9780130314864

Logic & Computer Design Fundamentals (2nd Updated Ed)

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780130314864

  • ISBN10:

    0130314862

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2000-07-01
  • Publisher: PRENTICE HALL PTR

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $102.00 Save up to $25.50
  • Buy Used
    $76.50
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    USUALLY SHIPS IN 2-4 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

"Offering integrated coverage of both digital and computer design, this text offers well-organized, concise, yet comprehensive content, presented from a contemporary engineering viewpoint. Understanding of the material is supported by clear explanations and a progressive development of examples ranging from sample combinatorial applications to a CISC architecture built upon a RISC core. A thorough coverage of traditional topics is combined with increased attention to computer-aided design, problem formulation, solution verification, and the building of problem-solving skills."--BOOK JACKET.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Digital Computers and Information
3(24)
Digital Computers
3(5)
Information Representation
5(1)
Computer Structure
6(1)
More on the Generic Computer
6(2)
Number Systems
8(5)
Binary Numbers
9(1)
Octal and Hexadecimal Numbers
10(2)
Number Ranges
12(1)
Arithmetic Operations
13(4)
Conversion from Decimal to Other Bases
15(2)
Decimal Codes
17(3)
BCD Addition
19(1)
Alphanumeric Codes
20(3)
ASCII Character Code
20(2)
Parity Bit
22(1)
Chapter Summary
23(4)
References
23(1)
Problems
24(3)
Combinational Logic Circuits
27(64)
Binary Logic and Gates
27(4)
Binary Logic
28(2)
Logic Gates
30(1)
Boolean Algebra
31(8)
Basic Identities of Boolcan Algebra
33(2)
Algebraic Manipulation
35(3)
Complement of a Function
38(1)
Standard Forms
39(6)
Minterms and Maxterms
39(4)
Sum of Products
43(1)
Product of Sums
44(1)
Map Simplification
45(10)
Two-Variable Map
46(1)
Three-Variable Map
47(5)
Four-Variable Map
52(3)
Map Manipulation
55(7)
Essential Prime Implicants
55(2)
Nonessential Prime Implicants
57(1)
Product-of-Sums Simplification
58(2)
Don't-Care Conditions
60(2)
NAND and NOR Gates
62(9)
NAND Circuits
64(1)
Two-Level Implementation
65(2)
Multilevel NAND Circuits
67(2)
NOR Circuits
69(2)
Exclusive-OR Gates
71(5)
Odd Function
73(1)
Parity Generation and Checking
74(2)
Integrated Circuits
76(6)
Levels of Integration
76(1)
Digital Logic Families
76(3)
Positive and Negative Logic
79(2)
Transmission Gates
81(1)
Chapter Summary
82(9)
References
83(1)
Problems
83(8)
Combinational Logic Design
91(92)
Combinational Circuits
91(1)
Design Topics
92(8)
Design Hierarchy
93(3)
Top-Down Design
96(1)
Computer-Aided Design
96(1)
Hardware Description Languages
97(2)
Logic Synthesis
99(1)
Analysis Procedure
100(5)
Derivation of Boolean Functions
101(1)
Derivation of the Truth Table
102(1)
Logic Simulation
103(2)
Design Procedure
105(6)
Code Converters
107(4)
Decoders
111(5)
Decoder Expansion
113(1)
Combinational Circuit Implementation
114(2)
Encoders
116(3)
Priority Encoder
117(2)
Multiplexers
119(6)
Combinational Circuit Implementation
122(2)
Demultiplexer
124(1)
Binary Adders
125(7)
Half Adder
125(1)
Full Adder
126(1)
Binary Ripple Carry Adder
127(2)
Carry Lookahead Adder
129(3)
Binary Subtraction
132(5)
Complements
134(1)
Subtraction with Complements
135(2)
Binary Adder-Subtractors
137(7)
Signed Binary Numbers
138(2)
Signed Binary Addition and Subtraction
140(2)
Overflow
142(2)
Binary Multipliers
144(1)
Decimal Arithmetic
145(3)
Use of Complements in Decimal
147(1)
HDL Representations --- VHDL
148(11)
Structural Description
150(3)
Dataflow Description
153(2)
Hierarchical Description
155(2)
Behavioral Description
