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9780618129027

The Lord of the Rings

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780618129027

  • ISBN10:

    0618129022

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-04-01
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
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Summary

In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven-smiths, and Sauron, The Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and though he sought it throughout Middle-earth, it remained lost to him. After many ages it fell, by chance, into the hands of the hobbit, Bilbo Baggins. From his fastness in the Dark Tower of Mordor, Sauron's power spread far and wide. He gathered all the Great Rings to him, but ever he searched far and wide for the One Ring that would complete his dominion. On his eleventy-first birthday Bilbo disappeared, bequeathing to his young cousin Frodo the Ruling Ring and a perilous quest --- to journey across Middle-earth, deep into the shadow of the Dark Lord, and destroy the Ring by casting it into the Cracks of Doom. THE LORD OF THE RINGS tells of the great quest undertaken by Frodo and the Fellowship of the Ring: Gandalf the Wizard, Merry, Pippin, and Sam, Gimli the Dwarf, Legolas the Elf, Boromir of Gondor, and a tall, mysterious stranger called Strider.

Table of Contents

Note on the Text xi
Foreword to the Second Edition xv
Prologue Concerning Hobbits, and other matters 1(20)
THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING
BOOK ONE
A Long-expected Party
21(20)
The Shadow of the Past
41(23)
Three is Company
64(20)
A Short Cut to Mushrooms
84(12)
A Conspiracy Unmasked
96(11)
The Old Forest
107(14)
In the House of Tom Bombadil
121(11)
Fog on the Barrow-downs
132(14)
At the Sign of The Prancing Pony
146(14)
Strider
160(12)
A Knife in the Dark
172(20)
Flight to the Ford
192(21)
BOOK TWO
Many Meetings
213(20)
The Council of Elrond
233(32)
The Ring Goes South
265(22)
A Journey in the Dark
287(26)
The Bridge of Khazad-dum
313(11)
Lothlorien
324(20)
The Mirror of Galadriel
344(14)
Farewell to Lorien
358(13)
The Great River
371(15)
The Breaking of the Fellowship
386(17)
THE TWO TOWERS
BOOK THREE
The Departure of Boromir
403(8)
The Riders of Rohan
411(23)
The Uruk-hai
434(16)
Treebeard
450(27)
The White Rider
477(18)
The King of the Golden Hall
495(19)
Helm's Deep
514(16)
The Road to Isengard
530(16)
Flotsam and Jetsam
546(16)
The Voice of Saruman
562(12)
The Palantir
574(15)
BOOK FOUR
The Taming of Smeagol
589(17)
The Passage of the Marshes
606(16)
The Black Gate is Closed
622(12)
Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
634(14)
The Window on the West
648(20)
The Forbidden Pool
668(11)
Journey to the Cross-roads
679(9)
The Stairs of Cirith Ungol
688(13)
Shelob's Lair
701(10)
The Choices of Master Samwise
711(20)
THE RETURN OF THE KING
BOOK FIVE
Minas Tirith
731(25)
The Passing of the Grey Company
756(18)
The Muster of Rohan
774(14)
The Siege of Gondor
788(24)
The Ride of the Rohirrim
812(9)
The Battle of the Pelennor Fields
821(11)
The Pyre of Denethor
832(8)
The Houses of Healing
840(14)
The Last Debate
854(11)
The Black Gate Opens
865(12)
BOOK SIX
The Tower of Cirith Ungol
877(18)
The Land of Shadow
895(17)
Mount Doom
912(15)
The Field of Cormallen
927(10)
The Steward and the King
937(15)
Many Partings
952(15)
Homeward Bound
967(8)
The Scouring of the Shire
975(23)
The Grey Havens
998
APPENDICES
A Annals of the Kings and Rulers
1009
I The Numenorean Kings
1009
II The House of Eorl
1038
III Durin's Folk
1045
B The Tale of Years (Chronology of the Westlands)
1057
C Family Trees (Hobbits)
1073
D Calendars
1079
E Writing and Spelling
1087
I Pronunciation of Words and Names
1087
II Writing
1091
F I The Languages and Peoples of the Third Age
1101
II On Translation
1107
INDEXES
I Songs and Verses
1113
II Persons, Beasts and Monsters
1114
III Places
1123
IV Things
1129

Excerpts

THE LORD OF THE RINGS THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING BOOK ONE Chapter 1 A Long-Expected Party When Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his eleventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence, there was much talk and excitement in Hobbiton. Bilbo was very rich and very peculiar, and had been the wonder of the Shire for sixty years, ever since his remarkable disappearance and unexpected return. The riches he had brought back from his travels had now become a local legend, and it was popularly believed, whatever the old folk might say, that the Hill at Bag End was full of tunnels stuffed with treasure. And if that was not enough for fame, there was also his prolonged vigour to marvel at. Time wore on, but it seemed to have little effect on Mr. Baggins. At ninety he was much the same as at fifty. At ninety-nine they began to call him well-preserved; but unchanged would have been nearer the mark. There were some that shook their heads and thought this was too much of a good thing; it seemed unfair that anyone should possess (apparently) perpetual youth as well as (reputedly) inexhaustible wealth. "It will have to be paid for," they said. "It isn"t natural, and trouble will come of it!" But so far trouble had not come; and as Mr. Baggins was generous with his money, most people were willing to forgive him his oddities and his good fortune. He remained on visiting terms with his relatives (except, of course, the Sackville-Bagginses), and he had many devoted admirers among the hobbits of poor and unimportant families. But he had no close friends, until some of his younger cousins began to grow up. The eldest of these, and Bilbo"s favourite, was young Frodo Baggins. When Bilbo was ninety-nine he adopted Frodo as his heir, and brought him to live at Bag End; and the hopes of the Sackville- Bagginses were finally dashed. Bilbo and Frodo happened to have the same birthday, September 22nd. "You had better come and live here, Frodo my lad," said Bilbo one day; "and then we can celebrate our birthday-parties comfortably together." At that time Frodo was still in his tweens, as the hobbits called the irresponsible twenties between childhood and coming of age at thirty-three. Twelve more years passed. Each year the Bagginses had given very lively combined birthday-parties at Bag End; but now it was understood that something quite exceptional was being planned for that autumn. Bilbo was going to be eleventy-one, 111, a rather curious number, and a very respectable age for a hobbit (the Old Took himself had only reached 130); and Frodo was going to be thirty- three, 33, an important number: the date of his "coming of age". Tongues began to wag in Hobbiton and Bywater; and rumour of the coming event travelled all over the Shire. The history and character of Mr. Bilbo Baggins became once again the chief topic of conversation; and the older folk suddenly found their reminiscences in welcome demand. No one had a more attentive audience than old Ham Gamgee, commonly known as the Gaffer. He held forth at The Ivy Bush, a small inn on the Bywater road; and he spoke with some authority, for he had tended the garden at Bag End for forty years, and had helped old Holman in the same job before that. Now that he was himself growing old and stiff in the joints, the job was mainly carried on by his youngest son, Sam Gamgee. Both father and son were on very friendly terms with Bilbo and Frodo. They lived on the Hill itself, in Number 3 Bagshot Row just below Bag End. "A very nice well-spoken gentlehobbit is Mr. Bilbo, as I"ve always said," the Gaffer declared. With perfect truth: for Bilbo was very poli

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