?
4(2)
Purpose of the Book and Key Terms
4(1)
Organization of the Book
5(1)
A True System of Justice?
6(7)
A Criminal Justice Process?
7(2)
A Criminal Justice Network?
9(1)
A Criminal Justice Nonsystem?
10(2)
Or a True Criminal Justice System?
12(1)
The Foundations of Justice and Administration: Legal and Historical Bases
13(3)
The Consensus Versus Conflict Debate
13(2)
Crime Control Through Due Process
15(1)
Public-Sector Versus Private-Sector Administration
16(1)
Policymaking in Justice Administration
17(2)
Summary
19(1)
Questions for Review
19(1)
Notes
19(3)
Organization and Administration: Principles and Practices
22(37)
Key Terms and Concepts
22(1)
Learning Objectives
22(1)
Introduction
23(1)
Defining Organizations
24(1)
Organizational Theory and Function
24(1)
Elements of an Organization
24(1)
Organizational Inputs/Outputs
25(1)
Organizational Structure
25(4)
Managing the Organization
29(1)
What Is Management?
29(1)
Organizational Communication
30(5)
Definition and Characteristics
30(2)
Communication Within Criminal Justice Organizations
32(1)
The Grapevine
33(1)
Oral and Written Communication
34(1)
Other Barriers to Effective Communication
34(1)
Cultural Empathy
35(1)
Historical Approaches to Management
35(3)
Scientific Management
35(2)
Human Relations Management
37(1)
Systems Management
37(1)
Primary Leadership Theories
38(4)
Trait Theory
38(1)
Style Theory
39(1)
Situational Leadership
40(2)
The Managerial Grid
42(2)
Types of Leadership Skills
44(1)
Motivating Employees
45(9)
The Hawthorne Studies
45(3)
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
48(1)
McGregor's Theory X/Theory Y
49(2)
Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory
51(2)
Expectancy and Contingency Theories
53(1)
Summary
54(1)
Questions for Review
55(1)
Notes
55(4)
PART II THE POLICE
59(88)
Police Organization and Operation
61(26)
Key Terms and Concepts
61(1)
Learning Objectives
61(1)
Introduction
62(1)
Police Agencies as Organizations
62(3)
Organizing: The Grouping of Activities
62(2)
Specialization in Police Agencies
64(1)
Traditional and Contemporary Police Organization
65(3)
The Traditional Bureaucratic Model
65(1)
Attempts to Reform the Traditional Model
66(2)
Examples of Organizational Structures
68(3)
Policies, Procedures, Rules, and Regulations in Policing
71(1)
The Influence of Research on Police Functions
72(4)
The Mid-1970s: Crises Stimulate Progress
72(2)
Rethinking ``Sacred Cow'' Traditions
74(1)
Other Major Findings
75(1)
Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving
76(4)
Today's Dominant Philosophy
76(1)
The S.A.R.A. Process
76(2)
Evaluation and Research
78(1)
Two Illustrations: Chicago, Illinois, and Lawrence, Massachusetts
79(1)
Effecting Change in Policing
80(2)
Change Begins with the Supervisor
80(1)
The Chief Executive and Mid-Level Manager
81(1)
Case Studies
82(2)
Summary
84(1)
Questions for Review
84(1)
Notes
84(3)
Police Personnel Roles and Functions
87(31)
Key Terms and Concepts
87(1)
Learning Objectives
87(1)
Introduction
88(1)
Roles of the Police Executive: The Mintzberg Model of CEOs
88(4)
The Interpersonal Role
89(1)
The Informational Role
90(1)
The Decision-Maker Role
91(1)
Police Executives
92(1)
Obtaining the Best: The Assessment Center
92(1)
Skills of Good Managers
93(1)
Chiefs of Police
93(3)
Expectations of Government and Community
94(1)
Qualifications
94(1)
Job Protection, Termination, and the Political Arena
95(1)
The Sheriff
96(2)
Role and Functions
97(1)
Rating Chief Executive Performance
98(2)
Inappropriate Evaluation Criteria
98(1)
Appropriate Evaluation Criteria
99(1)
Middle Managers: Captains and Lieutenants
100(3)
First-Line Supervisors: Becoming a Patrol Sergeant
103(5)
Seeking the Gold Badge
103(1)
Assuming the Position: General Roles and Functions
103(2)
Basic Tasks
105(1)
Types of Supervisors
106(2)
The Patrol Officer
108(1)
Basic Tasks
108(1)
Problems with Getting the Best
108(1)
What Traits Make a ``Good Cop''?
