9780340758960

Linguistics for Clinicians: A Practical Introduction

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780340758960

  • ISBN10:

    0340758961

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 2003-03-28
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Summary

Linguistics for Clinicians provides an introduction to linguistic analysis in the clinical context. The book draws on a range of linguistic theories and descriptions, equipping readers with a conceptual toolkit that will enable them to: Analyze data systematically, taking into account different types of linguistic properties Pick out significant patterns that can give them clinically relevant cues Build explicit arguments to back up their observations and hypotheses. Select relevant linguistic items for assessment and therapy tasks. Analytical tips are included to anticipate and deal with common problems of clinical application. Extensive exercises further illustrate the use of linguistic concepts in data analysis and task construction. Linguistics for Clinicians is primarily a linguistics textbook for students and teachers in clinical courses. It is also a useful resource for practicing clinicians, psycholinguistics students and researchers in language impairments.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements x
PART I INTRODUCTION
1(26)
Guide to this book
3(7)
For students
3(4)
For teachers
7(3)
Meaning and form in language processing
10(17)
Introduction
10(1)
Why we need to distinguish language function from language form and meaning
10(6)
Giving form to meaning: words
16(5)
Giving form to meaning: sentences
21(2)
Meaning and form in language processing
23(4)
PART II SYNTAX
27(96)
Syntactic categories
29(23)
What are syntactic categories?
29(2)
Why do we need syntactic categories?
31(6)
Syntactic category tests: introduction
37(6)
Analytical tips
43(2)
Links to other levels
45(7)
Hierarchical structure
52(31)
Introduction
52(1)
Why do we need constituents?
53(6)
Constituency tests: general
59(5)
Types of constituent
64(7)
Types of constituents and their internal structure
71(4)
Analytical tips
75(2)
Links to other levels
77(6)
Representing structure
83(20)
Brackets, trees and other devices
83(4)
Why do we need diagrams?
87(1)
Defining structural relations
88(2)
The general structure of phrases
90(7)
Analytical tips
97(2)
Links to other levels
99(4)
The syntactic shape of sentences
103(20)
What is a sentence?
103(2)
Why do we need to focus on verbs?
105(4)
Verb subcategories
109(8)
Links to other levels
117(6)
PART III SYNTAX -- SEMANTIC LINKS: SITUATIONS
123(82)
Shaping situations: making them dynamic or static
125(17)
Introduction
125(2)
What makes events and states different
127(6)
Why we need the distinction
133(3)
The event/state continuum
136(2)
Analytical tips
138(4)
Shaping situations: making the focus narrow or wide
142(33)
Introduction
142(4)
Narrow focus verbs
146(14)
Wide focus verbs
160(3)
Wide focus verbs that include ACT
163(4)
Summary of situation types
167(2)
Why we need these concepts
169(6)
Shaping situations: selecting participants
175(18)
Introduction
175(1)
How to apply thematic role labels
175(6)
How to tell complements and adjuncts
181(6)
Why we need these concepts in the clinic
187(6)
Shaping situations: foregrounding participants
193(12)
Introduction
193(1)
Subjects and objects in English
194(3)
Where participants end up
197(4)
Why we need these concepts
201(4)
PART IV SYNTAX -- SEMANTIC LINKS: TIME AND MODALITY
205(50)
The auxiliary system
207(22)
Introduction
207(1)
Why we need to look at tense and auxiliaries
208(1)
The auxiliary system
209(6)
The full picture
215(1)
Auxiliaries and different sentence functions
216(9)
Links to other levels
225(4)
Tense and aspect
229(13)
Introduction
229(1)
Why look at time?
230(1)
Past time
231(4)
Present time
235(2)
Future time
237(2)
Links to other levels
239(3)
Modality
242(13)
Introduction
242(2)
Why look at modality?
244(1)
Modal meanings
245(5)
Links to other levels
250(5)
PART V SYNTAX -- PHONOLOGY LINKS
255(23)
The phonological shape of sentences
257(19)
Introduction
257(2)
Why look at stress patterns?
259(3)
What determines the stress pattern of a sentence?
262(4)
More on the phonology of prepositions
266(2)
More on the phonology of auxiliary verbs and the main verb be
268(1)
The representation of stress patterns
268(1)
Rhythmic alternation: the 'dum-di-dum' rhythm of language
269(1)
Links to other levels
270(6)
Conclusion
276(2)
Where we got to
276(1)
Where to go from here
277(1)
Keys to exercises 278(19)
Further reading 297(4)
References 301(8)
Index 309

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