9780133981995

Living Literature : Using Children's Literature to Support Reading and Language Arts

by ; ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780133981995

  • ISBN10:

    0133981991

  • Edition: CD
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2004-11-04
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

This is the ideal book to help prospective teachers improve children's reading and language arts skills and instill in them a genuine and lasting love of reading.The book demonstrates numerous ways to integrate literature into the daily fabric of classroom life. Following a solid grounding in the basics every reading teacher needs, individual chapters explore genres of children's literature and teaching strategies specific to each genre. Then, the authors examine currently accepted effective practices for engaging young readers in hands-on reading in a way that fosters a love of literature that will last a lifetime.Early childhood and elementary education literature and language arts teachers.

Table of Contents

Part I Foundations for the Literature Classroom
1(86)
Believing in Living Literature
2(20)
What It Means to Live Literature
3(2)
Examining Your Beliefs
5(4)
Goals for Living Literature
9(1)
Developing Good Reading Attitudes
10(1)
Planning for Living Literature
11(1)
The Living Literature Curriculum Framework
12(2)
Developing Your Library Collection
14(1)
Principles of Living Literature
15(2)
Summary
17(1)
Action Research for Teachers
17(5)
A Living Literature Classroom: Judy Smith's Third Grade
18(4)
Culturally Responsive Classrooms
22(14)
What is Culture?
23(2)
The Need for Culturally Responsive Schooling
25(4)
Meeting the Needs of All Learners
29(1)
What Does This Have to Do With Teaching Literature?
29(6)
Summary
35(1)
Action Research for Teachers
35(1)
Understanding What We Read: Comprehension, Vocabulary, and Discussion
36(22)
What Is Comprehension?
37(1)
The Role of the Teacher
38(1)
A Transactional Theory of Comprehension
38(2)
Readability
40(1)
Building Comprehension
40(3)
Assessing Comprehension
43(7)
What's in My Lexicon?
50(4)
We Have So Much to Talk About! Generating Good Discussions
54(2)
Summary
56(1)
Action Research for Teachers
57(1)
Responding to Literature
58(29)
Response: The Reader
59(12)
Response: The Text
71(1)
Response: The Context
71(2)
Cultural Influences and Response
73(1)
Reader and Text: A Literary Transaction
73(3)
Teaching From a Literary Transaction Perspective
76(1)
Activities for Deepening Children's Responses to Literature
77(8)
Summary
85(1)
Action Research for Teachers
85(2)
Part II Learning About Literature
87(168)
Poetry
88(34)
What Is Poetry?
89(2)
The Elements of Poetry
91(5)
Forms of Poetry for Children
96(1)
Choosing Quality Poetry
97(1)
Building a Classroom Library of Poetry
98(11)
Poetry in the Living Literature Classroom
109(1)
Looking Back Into Your History With Poetry
109(2)
Children's Poetry Preferences
111(1)
Selecting Poetry to Share With Students
111(2)
Sharing Poetry With Children: Discussions
113(1)
Sharing Poetry With Children: Informal Activities
113(2)
Performing Poetry
115(1)
Writing Poetry
116(2)
Summary
118(1)
Action Research for Teachers
119(3)
Traditional Literature
122(24)
What Is Traditional Literature?
123(1)
Literary Elements of Traditional Literature
124(3)
Categorizing Traditional Literature by Form
127(3)
Guidelines for Selecting High-Quality Traditional Literature
130(3)
Building a Classroom Library
133(3)
Traditional Literature in the Living Literature Classroom
136(1)
Selecting Traditional Tales for Classroom Activities
136(1)
Sharing and Discussing Traditional Literature With Students
136(5)