109(1)
Roles and Functions of All Personnel in COPPS
110(3)
The Chief Executive
110(1)
Middle Managers
111(1)
First-Line Supervisors
111(1)
Rank-and-File Officers
112(1)
Case Studies
113(2)
Summary
115(1)
Questions for Review
115(1)
Notes
115(3)
Police Issues and Practices
118(29)
Key Terms and Concepts
118(1)
Learning Objectives
118(1)
Introduction
119(1)
A Cautionary Note
119(1)
Terrorism
120(5)
Definition and Types
120(2)
A Looming Threat: Bioterrorism
122(1)
Tactical and Administrative Responses
122(2)
Technology Needs
124(1)
A ``Hot Button Issue'': Racial Profiling
125(2)
Managing the Use of Force
127(3)
Power That Is to Be Used Judiciously
127(2)
A Typology of Abuse of Authority
129(1)
Domestic Violence by Police
130(1)
School Violence
131(3)
What's Happened to Our Children?
131(1)
Leadership Rejoinder
131(3)
Vehicular Pursuits
134(5)
A High-Stakes Operation
134(1)
The Supreme Court's View
134(1)
Leadership Rejoinder
135(4)
When All Hell Breaks Loose: Notifying Supervisors, Managers, and Administrators
139(1)
Case Studies
140(3)
Summary
143(1)
Questions for Review
143(1)
Notes
144(3)
PART III THE COURTS
147(58)
Court Organization and Operation
149(18)
Key Terms and Concepts
149(1)
Learning Objectives
149(1)
Introduction
150(1)
By the Numbers: Court Organizational Statistics
150(1)
Inside the Courts: A Look at Decor, Decorum, Citizens
151(1)
Hallowed Places
151(2)
Justice in the Eye of the Beholder
152(1)
Seeking Truth in an Adversarial Atmosphere
152(1)
Courts as Organizations
153(3)
A Nonbureaucratic Work Group
153(1)
Organizational Structure
154(2)
The Influence of Courts in Policymaking
156(2)
Decreasing Litigation: Alternative Dispute Resolution
158(1)
ADR Options: Arbitration and Mediation
158(1)
Attempts at Reforming Court Organization
159(4)
Case Study
163(1)
Summary
164(1)
Questions for Review
164(1)
Notes
164(3)
Court Personnel Roles and Functions
167(22)
Key Terms and Concepts
167(1)
Learning Objectives
167(1)
Introduction
168(1)
Defining Judicial Administration
168(2)
The Jurists
170(4)
Those Who Would Be Judge: Methods of Selection
170(2)
Benefits and Problems
172(2)
Judges as Court Managers
174(2)
Court Clerks
176(1)
Key Individuals
176(1)
The Forgotten Majority: Clerks in Rural Courts
177(1)
Trained Court Administrators
177(2)
Development and Training
177(1)
General Duties
178(1)
Conflict Among Judicial Administrators
179(2)
A Difficult Dichotomy
179(1)
Sources of Disagreement
180(1)
How Judges Evaluate Administrators
181(1)
Jury Administration
182(2)
Case Study
184(1)
Summary
185(1)
Questions for Review
185(1)
Notes
186(3)
Court Issues and Practices
189(16)
Key Terms and Concepts
189(1)
Learning Objectives
189(1)
Introduction
190(1)
Justice from the Due Process and Crime Control Perspectives
190(1)
The Dilemma of Delay
191(3)
The Consequences
191(1)
Suggested Solutions
192(1)
Case Scheduling: Two Systems
193(1)
Gender Bias
194(1)
Should Juveniles Be Tried as Adults?
195(1)
Should the Exclusionary Rule Be Banned?
196(1)
Should Cameras Be Banned?
196(2)
Does Plea Bargaining Belong?