157(2)
HDL Representations --- Verilog
159(8)
Structural Description
160(1)
Dataflow Description
161(4)
Hierarchical Description
165(1)
Behavioral Description
165(2)
Chapter Summary
167(16)
References
168(1)
Problems
168(15)
Sequential Circuits
183(66)
Sequential Circuit Definitions
184(2)
Latches
186(5)
SR and S R Latches
187(3)
D Latch
190(1)
Flip-Flops
191(10)
Master-Slave Flip-Flop
192(3)
Edge-Triggered Flip-Flop
195(2)
Standard Graphics Symbols
197(2)
Characteristic Tables
199(1)
Direct Inputs
200(1)
Sequential Circuit Analysis
201(7)
Input Equations
201(1)
State Table
202(4)
Analysis with JK Flip-Flops
206(1)
State Diagram
206(2)
Sequential Circuit Design
208(6)
Design Procedure
208(1)
Finding State Diagrams, and State Tables
209(5)
Designing with D Flip-Flops
214(4)
Designing with Unused States
215(3)
Designing with JK Flip-Flops
218(6)
Flip-Flop Excitation Tables
218(1)
Design Procedure
219(5)
HDL Representation for Sequential Circuits --- VHDL
224(8)
HDL Representation for Sequential Circuits --- Verilog
232(7)
References
239(10)
Problems
240(9)
Registers and Counters
249(36)
Definition of Register and Counter
249(1)
Registers
250(3)
Register with Parallel Load
251(2)
Shift Registers
253(8)
Serial Transfer
254(2)
Serial Addition
256(2)
Shift Register with Parallel Load
258(2)
Bidirectional Shift Register
260(1)
Ripple Counter
261(2)
Synchronous Binary Counters
263(10)
Design of Binary Counters
264(3)
Counter with D-Flip Flops
267(1)
Serial and Parallel Counters
268(1)
Up-Down Binary Counter
269(1)
Binary Counter with Parallel Load
270(3)
Other Counters
273(3)
BCD Counter
273(1)
Arbitrary Count Sequence
274(2)
HDL Representation for Shift Registers and Counters
276(2)
HDL Representation for Shift Registers and Counters
278(1)
Chapter Summary
279(6)
References
280(1)
Problems
280(5)
Memory and Programmable Logic Devices
285(54)
Memory and Programmable Logic Device
285(2)
Definitions
286(1)
Random-access Memory
287(5)
Write and Read Operations
289(1)
Timing Waveforms
290(2)
Properties of Memory
292(1)
RAM Integrated Circuits
292(15)
Three-State Buffers
296(1)
Coincident Selection
297(4)
Dynamic RAM ICs
301(6)
Array of RAM ICs
307(3)
Arrays of Dynamic RAM ICs
310(1)
Programmable Logic Technologies
310(2)
Read-only Memory
312(5)
Combinational Circuit Implementation
315(2)
Programmable Logic Array
317(4)
Programmable Array Logic Devices
321(5)
VLSI Programmable Logic Devices
326(7)
Altera MAX 7000 CPLDs
326(2)
Xilinx XC4000 Structure
328(2)
Xilinx Interconnections
330(1)
Xilinx Logic
331(2)
Chapter Summary
333(6)
References
334(1)
Problems
335(4)
Register Transfers and Datapaths
339(52)
Datapaths and Operations
340(1)
Register Transfer Operations
341(4)
A Note for VHDL And Verilog Users Only
344(1)
Microoperations
345(5)
Arithmetic Microoperations
345(2)
Logic Microoperations
347(2)
Shift Microoperations
349(1)
Multiplexer-based Transfer
350(1)
Bus-based Transfer
351(6)
Three-State Bus
353(2)
Memory Transfer
355(2)
Datapaths
357(3)
The Arithmetic/Logic Unit
360(6)
Arithmetic Circuit
360(3)
Logic Circuit
363(1)
Arithmetic/Logic Unit
364(2)
The Shifter
366(2)
Barrel Shifter
367(1)
Datapath Representation
368(2)
The Control Word
370(6)
Pipelined Datapath
376(6)
Execution of Pipeline Microoperations
381(1)
Chapter Summary
382(9)
References
383(1)
Problems
383(8)
Sequencing and Control
391(76)
The Control Unit
392(1)
Algorithmic State Machines
393(4)
The ASM Chart
393(3)
Timing Considerations
396(1)
Design Example: Binary Multiplier
397(5)
Binary Multiplier
397(2)
Multiplier Datapath
399(1)
ASM Chart for Multiplier
400(2)
Hardwired Control
402(8)
Sequence Register and Decoder
404(2)
One Flip-Flop per State
406(4)
HDL Representation of the Binary Multiplier --- VHDL
410(3)
HDL Representation of the Binary Multiplier --- Verilog