Writing and Traditional Literature
141(2)
Summary
143(1)
Action Research for Teachers
144(2)
Picture Books
146(30)
What Are Picture Books?
147(2)
Elements of Picture Books
149(11)
Forms of Picture Books
160(2)
Choosing Quality Picture Books
162(1)
Building a Classroom Library
163(1)
Special Considerations for Young Children
164(1)
Picture Books in Intermediate and Middle School Classrooms
164(1)
Picture Books in the Living Literature Classroom
165(1)
Webbing Books
165(3)
Teaching With Picture Books
168(3)
Picture Books as Writing Models
171(1)
More Strategies With Books
172(2)
Performing With Picture Books
174(1)
Summary
175(1)
Action Research for Teachers
175(1)
The Fiction Family: Realistic Fiction, Historical Fiction, Fantasy, and Science Fiction
176(44)
What Is Fiction?
178(1)
Types of Fiction Used With Children
178(2)
Elements of Fiction
180(8)
Guidelines for Selecting High-Quality Fiction
188(1)
Building a Classroom Library
188(3)
Categorizing Fiction
191(11)
Fiction in the Living Literature Classroom
202(1)
Censorship
202(1)
Critical Literacy
203(1)
Author/Illustrator Studies
204(1)
Drama and Fiction
205(1)
Strategies for Before, During, and After Reading
206(6)
Summary
212(1)
Action Research for Teachers
212(8)
A Living Literature Classroom: Alexis Stigge's Multiage Intermediate Class
215(5)
Nonfiction
220(35)
What Is Nonfiction?
222(2)
Elements of Nonfiction
224(5)
Categorizing Nonfiction by Form
229(7)
Selecting High-Quality Nonfiction
236(2)
Building a Classroom Nonfiction Library
238(1)
Nonfiction in the Living Literature Classroom
239(1)
Becoming Committed to Using Nonfiction
239(1)
Reading Aloud Nonfiction
240(1)
Teaching Students About the Genre of Nonfiction
240(6)
Using Nonfiction to Support Exploration of Independent Research Topics
246(5)
Supporting Response to Nonfiction With Drama
251(1)
Summary
252(1)
Action Research for Teachers
253(2)
Part III Literature for Teaching Reading and Writing
255(78)
Reading Aloud: Bringing Literature Alive for All Ages
256(18)
Why Is Reading Aloud So Essential?
258(2)
Guidelines for Effective Read-Alouds
260(7)
Reading Aloud and Its Place in Instruction
267(1)
Summary
268(1)
Action Research for Teachers
269(5)
A Living Literature Classroom: Tracy Hallee's First Grade
270(4)
Shared and Guided Reading
274(18)
Shared Reading
276(10)
Guided Reading
286(4)
Summary
290(1)
Action Research for Teachers
291(1)
Independent Reading
292(10)
What Is Independent Reading?
293(1)
Critical Elements of Independent Reading
294(6)
How Is Independent Reading Organized?
300(1)
Summary
300(1)
Action Research for Teachers
301(1)
Literature Circles
302(14)
What Are Literature Circles?
303(1)
Implementing Literature Circles Using Fiction
304(7)
Variations on Literature Circles
311(1)
Research on Literature Circles
311(1)
Literature Circles and Special Needs Learners
312(1)
Literature Circles in Primary Grades
312(1)
Cultural Considerations
313(1)
Assessing Literature Circles
313(2)
Summary
315(1)
Action Research for Teachers
315(1)
Students as Authors: Literature and the Writing Process
316(17)
Learning to Write by Reading
317(1)
Teachers as Writing Models
317(1)
The Writing Process in the Living Literature Classroom
318(1)
The Writer's Workshop in the Living Literature Classroom
319(2)
Managing the Writing Classroom
321(4)
Using Books to Teach Writing
325(4)
Classroom Publishing
329(1)
Young Author's Conferences
329(1)
Summary
330(1)
Action Research for Teachers
331(2)
Appendix A Categories of Fiction 333(6)
Appendix B Categories of Nonfiction 339(4)
Children's Book References 343(30)
References 373(12)
Index 385(15)
Credits 400

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