198(1)
Court Administration Practice and Reform: A Model
198(3)
Case Study
201(1)
Summary
202(1)
Questions for Review
202(1)
Notes
202(3)
PART IV CORRECTIONS
205(92)
Corrections Organization and Operation
207(27)
Key Terms and Concepts
207(1)
Learning Objectives
207(1)
Introduction
208(1)
Correctional Organizations, Generally
208(2)
Key Facts: Inmates, Employment, Expenditures
208(1)
General Mission and Features
209(1)
Prisons as Organizations
210(6)
Statewide Central Offices
210(2)
Prison Organization and Administration
212(4)
The Increase in Prison Populations
216(2)
Rehabilitative Versus Lock- `Em-Up Philosophies and Truth in Sentencing Laws
216(2)
Inmate Litigation
218(3)
Rights of Inmates
218(1)
A Resurgence of the Hands-Off Doctrine?
219(1)
Trends in Litigation
219(1)
The Due Deference Doctrine
220(1)
Jails as Organizations
221(3)
The ``New Generation'' Jail
221(2)
Making Jails Productive
223(1)
Research in Correctional Institutions
224(3)
Prison and Jail Crowding
224(1)
Spatial and Social Densities
224(1)
Health Risks from Incarceration
225(1)
Effects of Long-Term Incarceration
225(1)
Effects of Solitary Confinement
225(1)
Effects of Death Row
226(1)
Case Studies
227(1)
Summary
228(1)
Questions for Review
229(1)
Notes
229(5)
Corrections Personnel Roles and Functions
234(19)
Key Terms and Concepts
234(1)
Learning Objectives
234(1)
Introduction
235(1)
The Warden
235(4)
Needed: A Balance of Power
235(1)
A Profile
236(1)
Administering Prisons
236(2)
Does Diversifying Prison Staff Help?
238(1)
Middle Managers and Supervisors
239(1)
``Thy Brother's Keeper'': Correctional Officers
239(3)
An Ironic Comparison: Correctional Officers and Inmates
239(1)
A Typology: Eight Types of COs
240(2)
Jail Personnel
242(5)
Jail Purpose and Environment
242(1)
Choosing Jail Work and Type of Facility
243(1)
Employee Job Satisfaction and Attrition
243(2)
Female Jail Deputies
245(1)
Detention as a Career Path
245(1)
Employee Training
246(1)
Case Studies
247(2)
Summary
249(1)
Questions for Review
250(1)
Notes
250(3)
Community Corrections: Probation and Parole
253(24)
Key Terms and Concepts
253(1)
Learning Objectives
253(1)
Introduction
254(1)
Why Alternatives to Imprisonment?
254(1)
The Burden of Large Probation and Parole Caseloads
255(1)
Probation Systems
256(4)
Types of Systems
256(2)
Probation Departments' Need for an Organizational Plan
258(1)
Systems Theory
258(1)
Management Styles
259(1)
Parole Systems
260(2)
Models for Providing Services
260(2)
The Demise of Federal Parole
262(1)
Intermediate Sanctions
262(8)
Alternatives to Incarceration
263(7)
Case Studies
270(3)
Summary
273(1)
Questions for Review
273(1)
Notes
274(3)
Corrections Issues and Practices
277(20)
Key Terms and Concepts
277(1)
Learning Objectives
277(1)
Introduction
278(1)
Issues Facing Correctional Administrators
278(3)
Substantive Correctional Issues
278(2)
Administrative Correctional Issues
280(1)
Sexual Coercion in Correctional Institutions
281(1)
The Extent of Victimization
281(1)
Administrators' Roles
282(1)
Chain Gangs and Boot Camps: Cruel and Unusual Punishment?