413(3)
Microprogrammed Control
416(8)
Binary Multiplier Example
418(6)
A Simple Computer Architecture
424(5)
Instructions
424(1)
Instruction Formats
425(3)
Storage Resource Diagram
428(1)
Single-Cycle Hardwired Control
429(8)
Instruction Decoder
431(2)
Sample Instructions and Program
433(4)
Multiple---Cycle Microprogrammed Control
437(13)
Microprogram Design
440(7)
The Hardwired Alternative
447(3)
Pipelined Control
450(5)
Pipeline Programming and Performance
453(2)
Chapter Summary
455(12)
References
456(1)
Problems
456(11)
Instruction Set Architecture
467(44)
Computer Architecture Concepts
467(2)
Basic Computer Operation Cycle
468(1)
Register Set
469(1)
Operand Addressing
469(7)
Three-address Instructions
470(1)
Two-address Instructions
471(1)
One-address Instructions
471(1)
Zero-address Instructions
472(1)
Addressing Architectures
473(3)
Addressing Modes
476(6)
Implied Mode
477(1)
Immediate Mode
477(1)
Register and Register-Indirect Modes
477(1)
Direct Addressing Mode
478(2)
Indirect Addressing Mode
480(1)
Relative Addressing Mode
480(1)
Indexed Addressing Mode
481(1)
Summary of Addressing Modes
482(1)
Instruction Set Architectures
482(2)
Data Transfer Instructions
484(3)
Stack Instructions
484(2)
Independent versus Memory-Mapped I/O
486(1)
Data Manipulation Instructions
487(4)
Arithmetic Instructions
487(1)
Logical and Bit Manipulation Instructions
488(2)
Shift Instructions
490(1)
Floating-point Computations
491(4)
Arithmetic Operations
492(1)
Biased Exponent
493(1)
Standard Operand Format
493(2)
Program Control Instructions
495(5)
Conditional Branch Instructions
497(2)
Procedure Call and Return Instructions
499(1)
Program Interrupt
500(4)
Types of Interrupts
502(1)
Processing External Interrupts
503(1)
Chapter Summary
504(7)
References
505(1)
Problems
505(6)
Central Processing Unit Designs
511(64)
Two CPU Designs
511(1)
The Complex Instruction Set Computer
512(30)
Instruction Set Architecture
512(5)
Datapath Organization
517(6)
Microprogrammed Control Organization
523(8)
Microprogram Structure
531(2)
Microroutines
533(9)
The Reduced Instruction Set Computer
542(20)
Instruction Set Architecture
542(3)
Addressing Modes
545(1)
Datapath Organization
546(3)
Control Organization
549(2)
Data Hazards
551(7)
Control Hazards
558(4)
More on Design
562(7)
CISC-RISC Comparison
562(2)
High-Performance CPU Concepts
564(4)
Recent Architectural Innovations
568(1)
Digital Systems
569(1)
Chapter Summary
569(6)
References
570(1)
Problems
571(4)
Input-Output and Communication
575(38)
Computer I/O
575(1)
Sample Peripherals
576(5)
Keyboard
576(1)
Hard Disk
577(2)
Graphics Display
579(1)
I/O Transfer Rates
580(1)
I/O Interfaces
581(7)
I/O Bus and Interface Unit
582(2)
Example of I/O Interface
584(1)
Strobing
585(2)
Handshaking
587(1)
Serial Communication
588(6)
Asynchronous Transmission
589(1)
Synchronous Transmission
590(4)
The Keyboard Revisited
594(1)
A Packet-Based Serial I/O Bus
595
Modes of Transfer
594(4)
Example of Program-Controlled Transfer
595(1)
Interrupt-Intiated Transfer
596(2)
Priority Interrupt
598(4)
Daisy Chain Priority
599(1)
Parallel Priority Hardware
600(2)
Direct Memory Access
602(4)
DMA Controller
603(1)
DMA Transfer
604(2)
I/O Processors
606(3)
Chapter Summary
609(4)
References
609(1)
Problems
610(3)
Memory Systems
613(30)
Memory Hierarchy
614(2)
Locality of Reference
616(2)
Cache Memory
618(14)
Cache Mappings
620(6)
Line Size
626(1)
Cache Loading
627(1)
Write Methods
627(1)
Integration of Concepts
628(3)
Instruction and Data Caches
631(1)
Multiple-Level Caches
631(1)
Virtual Memory
632(6)
Page Tables
634(2)
Translation Lookaside Buffer
636(2)
Virtual Memory and Cache
638(1)
Chapter Summary
638(5)
References
639(1)
Problems
639(4)
Index 643

Rewards Program

Write a Review