282(1)
Chain Gangs Reintroduced
282(1)
Shock Incarceration
283(1)
Issues Concerning Inmate Populations
283(3)
The Aging Offender
284(1)
Juvenile Offenders Sentenced as Adults
284(1)
Female Offenders
285(1)
Mentally Ill Offenders
285(1)
Minority Inmates
286(1)
Drug Use in Prisons: Interdiction and Treatment
286(2)
The Pennsylvania Plan
286(1)
Treating the Problem in Prisons
287(1)
The Move Toward Privatization
288(2)
Emergence of the Concept
288(1)
Arguments For and Against
288(2)
Case Studies
290(3)
Summary
293(1)
Questions for Review
293(1)
Notes
293(4)
PART V ISSUES SPANNING THE JUSTICE SYSTEM: ADMINISTRATIVE CHALLENGES AND PRACTICES
297(167)
Ethical Considerations
299(25)
Key Terms and Concepts
299(1)
Learning Objectives
299(1)
Introduction
300(1)
Food for Thought: Some Ethical Dilemmas
300(2)
Ethics, Generally
302(3)
Philosophical Foundations
302(1)
Types of Ethics
303(2)
Ethics in Policing
305(6)
A Primer: The Oral Interview
305(1)
A ``Slippery Slope''? Lying and Deception
305(2)
Gratuities
307(1)
Greed and Temptation
308(1)
Community Policing
309(1)
Training, Supervision, Values
310(1)
Ethics in the Courts
311(3)
The Evolution of Standards of Conduct
311(1)
The Judge
311(2)
Lawyers for the Defense
313(1)
Prosecutors
314(1)
Other Court Employees
314(1)
Ethics in Corrections
314(2)
Guiding Decision Making
316(1)
Some Tests for the Justice System Recruit
317(1)
Case Studies
318(2)
Summary
320(1)
Questions for Review
321(1)
Notes
321(3)
Rights of Criminal Justice Employees
324(32)
Key Terms and Concepts
324(1)
Learning Objectives
324(1)
Introduction
325(1)
Overview
325(2)
The Employment Relationship
327(8)
Recruitment and Hiring
327(1)
Disparate Treatment
327(2)
How Old Is ``Too Old'' in Criminal Justice?
329(1)
Criminal Justice and Affirmative Action
330(1)
Property Rights in Employment
331(1)
Pay and Benefits
332(2)
Criminal Justice and a Safe Workplace
334(1)
Constitutional Rights of Criminal Justice Employees
335(10)
Freedom of Speech and Association
335(3)
Searches and Seizures
338(1)
Self-Incrimination
339(1)
Religious Practices
340(1)
Sexual Misconduct
340(1)
Residency Requirements
341(1)
Moonlighting
342(1)
Misuse of Firearms
342(1)
Alcohol and Drugs in the Workplace
343(2)
Rights of Police Officers
345(1)
Sexual Harassment
346(2)
The Family and Medical Leave Act
348(1)
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
348(2)
Case Studies
350(1)
Summary
351(1)
Questions for Review
351(1)
Notes
352(4)
Special Challenges: Discipline, Labor Relations, and Liability
356(33)
Key Terms and Concepts
356(1)
Learning Objectives
356(1)
Introduction
357(1)
Disciplinary Policies and Practices
358(11)
Maintaining the Public Trust
358(1)
Due Process Requirements
358(2)
A Tradition of Problems in Policing
360(1)
Automated Records Systems
360(1)
Determining the Level and Nature of Action
360(1)
Positive and Negative Discipline
361(1)
Dealing with Complaints
362(7)
Labor Relations
369(9)
Unionization in Policing, Courts, and Corrections
369(3)
Collective Bargaining: Types, Relationships, Negotiations, Job Actions
372(6)
Civil Liability
378(6)
Torts and Negligence
379(1)
Section 1983 Legislation
380(1)
New Areas of Potential Liability
381(1)
Liability of Corrections Personnel
382(2)
Case Studies
384(1)
Summary
385(1)
Questions for Review
385(1)
Notes
386(3)
Financial Administration
389(29)
Key Terms and Concepts
389(1)
Learning Objectives
389(1)
Introduction
390(1)
The Budget
390(1)
A Working Definition
390(1)
Elements of a Budget
391(10)
The Budget Cycle
391(1)
Budget Formulation
391(1)
Budget Approval
391(8)
Budget Execution
399(1)
The Audit
399(2)
Budget Formats
401(10)
The Line-Item Budget
401(5)
The Performance Budget
406(2)
The Program Budget
408(1)
PPBS and Zero-Based Budgeting Formats
409(2)
Potential Pitfalls in Budgeting
411(2)
The Need for Budgeting Flexibility
411(1)
Common Cost and Waste Problems
412(1)
Strategies for Augmenting Criminal Justice Budgets
413(1)
Case Study
414(1)
Summary
415(1)
Questions for Review
415(1)
Notes
415(3)
Technology Review
418(22)
Key Terms and Concepts
418(1)
Learning Objectives
418(1)
Introduction
419(1)
Policing Technologies
420(10)
Recent Developments in Less-Than-Lethal Weapons
420(1)
Crime Mapping
421(1)
Locating Serial Offenders
422(1)
Ending High-Speed Pursuits
423(1)
DNA
423(1)
Fingerprints and Mug Shots
424(1)
Crime Scenes
424(1)
Firearms
425(2)
Gang Intelligence Systems
427(1)
Other Technologies
427(3)
Reverse 911
430(1)
In Development
430(1)
Court Technologies
430(4)
Six Types
430(3)
Courtroom 21
433(1)
Corrections Facilities
434(2)
New Demands on Offender Management
434(1)
Automated Direct Supervision in Jails
434(1)
``Virtual Visits'' to Hospitals and Courtrooms
435(1)
Kiosk Check-in for Probationers
435(1)
A Body of Evidence: Biometrics
436(1)
For More Information
436(1)
Summary
436(1)
Questions for Review
436(1)
Notes
437(3)
Peeking over the Rim: What Lies Ahead?
440(24)
Key Terms and Concepts
440(1)
Learning Objectives
440(1)
Introduction
441(1)
Why Study Futures in Justice Administration?
441(1)
Predicting the Future
442(1)
Scanning, Scenario Writing, Drivers
442(1)
A Changing Nation
443(3)
Faces of America
443(2)
Crime, Violence, and the Influence of Drugs and Guns
445(1)
What the Future Portends for the Police
446(4)
Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving
447(2)
Participative Management for More Highly Educated Officers
449(1)
Future Changes in the Courts
450(2)
Shifts in Philosophy and Practice
451(1)
Corrections and the Future
452(4)
The Changing Nature of ``Justice,'' Treatment, and Custody
452(1)
Changing Corrections Personnel and Populations
453(1)
Future Needs of Correctional Managers
454(1)
Prison Construction: Coping with Community Perceptions
455(1)
The Entire Justice System: Future Issues
456(3)
Personnel Professionalization and Other Issues
456(1)
Future High Technology
456(1)
Allocation of Resources
457(1)
Flattening the Organization
458(1)
Case Studies
459(1)
Summary
460(1)
Questions for Review
460(1)
Notes
460(4)
Appendix I Related Web Sites 464(2)
Appendix II Analects of Confucius and Machiavelli 466(3)
Index 469

Excerpts

This fourth edition ofJustice Administration: Police, Courts, and Corrections Managementcontinues to be the sole book of its kind: a single author's examination of all facets of the criminal justice system as well as several related matters of interest to prospective and actual administrators. The author has held several administrative and academic positions in a criminal justice career spanning more than 30 years; thus, this book's chapters contain a palpable "real world" flavor not found in most textbooks. More than 30 case studies are disseminated throughout the text; these case studies are intended to allow the reader to experience some of the kinds of problems confronted daily by justice administrators; with a fundamental knowledge of the system, and a reading of the chapters in the respective book part, readers should be in a position to arrive at several feasible solutions to each problem that is presented. In addition to the chapters concerning police, courts, and corrections administration, also included are chapters on personnel and financial administration, rights of criminal justice employees, technology, discipline and liability, and futures. Articles fromLaw Enforcement Newsand other sources are interspersed throughout the book, and this edition also includes a new chapter concerning ethics in criminal justice. Other chapter sections that have been added or expanded deal with bioterrorism, racial profiling, school violence, vehicle pursuits, judicial selection, jury administration, gender bias, and women in corrections. Also new to this edition are key terms and concepts and chapter learning objectives, which appear at the beginning of each chapter. Criminal justice is a people business. This book reflects that fact as it looks at human foibles and some of the problems of personnel and policy in justice administration. Thanks to many innovators in the field, however, a number of exciting and positive changes are occurring. The general goal of the book is to inform the reader of the primarypeople, practices,andtermsthat are utilized in justice administration. There may well be activities, policies, actions, and my own views with which the reader will disagree. This is not at all bad, because in the management of people and agencies there are no absolutes, only ideas and endeavors to make the system better. From its beginning (which includes an introduction by the president of the National judicial College, Hon. William F. Dressel) through its final chapter, the reader is provided with a comprehensive and penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging positions that one can occupy in America: the administration of a criminal justice agency. I kindly solicit your input concerning any facet of this textbook; feel free to contact me if you have ideas for improving it.


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...